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Why asking for help isn’t the same as giving in

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Why asking for help isn’t the same as giving in

Asking for help is something most entrepreneurs (including myself) aren’t very good at doing. It’s understandable: when you come up with a killer idea for a business, you want to be the one who sets it in motion.

I started my first business aged 21 full of optimism, passion and arrogance. Like most 20 year-olds, I thought listening was a waste of time. Sure, they might have done it before, but I was doing something different and better. It took me 20 years to realise that talking to people and asking for help are two of the most useful skills an entrepreneur can learn.

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Find a mentor

Finding a mentor is a good way of receiving professional and targeted guidance. Find someone who you admire, who has more experience and a different skill set than you. Be honest about what you’re good at and where you’re struggling so that you make the most of their help. A mentor isn’t there to shower you in praise, but to offer you constructive criticism and share their experiences of the business world.

According to data presented by the Harvard Business School, 25% of start-ups crash and burn so it makes sense to take advice from someone who’s done it before and can recognise the warning signs early on. You don’t have to implement everything they say, but listen and take notes because if it’s not helpful now, it could be in the future.

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Get a partner

Sometimes it’s even more worth bringing in a partner so that the business can benefit from two or even three differing perspectives. For example, my skills tend to be more in sales and motivating, so I recently partnered with Andrew Valentine, the Founder of Street Car, who has helped massively by advising me and analysing our business models for AVirtual. It’s a really effective working relationship and means that I can spend more time doing what I love.

It’s also worth remembering that investors tend to prefer investing in a pair of founders rather than one person because they recognise that no-one is good at everything and it’s less risky for them.

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Build a network

Aside from office interactions, being an entrepreneur can be painfully lonely. It’s important to build a network of people who are doing similar things, can offer support and help you to expand your professional circles. That’s where the most exciting collaborations and partnerships come from. There will come some point in your career when you need recommendations from other professionals, whether it’s about website design, marketing or assembling a board of directors so it’s worth making as many connections as you can now.

Also, don’t underestimate the usefulness of professional organisations; they can connect you with CEOs from across the globe and usually, have amazing archives of motivational and focussed articles on relevant business topics. I’ve met some of the most interesting people in my career through EO, but there are networks in almost every community which you can join. It can be daunting, but pushing through your comfort zone usually pays off.

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Hire an assistant

Finally, hire an assistant early on so that you don’t become one. It might seem like a luxury, particularly when you’re just starting out, but employing someone to take care of day-to-day administration will save you a massive amount of time and make the whole experience more enjoyable.

It’s hard when you’re an entrepreneur because your role isn’t always that clear cut and you end up doing a bit of everything, which can be quite challenging and unsettling, not to mention stressful. An assistant can help you learn to prioritise and delegate; skills, which are vital for effective leadership and optimal productivity.

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Featured photo credit: Atlas Green via unsplash.com

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Richard Walton

Founder of AVirtual

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