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Last Updated on October 30, 2017

Your Brain is a Muscle, Make it Strong with “Lumosity” Today

Your Brain is a Muscle, Make it Strong with “Lumosity” Today

By now you have undoubtedly heard about how important it is to keep your brain healthy and active. In order to prevent issues as you age, such as Alzheimers, you should try to exercise your mind. This can be done through many different types of brain-training games, but unfortunately they can often be a bit boring or repetitive. For example, Sudoku or other puzzle games can be fun at first, but once you get the hang of them it can feel a bit robotic.

Some apps claim to be brain-training, but often focus on one specific goal such as focus or logical thinking. Plus, those apps tend to ignore progress reporting which can present challenges when trying to monitor any type of improvement.

Why You Should Care about Brain Health

When discussing mental fitness, your mind may conjure up memories of school exams or even IQ tests, but it’s actually more about your physical and emotional health. When your brain is healthy it’s easier for you to slow down, decompress and even boost a flagging memory [1].

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Now think about the way your mind and body are connected. Do you remember the last time you had a really great workout? Maybe you ran a mile or biked through your neighborhood. That physical activity increased your oxygen flowing up to your brain and triggered a response of released endorphins. These are the chemicals that make you feel happy. When you have a constant stream of endorphins, you tend to be a happier person and maintain a balanced lifestyle. Mental exercise is just as important! Brain games like those found in the Lumosity App can increase your ability to reason and solve problems.

Sometimes it can be hard to turn your brain off. Maybe after an especially stressful day you couldn’t wait to sleep, but despite how physically tired you were, you couldn’t stop thinking. In this instance, brain health and fitness is crucial. If you’re mentally fit enough to be able to visualize something peaceful, you can physically reduce tension in your body and mind. Lumosity can help you achieve that state faster.

The Right App for Brain-Training

Luminosity is an innovative app that excels where the other apps lack. The impressive amount of thought that went into this app was no coincidence. In fact, it was created by a team of real-life scientists and designers who wanted to explore new ways to challenge the brain while simultaneously pushing cognitive research forward.

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What Makes Lumosity So Different From Other Brain Training Apps

Over 85 million users already enjoy challenging their brains with cognitive games, and they’re never bored; you can access a new brain workout every day of the month. The creators of the app made sure the experience seems fun and not at all like a chore.

Lumosity’s scientists took common cognitive and neuropsychological tasks, along with some new challenges, and partnered with designers to they transform these tasks into fun games that challenge core cognitive skills. They accomplished this though game-like memory training, attention training and more all while monitoring and tracking progress.

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    Along with a training calendar (showing days you have played at least one game), users can also access a performance trend. This feature monitors performance from the previous four weeks and tells you how many points you are in either direction. Performance categories include speed, memory, attention and flexibility.

      This free app can be used by almost anyone, as it comes in English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, and Spanish [2].

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      Don’t Wait and Start Your Training Now

      The app is available for Apple devices from the App Store. Not only is it free, but it’s easy to use and fun, too! What’s holding you back from having a healthier brain that gives you the ability to take charge of your life and also extend it? Try Lumosity today.

      Reference

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      Brian Lee

      Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

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      Published on July 17, 2018

      How Productive People Compartmentalize Time to Get the Most Done

      How Productive People Compartmentalize Time to Get the Most Done

      I’ve never believed people are born productive or organized. Being organized and productive is a choice.

      You choose to keep your stuff organized or you don’t. You choose to get on with your work and ignore distractions or you don’t.

      But one skill very productive people appear to have that is not a choice is the ability to compartmentalize. And that takes skill and practice.

      What is compartmentalization

      To compartmentalize means you have the ability to shut out all distractions and other work except for the work in front of you. Nothing gets past your barriers.

      In psychology, compartmentalization is a defence mechanism our brains use to shut out traumatic events. We close down all thoughts about the traumatic event. This can lead to serious mental-health problems such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) if not dealt with properly.

      However, compartmentalization can be used in positive ways to help us become more productive and allow us to focus on the things that are important to us.

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      Robin Sharma, the renowned leadership coach, calls it his Tight Bubble of Total Focus Strategy. This is where he shuts out all distractions, turns off his phone and goes to a quiet place where no one will disturb him and does the work he wants to focus on. He allows nothing to come between himself and the work he is working on and prides himself on being almost uncontactable.

      Others call it deep work. When I want to focus on a specific piece of work, I turn everything off, turn on my favourite music podcast The Anjunadeep Edition (soft, eclectic electronic music) and focus on the content I intend to work on. It works, and it allows me to get massive amounts of content produced every week.

      The main point about compartmentalization is that no matter what else is going on in your life — you could be going through a difficult time in your relationships, your business could be sinking into bankruptcy or you just had a fight with your colleague; you can shut those things out of your mind and focus totally on the work that needs doing.

      Your mind sees things as separate rooms with closable doors, so you can enter a mental room, close the door and have complete focus on whatever it is you want to focus on. Your mind does not wander.

      Being able to achieve this state can seriously boost your productivity. You get a lot more quality work done and you find you have a lot more time to do the things you want to do. It is a skill worth mastering for the benefits it will bring you.

      How to develop the skill of compartmentalization

      The simplest way to develop this skill is to use your calendar.

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      Your calendar is the most powerful tool you have in your productivity toolbox. It allows you to block time out, and it can focus you on the work that needs doing.

      My calendar allows me to block time out so I can remove everything else out of my mind to focus on one thing. When I have scheduled time for writing, I know what I want to write about and I sit down and my mind completely focuses on the writing.

      Nothing comes between me, my thoughts and the keyboard. I am in my writing compartment and that is where I want to be. Anything going on around me, such as a problem with a student, a difficulty with an area of my business or an argument with my wife is blocked out.

      Understand that sometimes there’s nothing you can do about an issue

      One of the ways to do this is to understand there are times when there is nothing you can do about an issue or an area of your life. For example, if I have a student with a problem, unless I am able to communicate with that student at that specific time, there is nothing I can do about it.

      If I can help the student, I would schedule a meeting with the student to help them. But between now and the scheduled meeting there is nothing I can do. So, I block it out.

      The meeting is scheduled on my calendar and I will be there. Until then, there is nothing I can do about it.

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      Ask yourself the question “Is there anything I can do about it right now?”

      This is a very powerful way to help you compartmentalize these issues.

      If there is, focus all your attention on it to the exclusion of everything else until you have a workable solution. If not, then block it out, schedule time when you can do something about it and move on to the next piece of work you need to work on.

      Being able to compartmentalize helps with productivity in another way. It reduces the amount of time you spend worrying.

      Worrying about something is a huge waste of energy that never solves anything. Being able to block out issues you cannot deal with stops you from worrying about things and allows you to focus on the things you can do something about.

      Reframe the problem as a question

      Reframing the problem as a question such as “what do I have to do to solve this problem?” takes your mind away from a worried state into a solution state, where you begin searching for solutions.

      One of the reasons David Allen’s Getting Things Done book has endured is because it focuses on contexts. This is a form of compartmentalization where you only do work you can work on.

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      For instance, if a piece of work needs a computer, you would only look at the work when you were in front of a computer. If you were driving, you cannot do that work, so you would not be looking at it.

      Choose one thing to focus on

      To get better at compartmentalizing, look around your environment and seek out places where you can do specific types of work.

      Taking your dog for a walk could be the time you focus solely on solving project problems, commuting to and from work could be the time you spend reading and developing your skills and the time between 10 am and 12 pm could be the time you spend on the phone sorting out client issues.

      Once you make the decision about when and where you will do the different types of work, make it stick. Schedule it. Once it becomes a habit, you are well on your way to using the power of compartmentalization to become more productive.

      Comparmentalization saves you stress

      Compartmentalization is a skill that gives you time to deal with issues and work to the exclusion of all other distractions.

      This means you get more work done in less time and this allows you to spend more time with the people you want to spend more time with, doing the things you want to spend more time doing.

      Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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