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4 Better Things To Do on Black Friday Than Shop

4 Better Things To Do on Black Friday Than Shop

This week millions of Americans will shake off their tryptophan stupor and head toward their local malls in search of Black Friday doorbuster deals. While it’s true that some stores do offer a few great prices on select items as part of the retail holiday, Black Friday is severely overrated. Furthermore, there are plenty of better ways to spend your post-Thanksgiving hours than fighting off the hordes at the big box stores.

With that in mind, here are four alternative plans to consider this Black Friday.

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Finish creating your holiday budget

Before setting foot in a department store, it’s important to have a detailed holiday budget in place. This includes a list of everyone you plan on shopping for, the target price for each item you need to pick up, and of course an overall amount you’re willing to part with in the name of gift giving. If you don’t have all of this mapped out already, Friday is a great time to get to work and help prevent yourself from overspending this year.

Make some extra cash

Often times when creating your budget, you may realize that you need a quick cash injection in order to buy for everyone you want to. Luckily there are still a few ways to earn some extra money before the big day comes around. For example, it may be worth looking through your closet for items you no longer want or need. With any luck, someone on eBay will be looking to nab just such an item for a loved one on their holiday shopping list.

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Of course, there are plenty of other ways to try and make a buck as well. If snow is in the forecast for your neck of the woods, the idea of shoveling driveways for a few dollars isn’t just for kids. But, if you’d rather stay warm, you might spend the day doing online surveys instead.

Lastly, feel free to get creative with your money-making endeavors. Who knows — you might even stumble upon a new side hustle to carry on into the new year.

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Plan for Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday

If you must shop, there are better days to do so than on Black Friday. For one, the very next day is Small Business Saturday. Although this “holiday” was indeed invented by a credit card company, it does have a stellar mission: supporting local business. This year promises to be the biggest Small Business Saturday ever, with millions of shops offering great deals, so get out there and support your entrepreneurial neighbors.

After that, there is, of course, Cyber Monday. In a way, this shopping day is similar to Black Friday, except that it doesn’t require you to put on pants. Like with Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday has also grown over the years, and now the vast majority of online retailers participate in some way. In my humble opinion, shopping online is the only way to shop during the Thanksgiving weekend, so skip Friday and wait for Monday.

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Relax

With all of the traveling, family time, and, yes, shopping that comes with the holiday season, this time of year can be extremely stressful for some folks. On that front, why exacerbate things by making a mad dash to the mall? Instead, have a nice, relaxing day in. Grab a good book, some hot cocoa, curl up by the fire, and enjoy your long weekend — you’re going to need to it.

Sure, Black Friday sales might be tempting, but they’re likely not worth the hassle. Besides, who wants to wake up early or cut their Thanksgiving dinner short just to push and shove their way through overly crowded stores?

Trust me — there are better ways to spend your day off. By putting the finishing touches on your shopping budget, racking up some last minute cash, planning for other retail holidays ahead, or just taking a relaxing day for yourself, you’ll be the real winner this Black Friday.

Featured photo credit: Wikimedia Commons via commons.wikimedia.org

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Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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