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If You Need to Ask for a Raise You Deserve, Probably You’ve Made This Mistake

If You Need to Ask for a Raise You Deserve, Probably You’ve Made This Mistake
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So you put in those long hours, excelled at many projects and earned far more than your keep at the company you work for. Understandably, you now expect the company to reward you for your efforts with a promotion and a long-due raise. And when the company doesn’t really rise up to occasion as we expect it to, many of us lose patience and begin to think of ways as to how to ask for a raise. The only problem being, you really shouldn’t!

Asking for a Raise Is Difficult Because Your Boss Doesn’t Share the Same View With You

We all tend to think highly of ourselves as employees – and feel that we give a lot more than we get in the professional environment we spend half of our lives in. On the flipside, our bosses may feel that we are lacking in some essential quality and even if we work hard at our desk, the company might feel that our current salary justifies the hours we put in.

So the core problem lies in the perception of our work and that of the company’s view of our work. Frankly, if you need to ask for a raise, you are either not as much of a star performer as you thought you were or the company thinks you are lacking in an essential skill.

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Payscale did a recent study and the odds seem to stand against you, even if you know how to ask for a raise. Some 30,000 workers were surveyed and 43% reported that they had indeed asked for a raise but only 44% of them actually got what they had asked for, while 25% did not get a raise at all. 57% did not ask for a raise at all, though 38% of them got one without asking for it.[1]

Being Too Modest Will Make Your Contribution Unseen

Frankly, while the economy is starting to look up – the raises haven’t exactly started to flow out till now. Since the percentage of people asking for raises and actually getting them is not particularly bright, it’s time to concentrate on how to get the company to value you enough to automatically give you a raise – without ever having to think about how to ask for a raise![2]

Remember that being modest does not work in the workplace – if your company does not realize your value, you have to work towards making them see all that you have done and achieved for them, and what more you can do for them as well.[3] Try and work towards the company giving you a raise by itself, rather than you having to ask and negotiate for one… Here are some tricks and tips.[4]

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How to Make Sure You Don’t Have to Ask for a Raise But You Still Get What You Deserve

If You Have Been Appreciated, Ask People to Speak Up on Your Behalf

If you are an awesome worker with a mile-long success list; chances are that your colleagues, counterparts or clients appreciate your work. The next time someone shows you their appreciation, as them to put it in writing to your immediate senior. This way, your boss will always know that you are a star performer.

Reclaim Your Territory Without a War

There might be times when people (read colleagues) take your ideas and turn them into their own, especially in front of the boss. Don’t claim the idea for your own for that will not help your case – instead, present more data and all the research that your colleague wasn’t able to steal from you and turn the spotlight back on you, cleverly.

Make Sure You Are Put in the Spotlight

The next time you are given an opportunity to present in front of the manager or the big boss, research your points as well as you can and try your best to make an impression. Go well-informed and armed with all the answers beforehand – shine in the time you have, the boss shall remember you in good grace, as will the head honchos.

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Word Your Achievements Right

The next time your immediate supervisor wants to know how you spent your week, don’t just list out what you did. Word it differently, to show how you worked for the company’s benefit, and what you have to show for it. For instance, if you reached out to 15 of your clients with a fresh offer – talk about how the clients are responding to it instead of just talking about your e-mail.

Keep Your Boss Updated

Send your boss a weekly or fortnightly mail on what you have achieved or plan to for the next few workdays. Along with letting your boss know that you are working to make the company a more successful one, it also establishes a work record and accomplishment of yours.

Be an Informed Employee

Beyond the necessary skills you need to do your job, make it a point to be better informed about your company’s brands, competitors and all things on the anvil. This will make you a person better equipped to speak up in discussions, talks and meetings and make sure the spotlight is often on you. Anticipate your boss’s needs and questions too – and instead of fumbling for an answer, be ready with answers and if you can, pre-empt the questions as well… So don’t just research on how to ask for a raise, research about the company before.

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Own Up to Your Mistakes

Most workers try to cover up their mistakes, afraid of the repercussions of the same. Stand apart from the crowd – if you know that you have made a mistake, own up to it in front of your boss and also let him or her know the solution that you have worked out to even things over. Ask for any further advice. You may get a cold shoulder for a bit, but your boss will remember that you are an accountable and responsible employee.

Be Proactive in Work and Training

Don’t ask your boss for work or training. Create your opportunities for your work to shine – and join up on some online courses in your free time to further your talent. Just make sure that you casually mention it to your boss if your work didn’t speak up for you…

Make Good Intra & Inter-Departmental Relationships

Being good at work is good but being a team player is even better. All companies appreciate a good worker all the more if he or she is able to successfully cultivate and maintain human relationships within the company and even outside – be it with clients or sister concerns. A smile and a cheerful tone of voice get things done much faster and far more smoothly.

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Be Calm & Keep Working

All bosses appreciate a calm and unruffled employee who can truly weather a storm – be it work, a personal crisis, or even just a general instability of the workplace. Let your work talk for you always – and keep your mind and eye on the goal ahead, instead of getting distracted by the various disturbances around. Be the first to chip in, offer an out-of-the-box solution or even those extra man hours if needed. Instead of wondering how to ask for a raise, put your nose to the grinder with a cheerful attitude and come up with innovative solutions every now and then.

Follow these steps long and well enough, and there won’t be a company who wouldn’t automatically give you a good raise for they would want to retain a hard-working, smart-thinking and non-complaining employee like you – who truly knows how to turn things around in his or her favor! That said; if you still end up wondering how to ask for a raise, remember three things: build your case, research pay scales and then research your pitch to smoothly ask for what you deserve.[5]

Reference

More by this author

Rima Pundir

Health, Wellness & Productivity Writer

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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