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5 Things I Learned After My Car Broke Down

5 Things I Learned After My Car Broke Down

My story starts on a country road where I was driving one gloomy Thursday afternoon. I had finished some errands in a town next to mine and was on the way back home when I heard a suspicious noise coming from under the hood of my car. Suddenly, I started slowing down and the vehicle didn’t react to me pressing the gas pedal.

Pulling over on the side of the road was the only thing to do. I was facing a car breakdown for the first time in my life. The possibility of this happening never even crossed my mind so naturally I was beyond surprised and shocked. Luckily my hometown was nearby so I called up a friend who towed me to the nearest mechanic shop.

It turned out that my engine was thrashed, and with a hefty amount of money paid, the mechanic got it running again. He warned and advised me about a few things considering my car maintenance (I admit, I was irresponsible), and told me I should take better care. This misfortune also made me think about different scenarios, for example, what if I had been on a road trip in the middle of nowhere when this happened? Or even worse, have a baby in the car?

This situation would produce a whole different set of problems and potential dangers. Ultimately this event was a learning experience, and it made more cautious and mindful when it comes to using cars. We should all be more aware of this; we don’t need to get stranded to learn to be more careful, right?

Here are some things I realized after my car broke down:

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1. Never neglect car oil changes

    This was one of my major errors, mostly due to lack of knowledge. So please learn from my mistake and change your oil regularly, according to your car manufacturer’s recommendations. Why is this important? Well, over time the oil gets dirty and runs through the engine leaving all sorts of nasty bits and sludge everywhere.

    If this keeps going on for some time, the normal functioning of the engine will be compromised by the dirt which has built up, and the oil will not be able to reach all the necessary spots. This will eventually lead to a breakdown. You also need to know which type of oil is best for your vehicle.

    Lately, many manufacturers and auto professionals have been recommending synthetic oil, because of its superior qualities compared to regular ones. It keeps the engine running smoothly and prolongs its lifespan, but you should know that it also costs a bit more. Still, purchasing the best synthetic oil will benefit you so much in the long term, that it justifies the cost.

    2. Perform regular maintenance of the car

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      Changing the oil might be the most significant thing to do for the engine, but your car is composed of many more components which also need to be looked after. For example, checking the battery, getting the tires aligned and rotated, replacing the spark plugs, etc. because, malfunctioning of a single part could prevent your vehicle from working.

      The good news here is that many of these checks you can do by yourself with just a bit of education and effort, so getting familiar with the automobile’s functions is quite useful. Unless you are a mechanic, it is also vital to take your vehicle to a general service from time to time.

      The frequency of these services is usually determined by a time period or a certain mileage (e.g. every two years or every 20,000 miles), so whichever it is, be sure to respect it.

      Since my misfortunate event occurred unexpectedly, my car was a complete mess when leaving to the mechanics’ garage. I admit it, I haven’t paid attention to car cleaning regarding maintenance, so I was pretty surprised when I saw my car got cleaned perfectly.

      Why am I telling this? Some places charge this service additionally and don’t even inform you. To prevent this, get a good car vacuum cleaner, and clean your car from time to time.

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      3. Have means of communication available at all times

        If it wasn’t for my cell phone I could have been stranded at the roadside for hours. Of course, these days it is common sense to bring your mobile everywhere you go, which is a good thing in this case, but that doesn’t leave you safe.

        An empty battery can happen to anyone so it would be smart to bring a portable battery charger or a fully charged spare phone battery which you can simply keep in the glove box of the car.

        Now, if you are venturing out into the wilderness be aware that there might not be mobile service available. In this case make sure to bring a satellite phone with you, because it can be a life saver since there will not be many strangers to ask for help in the middle of nowhere.

        4. Bring food and water everywhere you go

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          It is common to bring snacks and sandwiches if you are going on a field trip or a long drive, but I would suggest having some sort of sustenance in your car available in at all times. In the case of a breakdown who knows how long you might have to wait for help, so it’s better to be safe than sorry, hungry or thirsty.

          When it comes to drinks, the obvious choice is regular water. You can buy it in bottles, place them under the seat, and it will be there any time you need it. Another option is to get a larger container and keep it in the trunk. As far as food is concerned, going for canned products might be recommendable because they have a long shelf life and are easy to store.

          As far as food is concerned, going for canned products might be recommendable because they have a long shelf life and are easy to store.

          5. Keep a cool head

            Panic, anger and worry will never bring you any good in a situation like this. Whether you’re vehicle stops in the middle of the city or middle of the forest, the procedure you need to follow is pretty much the same. First, take a breather and accept the situation; you are where you are. Next, think of the first logical thing to do.

            Depending on your current location this step might vary, but it usually involves getting some help. Last but not least, have faith that everything is going to work out just fine. Sure some money and time might be sacrificed, but try to see the bright side, and LEARN from this experience. What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, right?

            Whether we liked it or not, mishaps occur and some things in life are just out of our control. It is your duty to be prepared for any scenario, and your chances of solving the problem faster and more easily will be increased. Try to view negative situations as a challenge and an opportunity to grow wiser, because only difficulties will give you the chance to do that. At the end of the day, at least you will have a nice story to share.

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            Dejan Kvrgic

            Blogger, Writer

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            Last Updated on July 28, 2020

            14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

            14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

            Diet trends may come and go, but a low-GI diet remains one of the few that has been shown to include benefits based on science. Low GI foods provide substantial health benefits over those with a high index, and they are key to maintaining a healthy weight.

            What is GI? Glycemic index (GI) is the rate at which the carbohydrate content of a food is broken down into glucose and absorbed from the gut into the blood. When you eat foods containing carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, which is then absorbed into your bloodstream.[1]

            The higher the GI of a food, the faster it will be broken down and cause your blood glucose (sugar) to rise. Foods with a high GI rating are digested very quickly and cause your blood sugar to spike. This is why it’s advisable to stick to low GI foods as much as possible, as the carbohydrate content of low GI foods will be digested slowly, allowing a more gradual rise in blood glucose levels.

            Foods with a GI scale rating of 70 or more are considered to be high GI. Foods with a rating of 55 or below are considered low GI foods.

            It’s important to note that the glycemic index of a food doesn’t factor in the quantity that you eat. For example, although watermelon has a high glycemic index, the water and fiber content of a standard serving of water means it won’t have a significant impact on your blood sugar.

            Like watermelon, some high GI foods (such as baked potatoes) are high in nutrients. And some low GI foods (such as corn chips) contain high amounts of trans fats.

            In most cases, however, the GI is an important means of gauging the right foods for a healthy diet.

            Eating mainly low GI foods every day helps to provide your body with a slow, continuous supply of energy. The carbohydrates in low GI foods is digested slowly, so you feel satisfied for longer. This means you’ll be less likely to suffer from fluctuating sugar levels that can lead to cravings and snacking.

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            Let’s continue with some of the best examples of low GI foods.

            1. Quinoa

            GI: 53

            Quinoa has a slightly higher GI than rice or barley, but it contains a much higher proportion of protein. If you don’t get enough protein from the rest of your diet, quinoa could help. It’s technically a seed, so it’s also high in fiber–again, more than most grains. It’s also gluten-free, which makes it excellent for those with Celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

            2. Brown Rice (Steamed)

            GI: 50

            Versatile and satisfying, brown rice is one of the best low GI foods and is a staple for many dishes around the world. It’s whole rice from which only the husk (the outermost layer) is removed, so it’s a great source of fiber. In fact, brown rice has been shown to help lower cholesterol, improve digestive function, promote fullness, and may even help prevent the formation of blood clots. Just remember to always choose brown over white!

            3. Corn on the Cob

            GI: 48

            Although it tastes sweet, corn on the cob is a good source of slow-burning energy (and one of the tastiest low GI foods). It’s also a good plant source of Vitamin B12, folic acid, and iron, all of which are required for the healthy production of red blood cells in the body. It’s healthiest when eaten without butter and salt!

            4. Bananas

            GI: 47

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            Bananas are a superfood in many ways. They’re rich in potassium and manganese and contain a good amount of vitamin C. Their low GI rating means they’re great for replenishing your fuel stores after a workout.

            They are easy to add to smoothies, cereal, or kept on your desk for a quick snack. The less ripe they are, the lower the sugar content is! As one of the best low GI foods, it’s a great addition to any daily diet.

            5. Bran Cereal

            GI: 43

            Bran is famous for being one of the highest cereal sources of fiber. It’s also rich in a huge range of nutrients: calcium, folic acid, iron, magnesium, and a host of B vitamins. Although bran may not be to everyone’s tastes, it can easily be added to other cereals to boost the fiber content and lower the overall GI rating.

            6. Natural Muesli

            GI: 40

            Muesli–when made with unsweetened rolled oats, nuts, dried fruit, and other sugar-free ingredients–is one of the healthiest ways to start the day. It’s also very easy to make at home with a variety of other low GI foods. Add yogurt and fresh fruit for a nourishing, energy-packed breakfast.

            7. Apples

            GI: 40

            Apple skin is a great source of pectin, an important prebiotic that helps to feed the good bacteria in your gut. Apples are also high in polyphenols, which function as antioxidants, and contain a good amount of vitamin C. They are best eaten raw with the skin on! Apples are one of a number of fruits[2] that have a low glycemic index. Be careful which fruits you choose, as many have a large amount of natural sugars[3].

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            8. Apricots

            GI: 30

            Apricots provide both fiber and potassium, which make them an ideal snack for both athletes and anyone trying to keep sugar cravings at bay. They’re also a source of antioxidants and a range of minerals.

            Apricots can be added to salads, cereals, or eaten as part of a healthy mix with nuts at any time of the day.

            9. Kidney Beans

            GI: 29

            Kidney beans and other legumes provide a substantial serving of plant-based protein, so they can be used in lots of vegetarian dishes if you’re looking to adopt a plant-based diet[4]. They’re also packed with fiber and a variety of minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, and other beneficial plant compounds. They are great in soups, stews, or with (whole grain) tacos.

            10. Barley

            GI: 22

            Barley is a cereal grain that can be eaten in lots of ways. It’s an excellent source of B vitamins, including niacin, thiamin, and pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), fiber, molybdenum, manganese, and selenium. It also contains beta-glucans, a type of fiber that can support gut health and has been shown to reduce appetite and food intake.

            Please note that barley does contain gluten, which makes it unsuitable for anyone who is Celiac[5] or who follows a gluten-free diet. In this case, gluten-free alternatives might include quinoa, buckwheat, or millet.

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            11. Raw Nuts

            GI: 20

            Most nuts have a low GI of between 0 and 20, with cashews slightly higher at around 22. Nuts, as one of the best low GI foods, are a crucial part of the Mediterranean diet[6] and are really the perfect snack: they’re a source of plant-based protein, high in fiber, and contain healthy fats. Add them to smoothies and salads to boost the nutritional content. Try to avoid roasted and salted nuts, as these are made with large amounts of added salt and (usually) trans fats.

            12. Carrots

            GI: 16

            Raw carrots are not only a delicious low GI vegetable, but they really do help your vision! They contain vitamin A (beta carotene) and a host of antioxidants. They’re also low-calorie and high in fiber, and they contain good amounts of vitamin K1, potassium, and antioxidants. Carrots are great for those monitoring their weight as they’ve been linked to lower cholesterol levels.

            13. Greek Yogurt

            GI: 12

            Unsweetened Greek yogurt is not only low GI, but it’s an excellent source of calcium and probiotics, as well. Probiotics help to keep your gut microbiome in balance and support your overall digestive health and immune function. Greek yogurt makes a healthy breakfast, snack, dessert, or a replacement for dip. The most common probiotic strains found in yogurt are Streptococcus thermophilus[7] (found naturally in yogurt) and Lactobacillus acidophilus[8] (which is often added by the manufacturer). You can also look into probiotic supplements for improving your gut health.

            14. Hummus

            GI: 6

            When made the traditional way from chickpeas and tahini, hummus is a fantastic, low-GI dish. It’s a staple in many Middle Eastern countries and can be eaten with almost any savory meal. Full of fiber to maintain satiety and feed your good gut bacteria, hummus is great paired with freshly-chopped vegetables, such as carrots and celery.

            Bottom Line

            If you’re looking to eat healthier or simply cut down on snacking throughout the day, eating low GI foods is a great way to get started. Choose any of the above foods for a healthy addition to your daily diet and start feeling better for longer.

            More Tips on Eating Healthy

            Featured photo credit: Alexander Mils via unsplash.com

            Reference

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