Advertising
Advertising

Get Prepared for These Questions When You Quit Your Job, or You May Get into Trouble

Get Prepared for These Questions When You Quit Your Job, or You May Get into Trouble

Many organisations complain about losing some of their best employees. The truth is that people don’t leave jobs, they leave one organization to another. Knowing this, organisations have put in place mechanisms that allow them to hear the perspective of their outgoing staff. This allows them to receive meaningful and progressive feedback from their outgoing staff. In addition, it builds in the employee the sense that the organisation cares.

Organisations and employer of labor will have to deal with losing an employee at some point. This moment calls for both parties to reflect on their time together rather than focus only on benefit and off-boarding matters. However, for the outgoing staff, it’s important that you are aware of this phase as you prepare to leave an organisation. Here are 10 most common question you will be asked when you quit your job:

1. What do you want from your job, career and life?

This is one of the most common questions in an exit interview. It is an indirect way for the employers to know why you are leaving. Your fulfilment on a job depends on what you yearn for from your, job, life and career. The employer wants to know if your current job lacks the things needed to fulfil your deep aspirations. There are no right or wrong answers to this question. The most important thing is to be open and honest in revealing what you really want out of your job or career. Use this opportunity to talk about your deep motivation. A good example might be:

Advertising

“Learning new things has always been a great motivator for me. I like having a job that provides me with the opportunity to learn something new or a new way to look at a problem.”

What you don’t want to do is associating your response to your personal issues like the desire to pay off credit card debts or student loans.

2. Where are you going?

Quitting your current job implies that you have an alternative to rely on. So, don’t be surprised if this is one of the questions that comes up in your exit interview. You need to be ready with an answer to this question before you head for the exit interview. Your current employer may like to know where you are going to have an insight into your reason for quitting. Are you quitting your current job for a higher paying one or you want to go float your company? The answer to this question will be generic depending on the reason behind decision to quit. However, it is important for you to be truthful with your response. Giving an honest answer might help the employer improve their approach to employees.

Advertising

3. Why did you accept the new job?

Your employer knows that you are leaving them for another company and you have a right to do so. Letting your employer know the biggest reason for accepting your new job will help them measure how well they are doing against other companies. You have the right to withhold your reasons. However, telling your boss the real reason will help them know how well they are doing and things that might need improvement.

4. What qualities should we look out for in your replacement?

No one knows your job like you do, so don’t be surprised if a question like this comes up in your exit interview. Feel free to tell your HR some of the factors to look for in your replacement. This will help your company hire a replacement that fits the role. An honest answer will also indicate you still have their best interest at heart as well.

5. Were you able to share your challenges with your manager?

This question is helpful in evaluating the interpersonal relation skill of the manger. It could further help the organisation put in place professional development training for the manager. In my opinion, I will recommend an honest answer to avoid a repetition of poor manager to employee relationship.

Advertising

6. What five things you will like to see in this organization?

In most cases, employee and manager mismatch have been the common reasons why employee leave a job. If this is not the reason the employee is leaving, there is always room for improvement. The organisation always wants a prioritized feedback from their employee by asking them to name five things they will like to see. In doing so, they can tap into the core perspective of the employee about the organisation. I will employ an honest answer from the employee at this point because it’s all about improving the workplace for another person who could be our friend.

7. Were you updated on new developments in the company?

Transparency is an important element at the work place and its endearing to the millennia’s. This is an opportunity for the organisation to know how you rate them when it comes to open door policy at the workplace. They want to know if transparency shone from the management team to the employee or you as an employee felt left out. I felt left out on my previous job and in most cases, I never knew what the company was up to. The answer to this question will help the organisation review their policy and perhaps is one of the reasons you are losing the best staff. This is an opportunity to let the organisation know are inclusive their policy is.

8. Were you given the resources to perform your task?

The productivity of an organisation lies in the quality of its staff. Every organisation values a productive work force. However, cases may arise when an employee was not adequately equipped for the role there by resulting in low productivity. Find out what the organisation is doing right or wrong in terms of providing necessary support for their staff is crucial. This will help them note an area that needs improvement. Perhaps more training courses or supervision will be needed in the subsequent situation. This is an opportunity to recommend training, tools and suggestion on how their resource pool can be improved.

Advertising

9. What were the good and bad moments?

This question can help understand some of the challenges your employees are facing while on the job. It can also point to what makes them feel successful. Perhaps the organisation is to strict or non-evolving and missing the mark. An honest answer will be appreciated as it will further help the organisation improve and create an environment that promotes success.

10. What did you like about the organisation?

It is also important for an organisation to note what they are doing well. What the employees like about them. These are things and organisation should build upon and fortify in its policy. For instance, I enjoyed the group presentation session at my previous place of work because it allows bounce ideas around. It is imperative to give a feedback on the good things the organisation is doing well so that they can continue to build on it.

More by this author

Amber McNaught

Freelance Writer

7 Awesome Natural Energy Boosters That Will Make You Forget Energy Drinks Get Prepared for These Questions When You Quit Your Job, or You May Get into Trouble 6 Rules Successful People Live By to Learn Faster and Better Than Everyone Else What Are Social Norms? You Follow Them Every Day Without Even Noticing Apart From “Get Well Soon”, What Else Can You Say to People Who’re Sick?

Trending in Productivity

1 22 Best Habit Tracking Apps You Need in 2021 2 6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity 3 How to Become a Person Who Can Visualize Results 4 7 Ways to Eliminate Your Excuses 5 4 Effective Ways To Collaborate With Your Team

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 25, 2021

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

Advertising

2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

3. Recognize actions that waste time.

Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

Advertising

Advertising

4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

Advertising

6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

Read Next