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10 Things To Consider Before Buying A Computer Chair

10 Things To Consider Before Buying A Computer Chair

The Ideal Sitting Position

Before going in depth about the things to consider before buying a computer chair and its characteristic, let me elaborate about an ideal sitting position in a computer chair.

Our thighs should be in a horizontal position to the floor, feet should be planted on the ground and arms be leveled with the desk.

Furthermore, there should be no strain in the back and you should be able to sit for a substantial amount of time without being uncomfortable.

A good chair should address all of this.

For those looking forward to buying a computer chair, here is a list of ten things to consider before buying a computer chair:

1. Adjustable Seat Height

This is the first thing to consider before buying a computer chair. You might not be the only user of your computer; other people who use the chair may differ from you in height. So, your chair must have an adjustable seat height in order to accommodate all the differing heights of the people who will be using the chair.

The height should be adjusted such that the user looks directly at the monitor. The height can vary from 16 to 21 inches approximately off the ground.

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2. Lumbar Support

Our lumbar is arched inwards naturally. Sitting too long in a chair without any support may cause slouching in the lower back and strain in the structures in the lumbar spine.

Therefore, the chair must be able to support our lumbar (and it should be adjustable too). Keep in mind if your lower back is properly supported, it will ensure that you can sit for an extended period of time without any discomfort.

3. Width and Depth of The Seat

Let me stress that the longer you sit in a chair, the more stressful the experience will be if the chair doesn’t have the proper width and depth that fits your physique. A computer chair ought to have enough width and depth to support any person comfortably.

The depth, particularly, should be enough to sit with your back against the backrest and the back of your knees must be 2 to 4 inches away from the seat of the chair.

4. Material

You wouldn’t deny that the material of the chair should be of a good quality. But, the quality of the chair that you might desire depends upon the need, purpose and length of usage of the chair.

If you use a computer for a longer period, a cloth seat may be more beneficial to you  than leather.

On the other hand, chairs made up of leather are easier to clean for messy eaters.

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That said, you should determine the fabric that best suits your needs before buying a computer chair.

5. Adjustable Backrest

A chair usually has an attached seat and backrest or a separate seat and backrest. If the seat and backrest are a single unit, your chair must have the option of tilting forward or backwards depending on what you prefer.

Additionally, it should also have a locking mechanism.

If they are separate, backrest must be adjustable in height and angle.

6. Armrest

An armrest is optional. It depends on a number of things: if you move around more often or if you sit in a chair for an extended period of time…

Essentially, your arms and shoulders should be relaxed when on the armrest.

Keep in mind that your elbows and lower arms should rest lightly on the armrest.

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It may be beneficial to have a chair with detachable armrests, so that there won’t be any hassle when performing work that requires more mobility.

7. Easy Adjustment Control

We have been talking about adjustment in each point discussed earlier; it is that important.

It is undeniable that a good chair must be customizable as per requirements, but it should also be easy to control for better comfort. The controls should be reachable from the seated position without any strain or special effort.

You should be able to change your height, tilt, and swivel from the seated position as you don’t want to keep repeating the process of standing, adjusting the chair, sitting in the chair and all over again, while using the computer.

8. Propel Wheel

Being able to move from one side of the room to another without having to stand up from the chair is a comfort we’d all like to be able to have. With wheels on your chair  you to do just that.

The wheel depends upon the types of floor you want to use the chair on.

If the computer desk is on a hard surface, buy a chair with soft, rubber wheels. If it is covered with carpet, it may be best to have hard wheels.

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It is absolutely necessary to ensure that you’ve got proper wheels on your chair to avoid any functionality problems.

9. Swivel

Your computer chair must swivel to allow you freedom to move.

For instance, let’s say that you want to turn on your printer. Would you prefer to stand up and go to where the printer is or simply rotate a little to reach it and switch it on? Obviously, you would prefer the latter.

Your chair should be able to rotate 360 degrees so you can have easier access to all your supplies in your office.

10. Price

When buying a chair, the price should be considered. At the end of the day, if you don’t agree with the price, it doesn’t matter how much functionality the chair has. So, before you go out searching for your computer chair, it is prudent to decide on a price point.

Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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