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5 Best Ways For Busy People ‘On-The-Go’ to Learn a Language

5 Best Ways For Busy People ‘On-The-Go’ to Learn a Language

Feel like you’re “too busy’ to learn a language? Think again.

All of us have the same 24 hours in the day, but how is it that some of us get 2-5x more done than others?

For most people, it means sacrificing quality of life, sleep, and relationships to get everything done. For others, it’s taking advantage of productivity hacks to help them get more done in less time.

“Don’t say you don’t have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michaelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein.”― H. Jackson Brown Jr.

This is what prevents most of us from learning a new skill. We’re led to believe that we have to sacrifice something important to us in order to gain something of value, like learning a new language. But that’s usually not the case.

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For people ‘on-the-go’ reading this, we’ve compiled a list of language learning websites specifically built for busy people like you. Before we share the list, we should first define what it means for a resource to be considered ‘on-the-go’ (if you want to skip this section, just scroll down to the lists.

a. Online learning experience (Anywhere you want)

b. 30 minutes or less per session (Everyone has 30 minutes to spare!)

c. Ability to learn when you’re free (Anytime you want)

Now that we’ve defined what we mean by on-the-go, let’s get on to the list! We hope you enjoy and share it out with a friend or two!

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1. Mobile apps

Recommended: Duolingo
Time required: 15-20 minutes/day

Mobile language apps are one of the easiest (and most popular) ways to develop your language skills on-the-go. You can learn new vocabulary and grammar at a time of your convenience, or when you’re waiting in line, etc. There are several limits to this approach, as you can’t learn how to speak your target language with tools like Duolingo, but it’s a great starter for beginners.

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    2. Conversation exchanges

    Recommended: Interpals

    Conversation exchanges is an easy way to meet like-minded people that are also learning a new language. Sometimes it can just be someone who’s learning the same language as you, and finding an accountability partner. Other times, you could find someone who’s fluent in your target language that can help you out.

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      3. Language tutoring websites

      Recommended: Rype

      Language tutoring websites like Rype allow you to connect with handpicked professional language teachers to receive live 1-on-1 lessons. It’s like having your own private in-person tutor, but having the ability to learn at comforts of your own home, when you’re available, and the opportunity to meet with multiple native speakers around the world. Learn more here.

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        4. Podcasts

        Recommended: LanguagePod101

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        Podcasts are the rage today. For a good reason too. It allows you to listen to it when you’re waiting in traffic, on the train, or just walking to meet your friends. More specifically, language podcasts are perfect for anyone who’s living on-the-go. While languagepod101 is a premium service, you can also find many free podcasts that focus on specific languages for you to learn from. Check out the complete listing of free language podcasts.

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          5. Free Newsletters

          Recommended: Learn a Language Challenge (1,000 words in 100 days)

          If you’d rather have your education delivered to your inbox, this may be the route you pursue. There are multiple newsletters online that you can look into, which offers various challenges, vocabulary and grammar training, words of the day, etc. In less than 5 minutes a day, you can have your own mini-language lessons on your smartphone or at the office.

          learn-a-language

            We’d love to hear from you. Which of these on-the-go resources will you take advantage of? Please share this with one friend and encourage them to learn a language with you!

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            Last Updated on January 18, 2019

            7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

            7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

            Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

            But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

            If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

            1. Limit the time you spend with them.

            First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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            In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

            Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

            2. Speak up for yourself.

            Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

            3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

            This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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            But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

            4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

            Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

            This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

            Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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            5. Change the subject.

            When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

            Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

            6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

            Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

            I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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            You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

            Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

            7. Leave them behind.

            Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

            If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

            That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

            You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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