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Four Approaches the Most Successful Leaders use to Connect with Coworkers

Four Approaches the Most Successful Leaders use to Connect with Coworkers

The whole point of being an effective leader in the workplace is to connect with the members of your team in such a way that motivates them to give you their all. Get this right and your coworkers will provide you with an endless stream of massive productivity and success. Get it wrong and your days as the leader around the office may be numbered.

To make sure you connect with people in your workplace in the most effective way, you are going to have to develop a few strategies that help people accept you as their leader and give you the respect and cooperation that you deserve. With that in mind, here are a few strategies that can take you from being on the outside to being tightly connected with every coworker on your team.

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Give Genuine Praise.

If you want to get the attention of your team members and get them on your side, giving them genuine compliments will do the trick. No one likes to go through life not being noticed for the tremendous effort they put into their work. Leaders who refuse to give genuine praise for good work send the message that their coworkers are not able to please them no matter how much effort they put forth. Leaders who take the time to notice an honest effort and hand out praise when it is deserved without coming off “plastic” in the process, already have the respect and loyalty of their coworkers. A hand-written note is still one of the best ways to send praise to a coworker when you want them to know you were truly impressed with something they did.

Everyone has Their Price.

While most leaders try hard to motivate their coworkers to let them in, they often ignore a simple rule that works every time. That rule is that you have to give in order to get. If you want to get your coworkers to connect with you, you must be willing to give something to motivate this.

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This may sound like a bribe and it should not be mistaken for anything less. Bribing your coworkers is a very effective way to not only build a tight connection, but to make them depend on that connection as well. You just have to ask probing questions to learn the things you can do for them to motivate them to want to connect with you.

Give them the right incentives and the connection will be rock solid. Knowing these motivating triggers can also help push a lagging member of your team into high gear performance mode. Never underestimate the sheer raw power of a good bribe to get what you want out of your team members.

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A Leader Can be Fun, Too.

People are highly attracted and motivated by fun experiences. When people are having loads of fun the vibe is truly contagious. A leader should be able to make their coworkers feel like connecting with them is fun to do as much as possible.

If you are a stick in the mud around your coworkers, they will not feel invited or comfortable around you. If you are loads of fun, yet able to maintain a professional air while making them laugh and enjoy themselves at work, they will see you as the leader that deserves their attention- not the leader from whom they recoil.

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Get Down to Business.

When it comes to advancing your skills as a leader who properly connects with your team, obtaining senior leadership training and experience is a key method of improving how you reach out to your coworkers and make a meaningful connection. Often this level of training can be facilitated at a leadership team development retreat, where you and your team have an opportunity to not only bond, but also learn to function more cohesively by learning new skill sets like conflict resolution, effective problem solving, and business planning strategies. These skills will help improve the overall performance and productivity of your team around the office.

Connecting with the coworkers on their team is something that every leader will have to do at some point in their career. While some members of the team will be easier to connect with than others, it is important to realize that a broad spectrum of approaches works to connect with a wide variety of people. Just because one approach fails to get your coworkers to open up and give you their best, that does not mean another approach will be met with failure. Since good leaders conquer where others fail, you must be willing to try a lot of things to make that connection happen and get your team operating like a well-oiled machine.

Featured photo credit: 123RF.com via 123rf.com

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Last Updated on November 3, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

When you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you may create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion. However, this type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It lacks in clarity and makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing. Instead, try looking at some mind map examples to learn how to mind map and visualize your thoughts.

Mind maps can help you zoom out and see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected. You may see connections you were missing before and find new ways of brainstorming solutions.

Below, you’ll find more information on mind maps and see some mind map examples to inspire you next time you need to organize information.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram invented by Tony Buzan[1]. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to declutter your brain or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using a pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

How to mind map: Mind map example

    Image Credit: English Central

    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

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    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[2]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner. It can be a single word or even a central image.

    How to mind map: start with a central idea

      Step 2 : Add Branches of Related Ideas

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out nearby by connecting it with shorter lines or a line of a different color. Ensure that it remains organized.

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          You can always add images or other branches later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits.” Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

          Mind map example

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, and add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

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              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                One your ideas have filled the branches, the mind map is complete.

                Branch by branch mind map example

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy of mind map examples, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. Here, you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Do the same for the next level (level 3). You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                      Level by level mind map example

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. There are no rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                        Free flow mind map example

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you to help you start problem solving.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map using the mind map examples above. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and organize your thoughts.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective, and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on a phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

                          [1] Tony Buzan Group: Home
                          [2] Verbal to Visual: A Mind Mapping Approach To Your Sketchnotes

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