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How To Get Rid Of Oily Skin: 10 Effective DIY Facial Mask Ideas

How To Get Rid Of Oily Skin: 10 Effective DIY Facial Mask Ideas

Having oily skin can be really frustrating. It’s hard to keep it clean, or to keep it feeling like it’s clean.

Face masks can be helpful for pulling oil out of the skin and making your face look and feel cleaner, but they can be expensive if you use them regularly. These DIY face mask recipes will save you money and give you peace of mind that you’re only putting safe ingredients on your face.

Why Oily Skin Happens?

The medical term for oily skin is seborrhea, and it’s caused by excess sebum, or skin oil, making your skin look greasy.

Oily skin is often caused by hormones, which is why it often shows up during puberty.[1] An increase in androgen levels during that time of life boost oil production, and while it sometimes goes away once puberty is over, some people are stuck with oily skin.

Having oily skin is genetic, and it can flare up during your period, when you’re stressed out, when it’s humid outside or when you’ve done things to produce more oil such as wearing heavy makeup regularly or spending too much time on a dirty cell phone.[2]

If you’re too hard on your skin by using harsh cleaning tools, makeup or cleansers that aren’t for your skin type or using tanning beds (which dry out the skin, causing it to produce more oil) you can also see oily outbreaks even if you’re not genetically predisposed to oily skin.[3] Even some medications can cause your skin to be more oily than normal.

Some of the things that are causing your oily skin might be within your control to change, but if you’re still having problems you can try a DIY face mask to help clear up the oil. These recipes use minimal, natural ingredients that won’t harm your skin or cause further problems.

Apple Cider Vinegar

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    A natural antibacterial and antiseptic substance, apple cider vinegar is a great choice for your skin, especially if you have acne as well as oily skin.

    Apple cider vinegar can be used alone on your skin; just put some on a cotton ball, apply to your face, let dry and rinse.

    You can also use it as a toner, or mix it with baking soda, which has exfoliating properties, to make a mask.

    Home Remedies for Life has that recipe as well as other DIY face mask ideas using apple cider vinegar and other ingredients such as sea salt, olive oil and aloe, to name a few.

    Banana Face Masks

      Another soothing ingredient you can get right at the grocery store that will help your oily skin is banana.

      You can simply mash banana and use it alone as a mask, or try one of the recipes from About Beauty. The recipe using banana and honey is the best for oily skin, but any of these would be great for giving your skin a boost.

      Really ripe bananas are best for this, and you can even freeze them for a cooling effect on your skin if you want.

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      Egg White Face Mask

        Using egg white on your skin is a great idea because the protein in eggs helps with tissue repair for skin that has been damaged by acne. It’s also hydrating and moisturizing and can help slow down the aging process of the skin.

        A super simple DIY face mask with egg white is this one from Bellatory that also uses honey and lemon. Honey is antibacterial and lemon juice is an astringent that helps clear out the bacteria that causes acne as well as lightening the skin and evening skin tone.

        Oatmeal Face Mask

          Add oatmeal to your combination of egg white and honey for an additional exfoliating boost that is great for cleaning and clearing the skin.

          Check out the recipe at Homemade Masks; it’s great for wrinkles, too.

          Clay and Witch Hazel

            Using clay in a DIY face mask is a classic. You won’t find this special clay at your regular grocery store, but you can probably find it at a natural foods store or order it online from an herb supplier (or your favorite mega retailer).

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            The reason bentonite clay is so great for your face is that it draws out impurities. Combine it with witch hazel, as in this recipe from Hello Glow, and you’ll have a great astringent, too, which is wonderful for getting the skin clean.

            Orange Peel Powder Masks

              Another ingredient that is great for the skin but a little harder to come by is orange peel powder. You may be able to find it in the spice section of your grocery store, but it will be less expensive if you buy it from an herbal supplier. You can even make your own orange peel powder by drying and grinding orange peels; check out the how-to from Bellatory.

              Whether you buy it or make it yourself, orange peel powder is a great cleanser, astringent and toner that improves circulation and is full of vitamins that encourage healthy skin tone.

              The SmartCooky site has a variety of DIY face mask recipes using orange peel powder. The one that includes multani mitti, or fuller’s earth, is perfect for oily skin. Multani mitti is a particular kind of clay that has been used in India for generations and is great for removing oil, clearing up acne, evening the skin tone and improving circulation, among other benefits.[4]

              Rose Water Face Mask

                Another ingredient found in many face mask recipes is rose water. Rose water is actually made from roses, and you can buy it or make your own — this simple tutorial from the Healthy Maven shows you how. It is cleansing, toning and soothing to skin all over the body and is a great addition to bath water as well as to face masks.

                My Beautiness has tips on making DIY face masks with rose water for different skin types. The ones for oily skin include our old friends honey and egg white, as well as one that uses barley flour for exfoliation (you could also grind up oatmeal if you don’t have barley handy).

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                Cornmeal and Yogurt Facial Scrub

                  A quick five-minute mask for oily skin that can be found at Homemade Masks uses yogurt, lemon juice and cornmeal.

                  Cornmeal is great for exfoliating, while lemon is antiseptic and yogurt helps balance and nourish skin.

                  Tomato Face Mask Recipes

                    A surprise ingredient that’s actually great to use in homemade face masks is tomatoes. They’re as healthy for your skin as they are for the rest of your body.

                    The vitamins in tomatoes can help fade blemishes and smooth out rough skin, build up collagen to maintain the skin’s elasticity and help moisturize your skin, among other things.

                    Combine tomato with lemon, honey or cucumber depending on your skin’s needs with these recipes from Bellatory.

                    Turmeric Face Mask

                      Turmeric is the ingredient you want to use for clearing up acne and other skin irritations. It’s also great for smoothing out pigmentation irregularities and treating sunburn. And you probably already have some in your spice cabinet!

                      To make a turmeric face mask like the one at Healthy and Natural World, all you need is turmeric, honey and yogurt. It’s a mask that’s good enough to eat but you’ll want to use it on your face for lots of great benefits.

                      Reference

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                      Sarah White

                      Freelance Writer, Editor, Professional Crafter

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                      Last Updated on April 19, 2021

                      How to Stick With Good Habits Even When Your Willpower is Gone

                      How to Stick With Good Habits Even When Your Willpower is Gone

                      Most people think that building good habits or changing their actions is all about willpower or motivation. But the more I learn, the more I believe that the number one driver of better habits and behavior change is your environment.

                      Let me drop some science into this article and show you what I mean.

                      Willpower vs. Environment

                      Anne Thorndike is a primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Recently, Thorndike and her colleagues completed a six month study that was published in the American Journal of Public Health.

                      This study secretly took place in the hospital cafeteria and helped thousands of people develop healthier eating habits without changing their willpower or motivation in the slightest way.

                      Here’s what happened…

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                      Thorndike and her team proposed that by changing the environment and the way that food was displayed in the cafeteria, they could get people to eat healthier without thinking about it. There were multiple phases of the experiment, but the portion that really interested me focused on what Thorndike refers to as “choice architecture.”

                      Choice architecture is just a fancy word for “changing the way the food and drinks are displayed.” But, as it turns out, it makes a big difference.

                      The Impact of Choice Architecture

                      The researchers started by changing the choice architecture of the drinks in the cafeteria. Originally, there were three main refrigerators, all of which were filled with soda. The researchers made sure that water was added to each of those units and also placed baskets of bottled water throughout the room.

                      The image below depicts what the room looked like before the changes (Figure A) and after the changes (Figure B). The dark boxes indicate areas where bottled water is available.

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                      choice-architecture

                        What happened?

                        Over the next 3 months, the number of soda sales dropped by 11.4 percent. Meanwhile, bottled water sales increased by 25.8 percent. Similar adjustments and results were made with food options. Nobody said a word to the visitors who ate at the cafeteria. The researchers simply changed the environment and people naturally followed suit.

                        The usual argument for sticking to better habits is that you need more willpower, motivation and discipline. But studies like this one showcase just how important your environment can be for guiding behavior.

                        Environment design becomes even more important when you understand the daily fluctuation of willpower.

                        The Willpower Muscle

                        Decades of research have discovered that willpower is not something you have or don’t have, but rather it is a resource that can be used up and restored. Like tired muscles at the end of a workout, your willpower can become depleted if you use it too much. Much of this research is explained in excellent books like The Willpower Instinct by Kelly McGonigal and Willpower by Roy Baumeister and John Tierney.

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                        A classic example can be found by looking at college students. During finals week, students use all of their willpower to study and everything else collapses as a result. People eat whatever they can find, students who haven’t smoked all semester start lighting up outside the library, and many people can’t even muster the strength to change out of their sweatpants. There is only so much willpower to go around.

                        We don’t typically think about willpower and motivation as a finite resource that is impacted by all of the things we do throughout the day, but that’s exactly how it works.

                        And this is where choice architecture and willpower come together.

                        Choice Architecture in Everyday Life

                        When your willpower is depleted, you are even more likely to make decisions based on the environment around you. After all, if you’re feeling drained, stressed or overwhelmed then you’re not going to go through a lot of effort to cook a healthy dinner or fit in a workout. You’ll grab whatever is easiest.

                        And that means that if you take just a little bit of time today to organize your room, your office, your kitchen, and other areas, then that adjustment in choice architecture can guide you towards better choices even when your willpower is fading.

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                        For example, in Richard Thaler’s best-selling book, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness, he discusses research that reveals that items on the top shelf of supermarkets (near eye level) tend to sell more than items on lower shelves.

                        It’s easy to apply this discovery to everyday life: simply place healthier foods in more visible spots in your refrigerator, pantry, and around the kitchen. Meanwhile, you can tuck away cookies, treats, and other unhealthy choices down on the lower shelves. This is one way to use choice architecture to make it more likely that you’ll grab healthy food, even when your willpower is fading. It helps your goal setting by allowing you to decide where to place your attention.

                        To Change Your Behavior, Change Your Environment

                        Like the visitors in the hospital cafeteria, choice architecture can help you automatically do the right thing without worrying about willpower or motivation. If you design your environment to make the default choice a better one, then it’s more likely that you’ll make a good choice now and have more willpower leftover for later.

                        Environment design works. Talking about tiny changes like moving your healthy foods to a more visible shelf might seem insignificant, but imagine the impact of making dozens of these changes and living in an environment designed to make the good behaviors easier and the bad behaviors harder.

                        When you’re surrounded by better choices, it’s a lot easier to make a good one.

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