Advertising
Advertising

The Ugly Truth About Comments and Reviews That No One Knows

The Ugly Truth About Comments and Reviews That No One Knows

How much do you feel you’re influenced on a daily basis? Social media opens us up to comparison of others but what about our opinions? If you’re presented with a video or article, it’s hard not to read the plethora of comments posted underneath before we’ve even clicked on it.

Many times people read movie reviews on IMDB to decide whether or not they will watch a film. And many times people meticulously read customer reviews and ratings on Amazon before deciding to buy something.

In essence, we’re being made to create an opinion before we’ve had the chance to make our own. Most of the time it’s alarmingly unconscious.

The Dangers of Reading Comments and Reviews

While we think we’re reading comments to make a balanced and informed decision, we don’t take into account the intentions behind another person’s comments.

Advertising

Most of us only leave comments if we strongly agree or disagree with something, meaning that around 90% of the comments you read are left by either very loyal supporters or people who are emotionally charged in a negative way. Therefore, we need to take into account that these extreme opinions tend to be biased and not constructive.

Emotions can drive our decisions. They can easily interject into our daily situations quickly and with little thought. If we get a positive emotion (excitement or enthusiasm) or negative emotion (anxiety or worry) in any given circumstance where a decision can be made, we are highly influenced by that emotion.

A study was conducted in 2003 where a group of American citizens were asked to read either a fear-inducing news story about anthrax mail threats, or an anger-inducing news story about Middle Eastern nations celebrating the 9/11 attacks. The research found people who were put into an angry state saw the world as ‘less risky’ and therefore supported harsher measures against suspected terrorists.[1]

This illustrates that, when we read seemingly harmless yet influential comments, we really have no idea about the commenter or their emotional state while writing their opinion. We can easily read them as authentic comments but in reality this is a myth.

Advertising

An Unknown Conspiracy

How genuine are the comments you read? The opportunity to make money is unfortunately allowing businesses to create the power to alter our opinions and decisions.

Many companies actually employ people to create fake comments in order to influence a customer’s decision. Even worse, some employ people to write negative comments about their competitors in order to attack their reputation.

Don’t underestimate the power and knowledge big guns have on how to strategically sway customer’s ideas and decisions through simple reviews and ratings. While it’s not yet illegal, watchdogs are becoming increasingly alarmed at the amount of fake reviews currently out there on all major sites. It’s worrying when many of us trust what we’re reading and even make big purchases based on seemingly positive reviews.

How Not to Be Manipulated by Comments and Reviews

We need to be very vigilant when it comes to comments. Being aware of either fake comments or understanding the possible emotion used by the writer at that moment it was written is a first step.

Advertising

Don’t Be Quick to React to Comments

You may read a comment you don’t agree with and often in this case, anger may rise up. But commenting in this state is only adding to a biased view. How many times do our emotions cause us to act in a certain way only to feel differently once we’ve stepped back and evaluated things?

It’s best to react with as little emotion as possible or make them irrelevant to your decision. It could be an opinion you feel extremely offended by or a review you just don’t agree with. While your opinion is important, take time out before you respond so your emotions are more balanced. This way you won’t add to the influence of emotional charge.

Be Critical of the Comments You Read

You may read a harsh and angry review about a product you’re thinking of purchasing but try to read between the lines.

Is there a specific reason or circumstance that has influenced their negative comment? Perhaps it’s something that wouldn’t apply to you. Try to read other comments the poster has written to see if they have a tendency to write negatively. In other words, step back, take what they’ve said into account but be aware of it’s overall influence.

Advertising

Others’ opinions are based on personal and emotional perspectives. While some may be valid, it’s best to use them as a reference only. Doing solid research especially when we’re investing money into buying something, is always a must to get a thorough and balanced view on the product. Read more about how to shut down the voice of the peanut gallery: The Jeopardy of Taking Others’ Opinions Seriously

The sad truth is we can miss out on great things if we’re influenced too much by negative comments or reviews. Instead of basing a movie on it’s IMDB rating or choosing a book on Amazon with the most stars, choose the genre you like and find out for yourself. It’s how we find those hidden gems that add value to our lives.

Reviews and Comments Are for Reference Only

At the end of the day, we need to be more aware of how much we’re influenced by others. Be mindful of the comments and reviews and don’t always take them at face value.

Our general life experiences and emotions can dictate how we react in any moment so the only opinion that matters will be yours – find out for yourself and form your own opinion. What doesn’t work for others may work for you.

Reference

More by this author

Brian Lee

Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

I’m Feeling Bored: 10 Ways to Conquer Boredom (and Busyness) How to Set Ambitious Career Goals (With Examples) Dismissing Sadness Will End up Making You Sadder How To Protect Your Focus From Being “Robbed” By Notifications and Social Media Why We Say What We Won’t Do (but Still Say It Anyway)

Trending in Productivity

1 How to Influence People and Make Them Feel Good 2 How to Be a Good Leader and Lead Effectively in Any Situation 3 Does the Pomodoro Technique Work for Your Productivity? 4 A Stress-Free Way To Prioritizing Tasks And Ending Busyness 5 4 Things Every True Leader Wants You to Know

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

Advertising

I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

Advertising

My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

Advertising

Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

Advertising

Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

Read Next