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Bruce Lee’s Letters Reveal How Writing Down Self-Reflections Can Boost Your Personal Growth

Bruce Lee’s Letters Reveal How Writing Down Self-Reflections Can Boost Your Personal Growth

Best known for his films, Bruce Lee was more than an actor – he was a martial artist and philosopher. In the letters he wrote to himself, he revealed just how much he spent time reflecting on his thoughts, his purpose, his goals and his attempt to continually understand himself and evolve.

But what can we learn from his approach to personal growth? Despite our want to improve ourselves we can easily turn to entertainment in our alone time rather than spending this time to self-reflect. It’s this process of self-reflection that can really help with our understanding of self and promote growth.

What Bruce Lee Can Teach Us About The Importance of Self-Reflection

Bruce Lee shows there is an art to writing down our life musings. Many of us feel a sense of accomplishment when we carve out time to sit and write down lists of goals and dreams – maybe even a structured plan to attain them. However, while this is a great way to start self-improvement, there is a problem of whether our progress is slow with no evidence of real insight.

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What we can learn from Bruce Lee’s self-reflections, and more importantly apply to our own self-improvement, is that spending time self-reflecting can allow self-efficacy (our belief in our abilities) to blossom. Self-belief is something we often overlook as the key to success in our personal development, together with being true to ourselves and being willing to make the changes we want in life.

In an extract from his letter, Lee writes:

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    “Recognizing that the power of will is the supreme court over all other departments of my mind, I will exercise it daily, when I need the urge to action for any purpose; and I will form HABIT designed to bring the power of my will into action at least once daily.”

    “I realize the dominating thoughts of my mind will eventually reproduce themselves in outward, physical action, and gradually transform themselves into physical reality; therefore I will concentrate my thoughts for 30 min. daily upon the task of thinking of the person I intend to become, thereby creating in my mind a clear mental picture.”

    It’s his self-reflections that helped him to carve out clear paths and how his daily thoughts and actions truly contributed to his life journey.

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    The Key To Mastering Our Own Self-Reflections

    Making self-reflecting a habit in our own lives can be a game-changer in our own personal growth journey. Writing down our self-reflections on a daily basis will start to improve our understanding of what we’ve learned, allowing us to see how far we’ve come and our potential moving forward.

    From reading Bruce Lee’s letters, personal authenticity and willingness to change are the two key factors that contributed to his self-efficacy.

    So, when penning your thoughts it’s important to keep two things in mind:

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    1. You need to make sure you write as your true, authentic self. By this I mean don’t script what you feel you should be writing, keep it 100% true to your thoughts and feelings as this is the only way to get a full understanding of where you are.

    2. Make sure you keep yourself challenged. The point of self-reflection is to see progression in your thinking and understanding of what you’ve learned – either about yourself or something else. Make changes accordingly. Noticing no real change – whether slight or significant – is a sign you’re off track. Remember, expansion comes from embracing change.

    Anything towards your personal growth and improvement is gold. However, as Bruce Lee shows us, understanding the why behind your thoughts, goals and plans in life is the key to progressing forward on your journey. Meaningful growth comes with expansion and constant discoveries – taking time out to write down and contemplate our self-reflections will help us move forward in a purposeful and expansive way.

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    Jenny Marchal

    A passionate writer who loves sharing about positive psychology.

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    Last Updated on July 2, 2020

    7 Ways To Stop Being Lazy And Start Getting Things Done

    7 Ways To Stop Being Lazy And Start Getting Things Done

    “I’m going to take a lazy day today.”

    Okay, there’s nothing wrong with this. It’s called a day off, and it’s a magical thing.

    But when every day is a “lazy day,” there’s a problem. Sometimes we just need a kick in the butt to get us up and moving, so we can handle our business effectively.

    Often, laziness has a deeper and darker cause that we don’t want to think about, let alone acknowledge. Here are 7 ways to stop being lazy and become more productive.

    1 Find Out the Root Cause

    Are you burned out from working 27 hours a day, 9 days a week since before you can remember? This is a signal that you need a rest or a change.

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    Human beings are not meant to work all the time. Our paleolithic ancestors worked, on average, about 20 hours a week. (Yeah, we members of modern society are getting hosed.) Maybe you feel overwhelmed, are afraid to fail at the task, or you just don’t want to do the task; these are discrete problems with separate solutions.

    Finding out the root cause of your laziness can help you make the changes you need to make to be a more effective and energetic person.

    2. Find Your Passion for the Work

    You started doing what you do for a reason, but sometimes, even the tasks we love the most can become dreary and mundane. When this happens, remind yourself why you started doing it in the first place.

    You must have had a passion for it at some point, or you wouldn’t be bothering with it. Remind yourself of the good points of the work, not just the parts that suck.

    3. Break up Your Time

    People work more efficiently when they have ample rest time. Working in short, focused bursts is far more effective than trying to slog through the task all at once. Not only will you be happier with the end product, but you’ll feel better and more energized after completing it.

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    Learn about The Importance of Scheduling Downtime.

    4. Look at Ways You Can Do the Task More Efficiently

    When possible, work smarter instead of harder.

    We’ve already talked about why working hard doesn’t work as well. If you can find a better way to do the task, you’re more likely to enjoy it because you’re not simply performing the task by rote, but rather, using your creativity and imagination to their best effect. This will make you feel better about the job and probably enjoy it more, too.

    Try these 12 Ways to Work Smart.

    5. Ask for Help or Support

    Sometimes, we just need a little extra backup. There’s nothing wrong with asking for help from a more motivated coworker, friend, or family member. This is a useful way to get you up and moving, because they will motivate you to do the task.

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    At the same time, you may be doing them a favor by motivating them to work harder. A little friendly competition never hurt anyone!

    Learn How to Ask for Help When You’re Afraid To Do So.

    6. Think About Why You Don’t Want to Do the Task

    This sounds like a rehash of number 1, but it’s really not.

    Some jobs we don’t want to do because they’re just not fun. Mowing the lawn, cleaning the house, or getting under the car and replacing the alternator all have one thing in common. People don’t like doing these jobs because they take time and energy, they’re not pleasant, and we know that sooner or later, we’ll just be doing the same thing all over again.

    However, instead of thinking about why you don’t want to do the task, think about the benefits. Your car will run better, the Homeowners’ Association won’t be leaving you a nasty gram for the sixth time this month, and your house will look nicer and feel more welcoming.

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    By turning a negative into a positive, you’ll find your outlook about these tasks will be more positive too.

    7. Force Yourself

    Sometimes there’s just no getting around it. All the good advice and wishes in the world won’t make the job look any better. In these cases, you need to remember you’re an intelligent, mature member of Homo Sapiens, and get off your butt.

    While it may not be fun at the time, you can look back on the task you did later and say, “Yeah. I did that.” You shouldn’t have to force yourself out of bed every morning (this is a warning sign of depression that you should NOT ignore), but every once in a while, we need to force ourselves to do something we just don’t want to do.

    Believe it or not, you’ll be proud of yourself once the task is done.

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    Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

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