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Looking to Build a Watch Collection? Wrist Society Offers a Useful Hack

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Looking to Build a Watch Collection? Wrist Society Offers a Useful Hack

It was in the precious few moments before I absolutely had to depart for an event that demanded my punctuality (my sister’s wedding; lateness would not be forgiven), that I came to a somewhat painful and perhaps even embarrassing realization: Of the two watches I owned, neither one was particularly appropriate for the formal event I was about to attend.

Enabled by my status as a “creative type,” I had conformed to a very modest, laid-back style that the overwhelming majority of serious occupations generally disapprove. So, as I stared at the options available to me—a beat-up GPS watch for distance running, and a bulky analog watch with a thick leather strap with a uniquely offensive pungency my sense of smell had somehow learned to ignore—I realized my only option was to leave with my wrist bare.

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Think Long-Term When Building a Watch Collection

In the aftermath of the wedding (which, in case you were wondering, was quite nice despite the floral arrangements not being up to the lofty standards of the mother of the bride), I began looking for a versatile watch that would be suitable for similarly formal occasions. It was during my search that I stumbled upon Wrist Society, where I learned that someone such as myself, even with my admittedly narrow fashion sense, could build a fashion-forward watch collection without breaking the bank.

After reading up on Wrist Society, I realized that my previous approach had been entirely wrong, and would have yielded similarly disastrous consequences in the future had I followed through. Although I did find quite a few watches that I felt possessed enough versatility to suit my needs, none could have possibly been versatile enough to suit the wide range of situations and circumstances for which I was trying to prepare. With a shift in focus that allowed me to think about my long-term needs, I recognized the value in building a versatile watch collection.

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Keep an Open Mind

Since, in my view at least, Wrist Society represented the path of least resistance, I signed up for a membership and have since received a new watch every month. When I first signed up, I did so with the intention of canceling the membership after three or four months, figuring I would have little interest in assembling a watch collection I would be unlikely to wear anyway.

To my surprise, however, three months passed without any action on my part. Once I reached the six-month mark and had six new watches to show for it, I made the decision to keep my membership active. Not only have I come to look forward to the excitement I experience as I discover a new watch each month, but I have also been inspired to update my closet a bit in order to properly showcase my newfound watch connoisseurship.

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Looking back, I believe the first few months of the membership forced me to be more open-minded to the full spectrum of watch styles available to me. Left to my own devices, I imagine I would have instead gravitated to similarly styled watches that felt more familiar, given my previously limited watch appreciation. To build a truly versatile watch collection, I now realize the necessity of cultivating a mindset open to any and all watch styles.

Recognize the Value of Practicality and Nostalgia

Although I held onto my digital GPS watch, as well as my chunky watch with the too-thick leather strap, it is only when I am out for a run or in the deepest grip of nostalgia that I ever wear either one, which is probably for the best. Despite its obvious lack of versatility, I still appreciate the practicality of my GPS watch, while also understanding its limits. As for the bulky analog watch, I remain confident that its thick leather strap will again become stylish sometime in the not-too-distant future, giving me a unique, well-worn, vintage timepiece certain to provoke the kind of smile that so often accompanies the pleasant feelings of nostalgia.

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Featured photo credit: Wrist Society via wristsociety.com

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Last Updated on November 22, 2021

Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

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Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

Thanksgiving, a day of pure gluttony, football, and possible uncomfortable situations with family members that you may or may not like. Oh, yeah, and the whole “know and reflect on what it is to be thankful and grateful.”

During the holiday season many people forget what this time of year is bout and are too worried about getting the “early-bird” deals on Black Friday and making sure that they have the perfect gifts for their loved ones. I am sort of a “Grinch” when it comes to the holiday season, mostly because of that mentality by many of the poeple around me.

But instead of being grinch-like this holiday season, I decided to simplify things and get back to what this time of year is actually is about; being thankful for what I have and what I can give.

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Simplify

I’m not a “minimalist” in any real sense, but in the last few months the talks of Patrick Rhone and others have got me to rethink my stance. Can you really have too much stuff?

Absolutely.

And with all that stuff comes the burden and the weight of it on your back.

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If you feel that the things around you are out of control, maybe it’s time to simplify and be thankful and grateful for what you have and use. Here are a few things that you can do to simplify:

  • You know those gadgets in the drawer that you said you were going to sell? Well, time to get the listing on eBay and sell them. Or, send them to a place like Gazelle. Even if they are old and won’t get money, you can at least recycle them.
  • Get rid of things you don’t need. Like old books, clothes, tools, etc. Have something that’s been laying around forever with no use? Donate it to a charity or church. If you aren’t using it, someone else could be.
  • Find your productivity tools and stick with them. Use tools and gadgets that serve multiple purposes so you can simplify your tool set.

Be Mindful

You don’t have to be a master Buddhist or meditator to be mindful (although, it can definitely help). Being mindful comes down to being cognizant of the present and not keeping yourself in the past or future. It’s about living in the moment and being aware of yourself and everything around you. It’s just being.

Without getting too “California” on you, it is super important to be mindful during the holiday rush. Rather than worrying about the things that you forgot at your house on the way to relatives or thinking about the next stop in your endless holiday travels, just breath and think about what you are currently doing.

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Spend the time with your family and friends and don’t crush the moment. Try not to concentrate so hard on getting the perfect photo of the “awesome moment” of the day and actually miss the awesome moment.

Being mindful over the holidays will help you be with your families, friends, and yourself allowing you to enjoy your time.

Reflect

As the year is coming to a close (yes, it really is that close!) it’s a great time to start reflecting on what you have accomplished and what you haven’t. Within the next few weeks we will have a more throrough reflection article here at Lifehack.org, but reflecting every now and then over your holiday break is a great way to see where you have been doing well in your life and where you need to improve.

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Reflection shouldn’t be used to “get down” on yourself. Reflection should be used to take an honset inventory of what you have accomplished, how you handeled situations, and what you can do better. If you journal everyday (a daily form of reflection) it may be a good time to start going over some of the things that you have written and start to put together a year’s end journal entry. I mean, how else will you write your autobiography?

But, seriously, reflecting on yourself makes you aware of your successes and faults and helps you plan and make goals for the coming year. It makes you a better person.

So, while you are stuffing your face with bird, stuffing, and mashed taters’, remember that the holidays are much more than the superficial things. Use this holiday to become a better person.

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Featured photo credit: Libby Penner via unsplash.com

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