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30 Low Stress Jobs to Live a Peaceful Life

30 Low Stress Jobs to Live a Peaceful Life

For a lot of us, our jobs take up most of our waking hours. Very often, it can feel like the stress that comes with the pay is overwhelming, and we’ll start to wonder if we should be doing something else with our lives. Here are 30 low stress jobs, according to the Occupational Information Network Database. The database calculates a stress tolerance score for each job on a scale of 0 to 100, 0 being the lowest stress level.[1] Hopefully you will find some pleasant surprises, as well as some inspiration from the list.

Geoscientists

    Credit: Mike Beauregard

    Stress Tolerance Score: 63

    Annual Salary: US$89,700

    Job Description: Conduct fieldwork or laboratory research, analyze physical aspects of the Earth such as composition and structure

    Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

    Glass Blowers

      Credit: Ben Snooks

      Stress Tolerance Score: 62

      Annual Salary: US$29,630

      Job Description: Heat glass and shape molten glass into glassware, inspect products for quality

      Education Requirements: Vocational training or apprenticeship

      Applications Software Developers

        Credit: hackNY.org

        Stress Tolerance Score: 61

        Annual Salary: US$98,260

        Job Description: Create and develop computer applications software, update applications software and systems, analyze data on performance and user experience

        Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

        Proofreaders

          Credit: Merlijn Hoek

          Stress Tolerance Score: 61

          Annual Salary: US$35,630

          Job Description: Check for and correct grammatical, typographical, or style errors in copies

          Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

          Physicists

            Credit: m01229

            Stress Tolerance Score: 61

            Annual Salary: US$111,580

            Job Description: Develop theories of observed physical phenomena, conduct experiments, publish findings in academic journals

            Education Requirements: Graduate degree

            Solar Energy Systems Engineers

              Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

              Stress Tolerance Score: 61

              Annual Salary: US$95,900

              Job Description: Design and evaluate solar projects for residential, commercial, or industrial customers, such as water heating systems

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              Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

              Bakers

                Credit: Julia Manzerova

                Stress Tolerance Score: 73

                Annual Salary: US$24,170

                Job Description: Handle ovens and other machines to produce baked goods from measured ingredients

                Education Requirements: High school diploma, or apprenticeship

                Dental Hygienists

                  Credit: Myfuture.com

                  Stress Tolerance Score: 71

                  Annual Salary: US$72,330

                  Job Description: Examine gums, clean apparatus, manage medical histories

                  Education Requirements: Vocational schools training

                  Post-secondary Psychology Teachers

                    Credit: Joby Elliott

                    Stress Tolerance Score: 71

                    Annual Salary: US$70,260

                    Job Description: Prepare course materials, give lectures to students, grade assignments (may include laboratory work) and exams, conduct research

                    Education Requirements: Graduate degree

                    Librarians

                      Credit: Enokson

                      Stress Tolerance Score: 70

                      Annual Salary: US$56,880

                      Job Description: Assist patrons in locating needed information, acquire, catalog, and maintain library materials

                      Education Requirements: Graduate degree

                      Art Directors

                        Credit: David Schroeder

                        Stress Tolerance Score: 69

                        Annual Salary: US$89,760

                        Job Description: Manage projects and budget, formulate and review style of content, present designs to clients

                        Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree (some jobs in the field do not require a degree, depending on experience)

                        Technical Writers

                          Credit: Eelke

                          Stress Tolerance Score: 69

                          Annual Salary: US$70,240

                          Job Description: write, edit, and review technical materials such as equipment manuals, conduct research, communicate with engineers and producers

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                          Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

                          Computer Hardware Engineers

                            Credit: NASA Johnson

                            Stress Tolerance Score: 67

                            Annual Salary: US$111,730

                            Job Description: Design and develop computer equipment, test products, coordinate with software engineers to improve system performance

                            Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

                            Orthodontists

                              Credit: University of the Fraser Valley

                              Stress Tolerance Score: 67

                              Annual Salary: US$187,200+

                              Job Description: Diagnose abnormalities of the teeth and the jaw, apply dental devices in patients’ mouths, review dental medical histories of patients

                              Education Requirements: Post-doctoral training

                              Hand Sewers

                                Credit: Hernán Piñera

                                Stress Tolerance Score: 67

                                Annual Salary: US$23,640

                                Job Description: Use needles and thread to join parts of garments, toys, or books, etc.

                                Education Requirements: Vocational training or apprenticeship, or high school diploma

                                Political Scientists

                                  Credit: tylerhoff

                                  Stress Tolerance Score: 67

                                  Annual Salary: US$99,730

                                  Job Description: Teach political science at tertiary institutions, research government policies, develop theories, publish academic writings

                                  Education Requirements: Graduate degree

                                  Self-enrichment Education Teachers

                                    Credit: swati kulkarni

                                    Stress Tolerance Score: 66

                                    Annual Salary: US$36,680

                                    Job Description: Conduct classes or workshops on self-improvement (courses may not be academic or occupational)

                                    Education Requirements: Related experience in the field, or vocational training

                                    Judicial Law Clerks

                                      Credit: ELSA International

                                      Stress Tolerance Score: 65

                                      Annual Salary: US$50,740

                                      Job Description: Assist judges in court, prepare and review legal documents

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                                      Education Requirements: Professional degree

                                      Mapping Technicians

                                        Credit: alt-n-anela

                                        Stress Tolerance Score: 63

                                        Annual Salary: US$42,010

                                        Job Description: Produce physical and digital maps, check and update maps, develop and maintain geographic or topographic databases

                                        Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

                                        Post-secondary Law Teachers

                                          Credit: dr.coop

                                          Stress Tolerance Score: 63

                                          Annual Salary: US$105,250

                                          Job Description: Teach courses in law, prepare course materials, conduct research

                                          Education Requirements: Graduate degree or professional degree

                                          Operations Research Analysts

                                            Credit: WOCinTech Chat

                                            Stress Tolerance Score: 63

                                            Annual Salary: US$78,630

                                            Job Description: Use mathematical methods to study data, assist in decision-making by the management, prepare project reports including cost, logistics, etc.

                                            Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree or graduate degree (typically master’s)

                                            Massage Therapists

                                              Credit: Nick Webb

                                              Stress Tolerance Score: 63

                                              Annual Salary: US$38,040

                                              Job Description: Apply pressure on clients’ soft tissues and joints, suggest treatment to clients based on medical or physical conditions

                                              Education Requirements: Vocational school training

                                              Economists

                                                Credit: Next Radio

                                                Stress Tolerance Score: 59

                                                Annual Salary: US$99,180

                                                Job Description: Conduct research, develop and test theories of economic issues including market trends and public policies

                                                Education Requirements: Graduate degree

                                                Farmworkers

                                                  Credit: Matthias Hiltner

                                                  Stress Tolerance Score: 58

                                                  Annual Salary: US$19,770

                                                  Job Description: Cultivate crops such as vegetables and grains in the field (manually or using farm vehicles)

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                                                  Education Requirements: Mainly experience in the field

                                                  Travel Agents

                                                    Credit: rawpixel.com

                                                    Stress Tolerance Score: 57

                                                    Annual Salary: US$35,660

                                                    Job Description: Plan and sell tours, evaluate costs of accommodation, transportation, etc. for customers

                                                    Education Requirements: High school diploma and/or experience in the field

                                                    Food Scientists

                                                      Credit: Queen’s University

                                                      Stress Tolerance Score: 56

                                                      Annual Salary: US$65,840

                                                      Job Description: Study the processing and deterioration of foods, design methods of study, inspect quality of raw materials and food products

                                                      Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree

                                                      Remote Sensing Scientists

                                                        Credit: IPAS institute for photonics & advanced sensing

                                                        Stress Tolerance Score: 52

                                                        Annual Salary: US$97,130

                                                        Job Description: Analyze data and design projects for purposes including urban planning and homeland security

                                                        Education Requirements: Graduate degree

                                                        Door-to-door Sales Workers

                                                          Credit: Nick Normal

                                                          Stress Tolerance Score: 51

                                                          Annual Salary: US$22,210

                                                          Job Description: Introduce, explain, and sell goods and services door-to-door

                                                          Education Requirements: Mainly experience in the field (or high school diploma)

                                                          Library Technicians

                                                            Credit: BiblioArchives

                                                            Stress Tolerance Score: 34

                                                            Annual Salary: US$32,310

                                                            Job Description: Assist readers in using the library catalogs and finding needed information, manage materials in the library collection

                                                            Education Requirements: Bachelor’s degree or vocational training

                                                            Models

                                                              Credit: fervent-adepte-de-la-mode

                                                              Stress Tolerance Score: 24

                                                              Annual Salary: US$27,530

                                                              Job Description: Model garments or accessories fashion shows and photoshoots

                                                              Education Requirements: Experience in the field

                                                              Reference

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                                                              Wen Shan

                                                              Proud Philosophy grad. Based in HK.

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                                                              Last Updated on August 16, 2018

                                                              10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

                                                              10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

                                                              When you try to think of a leader at your place of work, you might think of your boss – you know, the supervisor in the tasteful office down the hall.

                                                              However, bosses are not the only leaders in the office, and not every boss has mastered the art of excellent leadership. Maybe the best leader you know is the co-worker sitting at the desk next to yours who is always willing to loan out her stapler and help you problem solve.

                                                              You see, a boss’ main priority is to efficiently cross items off of the corporate to-do list, while a true leader both completes tasks and works to empower and motivate the people he or she interacts with on a daily basis.

                                                              A leader is someone who works to improve things instead of focusing on the negatives. People acknowledge the authority of a boss, but people cherish a true leader.

                                                              Puzzled about what it takes to be a great leader? Let’s take a look at the difference between a boss and a leader, and why cultivating quality leadership skills is essential for people who really want to make a positive impact.

                                                              1. Leaders are compassionate human beings; bosses are cold.

                                                              It can be easy to equate professionalism with robot-like impersonal behavior. Many bosses stay holed up in their offices and barely ever interact with staff.

                                                              Even if your schedule is packed, you should always make time to reach out to the people around you. Remember that when you ask someone to share how they are feeling, you should be prepared to be vulnerable and open in your communication as well.

                                                              Does acting human at the office sound silly? It’s not.

                                                              A lack of compassion in the office leads to psychological turmoil, whereas positive connection leads to healthier staff.[1]

                                                              If people feel that you are being open, honest and compassionate with them, they will feel able to approach your office with what is on their minds, leading to a more productive and stress-free work environment.

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                                                              2. Leaders say “we”; bosses say “I”.

                                                              Practice developing a team-first mentality when thinking and speaking. In meetings, talk about trying to meet deadlines as a team instead of using accusatory “you” phrases. This makes it clear that you are a part of the team, too, and that you are willing to work hard and support your team members.

                                                              Let me explain:

                                                              A “we” mentality shifts the office dynamic from “trying to make the boss happy” to a spirit of teamwork, goal-setting, and accomplishment.

                                                              A “we” mentality allows for the accountability and community that is essential in the modern day workplace.

                                                              3. Leaders develop and invest in people; bosses use people.

                                                              Unfortunately, many office climates involve people using others to get what they want or to climb the corporate ladder. This is another example of the “me first” mentality that is so toxic in both office environments and personal relationships.

                                                              Instead of using others or focusing on your needs, think about how you can help other people grow.

                                                              Use your building blocks of compassion and team-mentality to stay attuned to the needs of others note the areas in which you can help them develop. A great leader wants to see his or her people flourish.

                                                              Make a list of ways you can invest in your team members to help them develop personally and professionally, and then take action!

                                                              4. Leaders respect people; bosses are fear-mongering.

                                                              Earning respect from everyone on your team will take time and commitment, but the rewards are worth every ounce of effort.

                                                              A boss who is a poor leader may try to control the office through fear and bully-like behavior. Employees who are petrified about their performance or who feel overwhelmed and stressed by unfair deadlines are probably working for a boss who uses a fear system instead of a respect system.

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                                                              What’s the bottom line?

                                                              Work to build respect among your team by treating everyone with fairness and kindness. Maintain a positive tone and stay reliable for those who approach you for help.

                                                              5. Leaders give credit where it’s due; bosses only take credits.

                                                              Looking for specific ways to gain respect from your colleagues and employees? There is no better place to start than with the simple act of giving credit where it is due.

                                                              Don’t be tempted to take credit for things you didn’t do, and always go above and beyond to generously acknowledge those who worked on a project and performed well.

                                                              You might be wondering how you can get started:

                                                              • Begin by simply noticing which team member contributes what during your next project at work.
                                                              • If possible, make mental notes. Remember that these notes should not be about ways in which team members are failing, but about ways in which they are excelling.
                                                              • Depending on your leadership style, let people know how well they are doing either in private one-on-one meetings or in a group setting. Be honest and generous in your communication about a person’s performance.

                                                              6. Leaders see delegation as their best friend; bosses see it as an enemy.

                                                              If delegation is a leader’s best friend, then micromanagement is the enemy.

                                                              Delegation equates to trust and micromanagement equates to distrust. Nothing is more frustrating for an employee than feeling that his or her every movement is being critically observed.

                                                              Encourage trust in your office by delegating important tasks and acknowledging that your people are capable, smart individuals who can succeed!

                                                              Delegation is a great way to cash in on the positive benefits of a psychological phenomenon called a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a self-fulfilling prophecy, a person’s expectations of another person can cause the expectations to be fulfilled.[2]

                                                              In other words, if you truly believe that your team member can handle a project or task, he or she is more likely to deliver.

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                                                              Learn how to delegate in my other article:

                                                              How to Delegate Work (the Definitive Guide for Successful Leaders)

                                                              7. Leaders work hard; bosses let others do the work.

                                                              Delegation is not an excuse to get out of hard work. Instead of telling people to go accomplish the hardest work alone, make it clear that you are willing to pitch in and help with the hardest work of all when the need arises.

                                                              Here’s the deal:

                                                              Showing others that you work hard sets the tone for your whole team and will spur them on to greatness.

                                                              The next time you catch yourself telling someone to “go”, a.k.a accomplish a difficult task alone, change your phrasing to “let’s go”, showing that you are totally willing to help and support.

                                                              8. Leaders think long-term; bosses think short-term.

                                                              A leader who only utilizes short-term thinking is someone who cannot be prepared or organized for the future. Your colleagues or staff members need to know that they can trust you to have a handle on things not just this week, but next month or even next year.

                                                              Display your long-term thinking skills in group talks and meetings by sharing long-term hopes or concerns. Create plans for possible scenarios and be prepared for emergencies.

                                                              For example, if you know that you are losing someone on your team in a few months, be prepared to share a clear plan of how you and the remaining team members can best handle the change and workload until someone new is hired.

                                                              9. Leaders are like your colleagues; bosses are just bosses.

                                                              Another word for colleague is collaborator. Make sure your team knows that you are “one of them” and that you want to collaborate or work side by side.

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                                                              Not getting involved in the going ons of the office is a mistake because you will miss out on development and connection opportunities.

                                                              As our regular readers know, I love to remind people of the importance of building routines into each day. Create a routine that encourages you to leave your isolated office and collaborate with others. Spark healthy habits that benefit both you and your co-workers.

                                                              10. Leaders put people first; bosses put results first.

                                                              Bosses without crucial leadership training may focus on process and results instead of people. They may stick to a pre-set systems playbook even when employees voice new ideas or concerns.

                                                              Ignoring people’s opinions for the sake of company tradition like this is never truly beneficial to an organization.

                                                              Here’s what I mean by process over people:

                                                              Some organizations focus on proper structures or systems as their greatest assets instead of people. I believe that people lend real value to an organization, and that focusing on the development of people is a key ingredient for success in leadership.

                                                              Learning to be a leader is an ongoing adventure.

                                                              This list of differences makes it clear that, unlike an ordinary boss, a leader is able to be compassionate, inclusive, generous, and hard-working for the good of the team.

                                                              Instead of being a stereotypical scary or micromanaging-obsessed boss, a quality leader is able to establish an atmosphere of respect and collaboration.

                                                              Whether you are new to your work environment or a seasoned administrator, these leadership traits will help you get a jump start so that you can excel as a leader and positively impact the people around you.

                                                              For more inspiration and guidance, you can even start keeping tabs on some of the world’s top leadership experts. With an adventurous and positive attitude, anyone can learn good leadership.

                                                              Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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