Advertising
Advertising

How I Get More Job Offers Than Others By Writing a Thank You Email

How I Get More Job Offers Than Others By Writing a Thank You Email

It may be in the majority’s mind that the interview is the final stage of a recruitment process. Once you give it all in the interview, the next thing to do is to sit and wait.

Well, it isn’t. There’s one more thing you can do. And it can help you stand out from the crowd. The thank you letter. It can do way more than a mere expression of gratitude and appreciation.

The Power of Thank You Emails You Have Never Imagined

In the book How to write better resumes and cover letters by Patricia K. Criscito, she mentioned a survey revealing less than 20% applicants write a thank you letter after an interview.

Advertising

However, most importantly, 94% of the recruiters said that a thank you letter would increase the chance of getting the job, or keeping the applicants in the contest. It seems that most applicants may have missed the most lethal weapon in their pursuit of dream jobs!

A carefully written thank you letter is not only an act of good manner. It is actually another stage for you to present yourselves and provide anything you think is important but left unspoken in the interview.

Besides, thank you letters can also remind the interviewers of your existence, with an additional good impression through your proactive expression of gratitude!

Advertising

Dos and Don’ts to Turn Your Thank You Letter into a Winning Bet

Start the letter with a clear purpose, “Thank you” + [Subject]

You can’t imagine how many spamming and phishing emails are sent to a company every day. If you don’t want your email to be treated as one of them, state clearly your purpose in the subject! Before you try to maximise your chance of getting the job, it’s best to avoid your effort being wasted.

Send an individual letter to each interviewer

Recall what you have talked about with every interviewer respectively and write about the individual connection with each of them. Never send the exact same message to all the interviewers. The mail will most likely be circulated around and it is easy to find out about the copy-and-paste mail you prepared. Then your thank you letter will do you more harm than good.

Reiterate the matters you talekd about with the interviewers

On one hand, it helps the interviewers recognise you as they may have dealt with hundreds of applicants a day. On the other hand, you can add what you think you should have said in the interview. It furthers shows how you are potentially a good match for the position.

Advertising

Write to the Interviewers, NOT anyone else.

Addressing the wrong people at very least doesn’t help you. In the worst case scenario, it can kill your chance if the job. The interviewers are the only employers in the company that know you. Writing to anyone else serves no purpose at all, regardless of the position they are in.

Therefore, remember to take note of the full name and position of the interviewers during the interview!

Send your letter as soon as possible, preferably within 24 hours

Think from the interviewers’ perspective. You have met hundreds of unfamiliar faces a day. Can you still recognise one of them after a day or two? Therefore, it is best to send the letter promptly while their memory is still fresh and they have a clue of who you are.

Advertising

Besides, they could be making the decision shortly after the interview. Then your thank you letter will be unable to make any positive impact.

Proofread the letter. Make sure it is mistake-free.

Imagine you receive a letter full of grammatical mistakes. On one hand, you find it hard to comprehend. On the other hand, you doubt the sincerity of the sender, thinking that he or she is not serious about the letter or is a very careless person.

In either case, you don’t want to be that sender. So proofread your letter. If possible, ask someone else to have a look too. They will probably discover some mistakes you overlooked.

Never correct the mistakes you made in the interview.

Don’t try to correct what you thought was inappropriate in the interview. The interviewer may have well forgotten about it. Bringing it up again simply reminds them that you did not perform well in the interview. Focus on the good and leave aside the bad.

Write in formal language. Don’t use the casual Internet language.

Despite that you write it in an email, keep all the writing in a formal style. It is a kind of respect to everyone. And after all, it is all part of a formal business setting. Stick to it. Don’t use any Internet acronyms or slangs. Memes are prohibited. Keep it formal.

More by this author

Jeffrey Lau

Editor. Sport Lover. Animal Lover.

A Dull Resume Can Kill Your Job Chances, Here’s How You Can Write an Appealing One The Secret to Effective Conflict Resolution: The IBR Approach 20 Most Fun Jobs in the World (That Also Pay Well) How to Think Positive Every Day How Our Brains Trick Us into Believing the Wrong Things

Trending in Productivity

1 10 Huge Differences Between a Boss And a Leader 2 Why Perspective Taking Is an Essential Skill for Success 3 How to Take Calculated Risk to Achieve Success 4 How to Write SMART Goals (With SMART Goals Templates) 5 How to Give Constructive Feedback in the Workplace

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on June 3, 2020

How to Write SMART Goals (With SMART Goals Templates)

How to Write SMART Goals (With SMART Goals Templates)

Everyone needs a goal. Whether it’s in a business context or for personal development, having goals help you strive towards something you want to accomplish. It prevents you from wandering around aimlessly without a purpose.

But there are good ways to write goals and there are bad ways. If you want to ensure you’re doing the former, keep reading to find out how a SMART goals template can help you with it.

The following video is a summary of how you can write SMART goals effectively:

What Are SMART Goals?

SMART Goals

refer to a way of writing down goals that follow a specific criteria. The earliest known use of the term was by George T. Doran in the November 1981 issue of Management Review, however, it is often associated with Peter Drucker’s management by objectives concept.[1]

SMART is an acronym that stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. There are other variations where certain letters stand for other things such as “achievable” instead of attainable, and “realistic” instead of relevant.

Advertising

What separates a SMART goal from a non-SMART goal is that, while a non-SMART goal can be vague and ill-defined, a SMART goal is actionable and can get you results. It sets you up for success and gives you a clear focus to work towards.

And with SMART goals comes a SMART goals template. So, how do you write according to this template?

How to Write Smart Goals Using a SMART Goals Template

For every idea or desire to come to fruition, it needs a plan in place to make it happen. And to get started on a plan, you need to set a goal for it.

The beauty of writing goals according to a SMART goals template is that it can be applied to your personal or professional life.

If it’s your job to establish goals for your team, then you know you have a lot of responsibility weighing on your shoulders. The outcome of whether or not your team accomplishes what’s expected of them can be hugely dependant on the goals you set for them. So, naturally, you want to get it right.

On a personal level, setting goals for yourself is easy, but actually following through with them is the tricky part. According to a study by Mark Murphy about goal setting, participants who vividly described their goals were 1.2 to 1.4 times more likely to successfully achieve their goals.[2] Which goes to show that if you’re clear about your goals, you can have a higher chance of actually accomplishing them.

Advertising

Adhering to a SMART goals template can help you with writing clear goals. So, without further ado, here’s how to write SMART goals with a SMART goals template:

Specific

First and foremost, your goal has to be specific. Be as clear and concise as possible because whether it’s your team or yourself, whoever has to carry out the objective needs to be able to determine exactly what it is they are required to do.

To ensure your goal is as specific as it can be, consider the Ws:

  • Who = who is involved in executing this goal?
  • What = what exactly do I want to accomplish?
  • Where = if there’s a fixed location, where will it happen?
  • When = when should it be done by? (more on deadline under “time-bound”)
  • Why = why do I want to achieve this?

Measurable

The only way to know whether or not your goal was successful is to ensure it is measurable. Adding numbers to a goal can help you or your team weigh up whether or not expectations were met and the outcome was triumphant.

For example, “Go to the gym twice a week for the next six months” is a stronger goal to strive for than simply, “Go to the gym more often”.

Setting milestone throughout your process can also help you to reassess progress as you go along.

Advertising

Attainable

The next important thing to keep in mind when using a SMART goals template is to ensure your goal is attainable. It’s great to have big dreams but you want your goals to be within the realms of possibility, so that you have a higher chance of actually accomplishing them.

But that doesn’t mean your goal shouldn’t be challenging. You want your goal to be achievable while at the same time test your skills.

Relevant

For obvious reasons, your goal has to be relevant. It has to align with business objectives or with your personal aspirations or else, what’s the point of doing it?

A SMART goal needs to be applicable and important to you, your team, or your overall business agenda. It needs to be able to steer you forward and motivate you to achieve it, which it can if it holds purpose to something you believe in.

Time-Bound

The last factor of the SMART goals template is time-bound (also known as “timely”). Your goal needs a deadline, because without one, it’s less likely to be accomplished.

A deadline provides a sense of urgency that can motivate you or your team to strive towards the end. The amount of time you allocate should be realistic. Don’t give yourself—or your team—only one week if it takes three weeks to actually complete it. You want to set a challenge but you don’t want to risk over stress or burn out.

Advertising

Benefits of Using a SMART Goals Template

Writing your goals following a SMART goals template provides you with a clearer focus. It communicates what the goal needs to achieve without any fuss.

With a clear aim, it can give you a better idea of what success is supposed to look like. It also makes it easier to monitor progress, so you’re aware whether or not you’re on the right path.

It can also make it easier to identify bottlenecks or missed targets while you’re delivering the goal. This gives you enough time to rectify any problems so you can get back on track.

The Bottom Line

Writing goals is seemingly not a difficult thing to do. However, if you want it to be as effective as it can be, then there’s more to it than meets the eye.

By following a SMART goals template, you can establish a more concrete foundation of goal setting. It will ensure your goal is specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound—attributes that cover the necessities of an effectively written goal.

More Tips About Goals Setting

Featured photo credit: Estée Janssens via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next