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How to Write a LinkedIn Summary That People Would Stop for You

How to Write a LinkedIn Summary That People Would Stop for You
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According to some estimates,[1] 467 million people use LinkedIn and two new members sign up every second. LinkedIn has become a powerful tool for business success with more than 10 million endorsements so far.

Setting up an account on this platform is vital for your career, but you have to make some effort. In order to succeed, your profile has to be well-crafted and stand out from all others with an unique summary. The problem is, a lot of people have summaries that are too generic, and there is nothing to catch someone’s attention.

Believe me; the problem with bad summaries on LinkedIn is quite common so you shouldn’t despair if you think yours doesn’t meet certain standards.

The good thing is; you can always create a different, improved summary that will catch everyone’s attention. As a social media expert who has helped numerous individuals and businesses to boost the quality of LinkedIn profiles, I bring you some useful tips to create a stellar LinkedIn summary easily.

Most LinkedIn users assume nobody even reads the summary, but that is not true

You are probably wondering why is summary important anyway. Most LinkedIn users assume nobody even reads that section, but that is not true. You should think of your profile on this platform as a type of resume with extra personality. The purpose of the summary is to educate and persuade the reader to want to learn more or even collaborate with you.[2] This section doesn’t only provide more info about your skills; it also reveals how you express yourself. You can learn a lot about a person just by reading how they write about themselves. A stellar summary is like a movie trailer, highlights all the qualities while sending a clear message that you have a lot to offer.

What is wrong why my current summary?

LinkedIn is a powerful social media marketing tool that a lot of us take for granted. We usually assume that just because the idea behind this platform is to form business connections, we are pretty much set up. The reality is different; the quality of your profile determines whether you are a good match for someone’s business, and summary plays a vital role. What is wrong with it? Open your LinkedIn profile and read this section from top to bottom. Finished? Okay, so the chances are high the summary includes some “powerful” verbs, statistics or other data about your accomplishments at previous jobs, awards, and honors. Am I right? Well, there is your answer.

You took the approach that you found most professional, and although summary should demonstrate your skills and info you want others to know, it might make people wonder “What can you do for me, then?” The primary cause of summary-related problems is failing to mention how someone can benefit from collaborating with you. Percentages and other data do seem impressive, but at the end of the day, the reader just wants to read something with more depth. Other sources of the problem include poor structure, grammar and spelling mistakes, generic text.

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How to write a high-quality summary

You’ll be happy to know that all problems mentioned above can be fixed easily. In order to do so, all you have to do is to follow these simple steps.

Step 1

One of the most common pitfalls that people face is not knowing what to write. Take a pen and a piece of paper and write down your qualities and other info that other people should know about. The choice is yours here, you can mention everything from some personal characteristics to why you love your job, what do you do actually and so on. No need to create full sentences at this point, just create a list.

Step 2

Start with a bang! The beginning is always crucial, it’s a hook that catches reader’s attention. You want that person to know more and keep reading summary rather than moving on to something else. For this purpose you can use a question, even a few words with exclamation e.g. Focused! Or maybe you can start off with an interesting fact about you such as Every day I watched my mother/father get ready for work and hoped I would become just like him/her one day, goal-oriented, driven, and kind at the same time.

Step 3

Mention important details to inform readers about yourself and your expertise. Now in the era of micro-influencer marketing letting people know what you can do for them is crucial. Some points to cover include:

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• Important accomplishments e.g. how much money you helped your company save, successful campaigns you carried out, and other details related to your niche

• Values and passions such as optimism, love for yoga and meditation, and things you appreciate. A reader doesn’t read the summary to learn about your work, he/she wants to learn more about you, as a person

• Things you can do better than someone else e.g. I inspire and engage even the most skeptical clients

• Figures and facts when applicable. As mentioned above this is one of the most common problems or pitfalls in summaries. People get caught up in numbers and then their entire summary is made up of percentages. Ideally, this info should account for sentence or two of the entire summary

• What do you offer? What does someone get by working with you? Who can benefit from collaboration with you and why? Answer these questions to let reader know what can you do for them or provide a short list of different specialties

Step 4

End your summary with a call to action.[3] You can use something witty such as “reach out to me if you want to talk about football and technology” or you can submit some links and other info that people can use to contact or learn more about you.

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Mistakes to avoid

• Writing one large paragraph – summaries written this way seems unappealing, and a reader will highly likely skip it. Instead, divide your summary into paragraph and make sure there’s a lot of white space

• Including overused buzzwords – words like passionate, creative, motivated don’t make you stand out. Instead, use synonyms or express yourself in a different manner

• Writing in the third person – while it may seem more professional, this summary is impersonal and doesn’t do its purpose – helping readers to get to know you on a professional and personal level

• Using slang – gonna, wanna, shoulda, coulda don’t belong to your summary. Make sure this section is free of spelling and grammar mistakes

Examples of good summaries

Writing a summary on LinkedIn requires a little bit of effort but it is not the most difficult job in the world. Just find a balance that informs others about your core values and business accomplishments or what you offer for potential collaborators without making it seem like you are bragging or focusing on numbers all the time. Here are examples of three different summaries.

1. Mark Lazen

What makes this summary great is the fact that Mr. Lazen talks about his business accomplishments and provides a glimpse into his witty personality with “I’m the calm one” or “I don’t care who gets the credit, I just want to win”. People who go to his profile can see what he offers and he ends with a nice call to action.

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      2. Paul H. Simon

      This particular summary starts with a relatable introduction that, certainly, catches a reader’s attention. Mr. Simon also discusses his strengths and provides a brief insight into different ways he can help his clients and ends with a call to action by providing contact info where people can reach him.

           

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          High-quality summary on LinkedIn provides a useful insight into your personality and demonstrates different skills you can offer to potential collaborators. In order to get the most out of the summary, it is necessary to compose it properly and this article provided a few tips and tricks you can use.

          Reference

          More by this author

          Vivian Michaels

          DM Expert and Technology Adviser

          Artificial Intelligence Will Not Take Up Half of Our Employment How to Write a LinkedIn Summary That People Would Stop for You

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          Last Updated on July 21, 2021

          The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

          The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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          No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

          Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

          Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

          A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

          Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

          In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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          From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

          A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

          For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

          This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

          The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

          That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

          Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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          The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

          Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

          But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

          The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

          The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

          A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

          For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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          But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

          If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

          For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

          These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

          For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

          How to Make a Reminder Works for You

          Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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          Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

          Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

          My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

          Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

          I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

          More on Building Habits

          Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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          Reference

          [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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