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Looking to Build a Watch Collection? Wrist Society Offers a Useful Hack

Looking to Build a Watch Collection? Wrist Society Offers a Useful Hack

It was in the precious few moments before I absolutely had to depart for an event that demanded my punctuality (my sister’s wedding; lateness would not be forgiven), that I came to a somewhat painful and perhaps even embarrassing realization: Of the two watches I owned, neither one was particularly appropriate for the formal event I was about to attend.

Enabled by my status as a “creative type,” I had conformed to a very modest, laid-back style that the overwhelming majority of serious occupations generally disapprove. So, as I stared at the options available to me—a beat-up GPS watch for distance running, and a bulky analog watch with a thick leather strap with a uniquely offensive pungency my sense of smell had somehow learned to ignore—I realized my only option was to leave with my wrist bare.

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Think Long-Term When Building a Watch Collection

In the aftermath of the wedding (which, in case you were wondering, was quite nice despite the floral arrangements not being up to the lofty standards of the mother of the bride), I began looking for a versatile watch that would be suitable for similarly formal occasions. It was during my search that I stumbled upon Wrist Society, where I learned that someone such as myself, even with my admittedly narrow fashion sense, could build a fashion-forward watch collection without breaking the bank.

After reading up on Wrist Society, I realized that my previous approach had been entirely wrong, and would have yielded similarly disastrous consequences in the future had I followed through. Although I did find quite a few watches that I felt possessed enough versatility to suit my needs, none could have possibly been versatile enough to suit the wide range of situations and circumstances for which I was trying to prepare. With a shift in focus that allowed me to think about my long-term needs, I recognized the value in building a versatile watch collection.

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Keep an Open Mind

Since, in my view at least, Wrist Society represented the path of least resistance, I signed up for a membership and have since received a new watch every month. When I first signed up, I did so with the intention of canceling the membership after three or four months, figuring I would have little interest in assembling a watch collection I would be unlikely to wear anyway.

To my surprise, however, three months passed without any action on my part. Once I reached the six-month mark and had six new watches to show for it, I made the decision to keep my membership active. Not only have I come to look forward to the excitement I experience as I discover a new watch each month, but I have also been inspired to update my closet a bit in order to properly showcase my newfound watch connoisseurship.

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Looking back, I believe the first few months of the membership forced me to be more open-minded to the full spectrum of watch styles available to me. Left to my own devices, I imagine I would have instead gravitated to similarly styled watches that felt more familiar, given my previously limited watch appreciation. To build a truly versatile watch collection, I now realize the necessity of cultivating a mindset open to any and all watch styles.

Recognize the Value of Practicality and Nostalgia

Although I held onto my digital GPS watch, as well as my chunky watch with the too-thick leather strap, it is only when I am out for a run or in the deepest grip of nostalgia that I ever wear either one, which is probably for the best. Despite its obvious lack of versatility, I still appreciate the practicality of my GPS watch, while also understanding its limits. As for the bulky analog watch, I remain confident that its thick leather strap will again become stylish sometime in the not-too-distant future, giving me a unique, well-worn, vintage timepiece certain to provoke the kind of smile that so often accompanies the pleasant feelings of nostalgia.

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Featured photo credit: Wrist Society via wristsociety.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

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Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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