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Having an Upset Stomach? Here Are 10 Probiotic Foods That Can Make You Feel Better!

Having an Upset Stomach? Here Are 10 Probiotic Foods That Can Make You Feel Better!

Does your meal seem to hang around inside you longer than you’d like?

Does it feel like your food is killing you from the inside out?

Have you forgotten what it’s like to eat whatever you want without a stomach ache or a prolonged stay in the bathroom?

If this is you, it sounds like your digestive system might be in health limbo. And that’s not something you should overlook or consider normal.

If you get an upset stomach after eating, you might blame it on the food, how it was cooked, how it tastes, or the fact that you might just be under the weather. But if you start to notice that your stomach gets angry no matter what or when you eat, it might not be the food that’s giving you issues, but rather a lack of other foods.

Probiotics have been making headlines in recent years, claiming to offer a variety of health benefits ranging from immune system support to digestive system rebalancing. And it’s true -probiotics can do both of those things, and more.

However, it’s important to note that, just like vitamins and minerals, it’s essential that you get your probiotics naturally – not in supplement form. And you can get all the probiotics your body needs when you eat enough probiotic foods.

What are probiotic foods and how do they help digestive issues?

Probiotics are known as “good” bacteria that are naturally found in your digestive tract. They are essential in keeping bad bacteria in check, and help your body break down food and nutrients.

However, good bacteria can become damaged or wiped out from your digestion system. And when that happens, you end up suffering every time you eat until you can replenish your probiotic stockpile.

Taking antibiotics kills all bacteria, good and bad, within your body until the targeted infection is demolished. This means that after your round of antibiotics is finished, you have to rebuild your good bacteria colony.

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In addition, eating foods that don’t contain enough good bacteria can lead to an imbalance in your digestive tract, making it easy for bad bacteria to take over operations. Your intestines are lined with “adherence” sites, or places where bacteria can attach. The more good flora you have latched in your intestinal track, the fewer places bad bacteria will have to make themselves a home.

Probiotics have been known for helping with issues like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), stomach aches, cramping, diarrhea, constipation, and other digestive issues. And if you find yourself suffering from any of these issues, adding rich probiotic foods into your diet could provide a natural relief.

10 Probiotic Foods To Quell Digestive Issues

1. Yogurt

    Yogurt provide a hearty source of live bacteria cultures, including Lactobacillus and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Science suggests that the real benefits from eating yogurt come from organic varieties of grass-fed animals and forgoing the pasteurization process.

    In addition to digestive help, yogurt is also an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D.

    Try this delicious recipe for a tasty yogurt breakfast parfait.

    2. Kimchi

      Popular in Korea, Kimchi is a fermented side dish made mostly from fermented vegetables, namely cabbage. Fermented foods are well known to contain live bacteria cultures that can help ease digestive issues.

      You can buy kimchi in some supermarkets, or make your own kimchi at home with this recipe.

      3. Kombucha

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        Sticking to the fermented foods list, kombucha is a specially brewed tea that undergoes a fermentation process. Once the tea is brewed, it is stored in containers with a SCOBY, or live bacteria-filled disc. You can infuse kombucha with a variety of flavors, like fruits or ginger, to offset the vinegar-like taste.

        People who drink kombucha have also seen an increase in other areas of their health, such as weight loss and more energy.

        Buying kombucha in the store usually costs upwards of $3 for a 16-oz bottle. It’s much cheaper to make your own, plus you can flavor it any way you wish.

        4. Tempeh

          Tempeh is a meat alternative made from soybeans and chock full of probiotics. You can add tempeh to salads, cook it on the grill, bake it, or sautee it.

          Try this recipe for a grilled tempeh burger – your taste buds might not know the difference.

          5. Miso

            If you’ve ever been to a Japanese restaurant, chances are you’ve tried Miso soup. Miso is a spice made from fermented soybeans, rice, barley or rye. The resulting product is teeming with lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria.

            In addition to helping with digestion, miso is thought to help alkalinize the body and prevent harmful effects from carcinogens.

            Try making your own miso soup at home with this recipe.

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            6. Kefir

              If yogurt were a drink, it would be kefir. This dairy product comes from combining goat’s milk with fermented kefir grains, resulting in a high concentration of lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria. It’s also a good source of antioxidants.

              You can find organic kefir in most grocery stores. If you don’t like the taste of it by itself, here are 5 ways to use kefir as a milk substitute.

              7. Sauerkraut

                A common find in Europe, sauerkraut is the technical term for fermented cabbage. Its sour taste helps to activate your saliva glands, which wakes up your digestive juices. And because it’s fermented, it’s also covered with live bacteria cultures.

                Sauerkraut has been thought to relieve allergy symptoms. It’s also a good source of vitamins A, B, C, and K.

                When using sauerkraut in cooking, it’s best not to heat it, as the heat can damage or kill the good bacteria. Instead, try using it to top off your hot dog, eat it as a side dish, or get a double dose of probiotics with this recipe for mango-kimchi salad.

                8. Apple Cider Vinegar

                  Raw, unpasteurized apple cider vinegar comes from fermented apple juice. As long as you are drinking it raw, you are essentially drinking “the mother,” that is, all the enzymes, proteins, and probiotics that enter the liquid during the fermentation period.

                  In addition to its probiotics, apple cider vinegar may help you lose weight by keeping your appetite in check. It could also help in lowering blood sugar.

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                  For many people, apple cider vinegar doesn’t go down too well on its own. Instead, try this recipe that mixes it with honey.

                  9. Sourdough Bread

                    Compared to other breads, sourdough contains a higher proportion of Lactobacillus to yeast. This leads to a higher production of lactic acid, which leads to less phytic acid, a potentially dangerous acid that can impact digestion. It also helps to “predigest” starches in the grains, which means less work for your body.

                    In addition, sourdough bread is a better option for people trying to lose weight or have high blood sugar, as the heat during baking reduces the availability of starch. It’s also chock full of good stuff like antioxidants, vitamins B1-B6, B12, zinc, potassium, and a host of other things your body needs.

                    Bake your own sourdough loaf with this recipe.

                    10. Pickles

                      Pickles have been long known to hold a treasure trove of probiotics, but it’s not just pickled cucumbers. Whatever vegetables you can pickle, such as beets or olives, you can score a quality source of good bacteria.

                      Pickling foods also help to retain important vitamins, such as A, D, E, and K.

                      Here’s how to pickle your own vegetables at home.

                      If you’re tired to heading straight to the bathroom after every meal, and want to feel more like your old self, a few simple adjustments to your diet could be all you need to conquer digestive problems. And it doesn’t mean giving up everything you love to eat.

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                      Alli Hill

                      Lifestyle Writer and Marketing Consultant

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                      Last Updated on September 18, 2020

                      7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

                      7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

                      Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

                      Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

                      1. Exercise Daily

                      It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

                      If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

                      Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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                      If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

                      2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

                      Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

                      One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

                      This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

                      3. Acknowledge Your Limits

                      Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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                      Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

                      Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

                      4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

                      Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

                      The basic nutritional advice includes:

                      • Eat unprocessed foods
                      • Eat more veggies
                      • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
                      • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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                      Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

                        5. Watch Out for Travel

                        Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

                        This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

                        If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

                        6. Start Slow

                        Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

                        If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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                        7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

                        Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

                        My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

                        If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

                        I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

                        Final Thoughts

                        Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

                        Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

                        More Tips on Getting in Shape

                        Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

                        Reference

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