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How To Get Rid Of Oily Skin: 10 Effective DIY Facial Mask Ideas

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How To Get Rid Of Oily Skin: 10 Effective DIY Facial Mask Ideas

Having oily skin can be really frustrating. It’s hard to keep it clean, or to keep it feeling like it’s clean.

Face masks can be helpful for pulling oil out of the skin and making your face look and feel cleaner, but they can be expensive if you use them regularly. These DIY face mask recipes will save you money and give you peace of mind that you’re only putting safe ingredients on your face.

Why Oily Skin Happens?

The medical term for oily skin is seborrhea, and it’s caused by excess sebum, or skin oil, making your skin look greasy.

Oily skin is often caused by hormones, which is why it often shows up during puberty.[1] An increase in androgen levels during that time of life boost oil production, and while it sometimes goes away once puberty is over, some people are stuck with oily skin.

Having oily skin is genetic, and it can flare up during your period, when you’re stressed out, when it’s humid outside or when you’ve done things to produce more oil such as wearing heavy makeup regularly or spending too much time on a dirty cell phone.[2]

If you’re too hard on your skin by using harsh cleaning tools, makeup or cleansers that aren’t for your skin type or using tanning beds (which dry out the skin, causing it to produce more oil) you can also see oily outbreaks even if you’re not genetically predisposed to oily skin.[3] Even some medications can cause your skin to be more oily than normal.

Some of the things that are causing your oily skin might be within your control to change, but if you’re still having problems you can try a DIY face mask to help clear up the oil. These recipes use minimal, natural ingredients that won’t harm your skin or cause further problems.

Apple Cider Vinegar

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    A natural antibacterial and antiseptic substance, apple cider vinegar is a great choice for your skin, especially if you have acne as well as oily skin.

    Apple cider vinegar can be used alone on your skin; just put some on a cotton ball, apply to your face, let dry and rinse.

    You can also use it as a toner, or mix it with baking soda, which has exfoliating properties, to make a mask.

    Home Remedies for Life has that recipe as well as other DIY face mask ideas using apple cider vinegar and other ingredients such as sea salt, olive oil and aloe, to name a few.

    Banana Face Masks

      Another soothing ingredient you can get right at the grocery store that will help your oily skin is banana.

      You can simply mash banana and use it alone as a mask, or try one of the recipes from About Beauty. The recipe using banana and honey is the best for oily skin, but any of these would be great for giving your skin a boost.

      Really ripe bananas are best for this, and you can even freeze them for a cooling effect on your skin if you want.

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      Egg White Face Mask

        Using egg white on your skin is a great idea because the protein in eggs helps with tissue repair for skin that has been damaged by acne. It’s also hydrating and moisturizing and can help slow down the aging process of the skin.

        A super simple DIY face mask with egg white is this one from Bellatory that also uses honey and lemon. Honey is antibacterial and lemon juice is an astringent that helps clear out the bacteria that causes acne as well as lightening the skin and evening skin tone.

        Oatmeal Face Mask

          Add oatmeal to your combination of egg white and honey for an additional exfoliating boost that is great for cleaning and clearing the skin.

          Check out the recipe at Homemade Masks; it’s great for wrinkles, too.

          Clay and Witch Hazel

            Using clay in a DIY face mask is a classic. You won’t find this special clay at your regular grocery store, but you can probably find it at a natural foods store or order it online from an herb supplier (or your favorite mega retailer).

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            The reason bentonite clay is so great for your face is that it draws out impurities. Combine it with witch hazel, as in this recipe from Hello Glow, and you’ll have a great astringent, too, which is wonderful for getting the skin clean.

            Orange Peel Powder Masks

              Another ingredient that is great for the skin but a little harder to come by is orange peel powder. You may be able to find it in the spice section of your grocery store, but it will be less expensive if you buy it from an herbal supplier. You can even make your own orange peel powder by drying and grinding orange peels; check out the how-to from Bellatory.

              Whether you buy it or make it yourself, orange peel powder is a great cleanser, astringent and toner that improves circulation and is full of vitamins that encourage healthy skin tone.

              The SmartCooky site has a variety of DIY face mask recipes using orange peel powder. The one that includes multani mitti, or fuller’s earth, is perfect for oily skin. Multani mitti is a particular kind of clay that has been used in India for generations and is great for removing oil, clearing up acne, evening the skin tone and improving circulation, among other benefits.[4]

              Rose Water Face Mask

                Another ingredient found in many face mask recipes is rose water. Rose water is actually made from roses, and you can buy it or make your own — this simple tutorial from the Healthy Maven shows you how. It is cleansing, toning and soothing to skin all over the body and is a great addition to bath water as well as to face masks.

                My Beautiness has tips on making DIY face masks with rose water for different skin types. The ones for oily skin include our old friends honey and egg white, as well as one that uses barley flour for exfoliation (you could also grind up oatmeal if you don’t have barley handy).

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                Cornmeal and Yogurt Facial Scrub

                  A quick five-minute mask for oily skin that can be found at Homemade Masks uses yogurt, lemon juice and cornmeal.

                  Cornmeal is great for exfoliating, while lemon is antiseptic and yogurt helps balance and nourish skin.

                  Tomato Face Mask Recipes

                    A surprise ingredient that’s actually great to use in homemade face masks is tomatoes. They’re as healthy for your skin as they are for the rest of your body.

                    The vitamins in tomatoes can help fade blemishes and smooth out rough skin, build up collagen to maintain the skin’s elasticity and help moisturize your skin, among other things.

                    Combine tomato with lemon, honey or cucumber depending on your skin’s needs with these recipes from Bellatory.

                    Turmeric Face Mask

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                      Turmeric is the ingredient you want to use for clearing up acne and other skin irritations. It’s also great for smoothing out pigmentation irregularities and treating sunburn. And you probably already have some in your spice cabinet!

                      To make a turmeric face mask like the one at Healthy and Natural World, all you need is turmeric, honey and yogurt. It’s a mask that’s good enough to eat but you’ll want to use it on your face for lots of great benefits.

                      Reference

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                      Sarah White

                      Freelance Writer, Editor, Professional Crafter

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                      Last Updated on January 27, 2022

                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

                      Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

                      “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

                      Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

                      Food is a universal necessity.

                      It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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                      Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

                      Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

                      Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

                      Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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                      The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

                      Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

                      This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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                      Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

                      Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

                      Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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                      So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

                      Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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