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10 High Protein Low Fat Foods That All Gym People Need In Their Diet

10 High Protein Low Fat Foods That All Gym People Need In Their Diet

If you are among active individuals seeking the best results from your exercise routine, diet, and lifestyle, the right balance of protein, carbohydrates, and low-fat foods are key factors that can provide you with the right nutrients and the most energy with few negative effects. Proteins are especially important for gym goers because they’re essential for building and repairing muscles and maintaining glycogen levels that support energy. That’s why you probably overheard fellow gym members talking about their high-protein, low-fat foods.

When you start a workout regimen, many concerns will come up. Will you be able to maintain muscle mass at a calorie deficit? Is it possible to maintain/gain muscle while losing fat? How do you maximize your performance at the gym? And on many days you will find yourself wondering how to recover from that muscle soreness as fast as possible. The answer to all these questions is protein.

Diet Essentials for fitness enthusiasts

  • High protein foods are very filling; they help build muscle, reduce cravings and fire up weight loss. Proteins are the most essential macronutrient for gym goers. In contrast, high-fat foods can slow down digestion and make food sit in your stomach for too long especially just before a workout.
  • Breakfast is extremely important to pump you full of energy at the beginning of your day. Complex carbohydrates, lean protein, healthy fats, and a variety of fruits and vegetables can all help boost energy and maximize nutrient levels. The most important macros to include in your breakfast, however, are proteins and complex carbohydrates.
  • Foods that support healthy brain functions should be a staple in every healthy diet. The best brain foods are those rich in omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants. These include wild caught salmon, blueberries, nuts and seeds and avocados.

Do you feel tired easily during workouts?

  • If so, your body may be missing a substance called creatine to help top up energy levels. Creative is also leaked out of the muscles during workouts. This increases a condition called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)
  • Creatine is found in high-protein foods such as red meat or in protein powders. 3-5 grams before and after working out provides that extra boost of energy.

How much protein you really need?

If you have been doing your fitness research, odds are you have heard about the importance of protein from every single source. Many exercisers, especially those focusing on weight training, consume large amounts of protein in every meal. This probably left you wondering about your protein needs.

  • The average adult needs at least 1 gram per pound of body weight. For example, if you weigh 175 pounds, you need between 140-227 grams of protein per day.
  • Eating high-protein foods increases the number of calories your body naturally burns each day and is the key factor in preserving lean muscle while burning fat.
  • During workouts, small tearing occurs in your muscles, so you need the amino acids in protein to repair and rebuild those muscles, and that’s how they become bigger and stronger.
  • If this damage is not repaired, the body will use muscle tone and bone minerals to substitute, so instead of losing fat, you end up losing muscle mass.

Here are TOP 10 high-protein low fat foods you can add to your diet:

1. Greek Yogurt (23 g. per 8oz. Serving)

    • Twice as much protein as regular yogurt
    • Probiotics and calcium help build and strengthen bone mass

    2. Whey Protein (24 g. per scoop) (Add to shakes before and after workouts)

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      • Clean, fast digesting, muscle building protein
      • Low in calories, high in amino acids

      3. Steak (Top or Bottom Round) (23 g. per 3 oz. Serving)

        • Leaner cuts provide 1 gram of protein for every 11 calories consumed when compared to ribeye.

        4. Turkey Breast (24 g. per 3 oz. Serving)

          • Low fat
          • Rich in zinc, potassium, zinc, vitamin B6 and niacin, both essential for energy
          • Can help lower cholesterol

          5. Yellow Fin Tuna (25 g. per 3 oz. Servi ng)

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            • B vitamins, and selenium (antioxidant)

            6. Sockeye Salmon (Wild) (23 g. per 3 oz. Serving)

              • One of the best brain foods
              • Provides 25% more protein than raised salmon
              • Rich in omega-3 fatty acids

              7. Navy Beans (Canned) (20g. Per 3 oz. Serving)

                • Provides 13g. Dietary fiber

                8. Jerky (13g. Per 1 oz. Serving)

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                  • Builds muscle
                  • Rich in vitamin B and minerals

                  9. Tofu (12 g. per 3oz. Serving)

                    • Has all 8 amino acids
                    • High in calcium, selenium, copper, iron and vitamin B1

                    10. Quinoa (8 g. Per 1 cup serving)

                      • The only plant food with a full chain of amino acids
                      • Rich in fiber, manganese, magnesium, phosphorous, etc.

                      Start Off With This Delicious Recipe Maybe?

                      Baked Salmon with Quinoa and Vegetables

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                        INGREDIENTS
                        Quinoa-
                        • 1 cup quinoa uncooked, truRoots Organic
                        • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
                        • 3/4 cup english cucumbers diced, seeded
                        • 1 cup cherry tomatoes sliced in half
                        • 1/4 cup red onion finely diced
                        • 4 basil leaves thinly sliced
                        • zest of one lemon
                        Salmon-
                        • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
                        • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
                        • 1 teaspoon cumin
                        • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
                        • 20 ounces salmon fillets (four 5-ounce pieces)
                        • 8 lemon wedges
                        • 1/4 cup parsley chopped fresh
                        INSTRUCTIONS
                        1. In a medium saucepan with a lid, bring 1 cup quinoa, 2 cups of water and ½ teaspoon salt to a boil. Cover and reduce to a simmer, cooking about 20 minutes or according to package directions until quinoa is light and fluffy. Turn off heat and let sit for at least 5 minutes covered before serving. Right before serving mix in the cucumbers, tomatoes, onions, basil and lemon zest. Meanwhile, make the salmon.
                        2. In a small bowl combine salt, pepper, cumin and paprika. Line a sheet pan or glass dish with foil and lightly grease with olive oil or nonstick cooking spray. Transfer salmon fillets to pan. Evenly coat the surface of each fillet with about ½ teaspoon of the spice mixture.
                        3. Place the lemon wedges on the edge of the pan with salmon.
                        4. Broil on high with the rack placed in the lower third of the oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until salmon is cooked and flakes apart easily with a fork. Sprinkle with parsley and serve with roasted lemon wedges and vegetable quinoa.

                        Smart Eating Plans Make Your Workout More Effective! 

                        Your workout regimen can only do so much alone. A smart eating plan has to go hand in hand with your exercise to ensure that your gym efforts front go to waste. A healthy diet plan that is full of high-protein, low-fat foods will help you maintain muscle mass, increase energy levels, recover quickly, stay full longer and lose that stubborn fat.

                        Bibliography

                        Armstrong, R. B., 1984. Mechanisms of exercise-induced delayed onset muscular soreness: A brief review. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 16 (6), 529-38 and

                        Belnave, C. D., & Thompson, M. W. 1993 Effects of training on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Journal of Applied Physiology, 75 (4), 1545-51

                        Coach Magazine, UK – Creatin: All you need to know. February 17, 2017

                        Featured photo credit: http://www.coachmag.co.uk/ via google.com

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                        Ella James

                        Health and Fitness Writer

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                        Last Updated on September 18, 2020

                        7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

                        7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

                        Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

                        Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

                        1. Exercise Daily

                        It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

                        If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

                        Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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                        If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

                        2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

                        Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

                        One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

                        This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

                        3. Acknowledge Your Limits

                        Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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                        Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

                        Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

                        4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

                        Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

                        The basic nutritional advice includes:

                        • Eat unprocessed foods
                        • Eat more veggies
                        • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
                        • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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                        Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

                          5. Watch Out for Travel

                          Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

                          This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

                          If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

                          6. Start Slow

                          Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

                          If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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                          7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

                          Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

                          My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

                          If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

                          I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

                          Final Thoughts

                          Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

                          Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

                          More Tips on Getting in Shape

                          Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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