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Education is Failing Our Youth, Here’s How

Education is Failing Our Youth, Here’s How

I admit it. I am a little bit weird, even awkward at times. I am also friendly, kind, and I don’t let my shortcomings get the better of me. At least, I no longer do. Aging has afforded me at least one luxury, the ability to reflect on my life and see where things went wrong. I cannot change it, but I can learn from it and hopefully encourage others to do the same.

What does all this have to do with education? Nothing, and everything.  

I am not blaming anyone, but I have come to realize that some things did have an impact on my life. Things I often had no control over. If I had made more informed decisions and had better support, things might have turned out different for me.

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A lack of proper education is at the top of that list.

I somehow doubt that learning to knit in Mrs.Davis’s senior class was of any real use to me. This was taking place while the “boys” were learning valuable skills and trades like auto mechanics, I might add. I did not want to partake in the only work-related program being offered to the girls – secretarial studies – so I chose general sciences instead. This included subjects like Math, History, and Geography. It was the 70’s and things like feminism and socialism had not really made an impact. Honestly, I would have gotten more use out of reading the fundamentals of water damage and repair since that same year, my college dorm room flooded.

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Is our education failing our youth?  I think so. And, it has been for years.

In my opinion, Education is highly overrated. Teachers are not provided with the right materials to handle behavioral issues, and they do not have enough flexibility in the course requirements to allow for creative freedom.

Take me for example, I assumed journalism school was not the right career choice for me because I did not excel in English. My grades all throughout high school were average at best. It was not until I entered college when my professors began commenting on my writing abilities that I ever dreamed I could be a writer. How could I have missed that?

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One day it hit me.

I was not good at writing stories about topics that I had little interest in. I am the kind of person who needs to develop story ideas on my own. Writing is an art. It either flows or it doesn’t. In high school, I was required to write stories based on topics chosen by someone else. In some ways, I suppose my writing reflected my true feelings on the subject.

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The fact of the matter is, a great deal of the material provided from educators is inherently biased because it has a desired or expected outcome.

For someone as creative as I am this concept is foreign to me. I have to dissect, rearrange and debate everything before I can accept any conclusions. I cannot blame teachers, they are given a curriculum to follow. A curriculum that was likely drafted back in the early 20’s or 30’s.

It is time for the government to change the public education system to include more realistic and useful subjects for our youth. Don’t get me wrong, history and geography are important subjects. Career choices should be left up to each individual and not forced onto students who have little or no interest in them. How much knowledge do we really retain about things we have no interest in pursuing?

I think it makes a lot more sense to teach a variety of subjects and then allow students to develop on areas they want to explore before entering college. Does a geography major really need to know the philosophical nuances of a Shakespeare sonnet?

The western concept of education as we know it was developed a very long time ago.  Maybe it’s time we created a system more in line with our world today. The fact of the matter is, almost anyone can learn anything they want in a matter of minutes by doing a search on Google. Oddly, what most millennials cannot do are the ordinary everyday things like making doctor’s appointments and doing their taxes.

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Madeline Foster

Free Lance Writer

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Last Updated on January 11, 2021

11 Hidden Benefits of Using Oil Diffusers

11 Hidden Benefits of Using Oil Diffusers

Affordable, relaxing, and healthy, oil diffusers are gaining popularity with people everywhere due to their extensive benefits. Oil diffusers work through the simple process of oil diffusion, which uses heat to turn oil into a vapor that is then spread around a living space. Diffused oil can have several relaxation and health-related benefits, including safe scent-dispersion, mosquito and mold defense, stress relief, and more!

Read on for 11 hidden benefits of using oil diffusers.

1. Safe Scents That Make Sense

Unlike candles or air fresheners, oil diffusers release cleansing molecules into your air that work to purify it, not overload it with unhealthy chemicals. Electronic diffusers also do not pose the fire risk that candles do. Plus, they contain the added feature of interchangeability, which means you change oil types for different scents and health benefits.

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2. Stress Relief

Several lab studies have confirmed that diffusing essential oils like lavender have been shown to reduce stress and help relieve anxiety in medical patients. Preliminary studies have also shown that oil diffusers can help alleviate symptoms of depression.

3. Improved Sleep

Diffused oil has relaxing properties that can help people of all ages fall asleep quicker and sleep more soundly. Electronic diffusers not only have the option to mix and match different oil blends (Try a lavender, Bulgarian rose, and Roman chamomile blend to help with insomnia), they also run at a gentle hum that helps relax an agitated mind. Many also come with an auto shut-off feature to help conserve oils once you have fallen asleep.

4. Appetite Control

Much like gum, oil diffusers can help stimulate the senses in a way that works to curb appetite. New research has shown that diffused peppermint oil can help curb appetite by inducing a satiety response within the body. Diffused peppermint oil has also been shown to increase energy.

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5. Bacteria and Mold Killing

When essential oils are diffused in the air, they break down free radicals that contribute to the growth of harmful bacteria. Eucalyptus, thyme, and tea tree oils are especially good for this purpose. Diffused oil is also highly effective when it comes to combating fungal yeast threats, as the oil help makes the air inhospitable for yeasts such as mold. Pine and red thyme essential oils are best for combating mold.

6. Decongestion and Mucus Control

Ever tried Vick’s Vapo-Rub? Its decongesting powers come from active ingredients made from the eucalyptus tree. In principle, oil diffusers work the same way as Vapo-Rub, except they diffuse their decongesting vapor all around the room, not just on your chest or neck. Oil diffusers have been known to cure pneumonia in lab mice.

7. Mosquito Repellant

Nobody likes mosquitoes — but when the trade-off means using repellants full of DEET, a toxic chemical that can be especially harmful to children, mosquito control can often seem like a lose-lose. However, scientists have shown that oil diffusers can be used as a safe and highly effective mosquito repellant. Studies have shown that a diffused oil mixture containing clove essential oil and lemongrass essential oil repelled one type of Zika-carrying mosquito, the Aedes aegypti mosquito, at a rate of 100%.

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8. Pain Relief

While applying oils directly to areas of your body may be the most effective way to alleviate pain, diffusing essential oils can also be an effective means of pain relief. When we inhale healthy essential oils, they enter our blood stream and can help internally relieve persistent pain from headaches, overworked muscles, and sore joints.

9. The New Anti-Viral

Research into the anti-viral effects of oil diffusion is now just gaining steam. A recent study showed that star anise essential oil was proven in medical experiments to destroy the herpes simplex virus in contained areas at a rate of 99%. Another study showed the popular DoTerra oil blend OnGuard to have highly-effective influenza-combating powers.

10. Improved Cognitive Function

Diffusing essential oils has also been shown to improve cognitive function. Many essential oils have adaptogenic qualities, which can work twofold in soothing us when we’re stressed, and giving our bodies a pick-me-up when we’re feeling down or sluggish. By working to level out an imbalanced mood, diffused oils also help us to focus. There are also several essential oils which have been shown to help balance the body’s hormones. With prolonged use, these oils can work to repair the underlying causes responsible for hindering cognitive function.

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11. Money Saving

With ten clear benefits of oil diffusers already outlined, there is one more that should now be obvious: using an oil diffuser will help you to save money. As an anti-viral, bug repelling, and stress-relief solution rolled into one safe product, an oil diffuser used with the proper oils will save you money on products you might otherwise be buying to help cure those pesky headaches or get your kids to fall asleep on time. If you’re wondering just how affordable oil diffusers can be, check the buyer’s guide to the best oil diffusers — you’ll be sure to find one that fits your budget!

Featured photo credit: Jopeel Quimpo via unsplash.com

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