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6 Project Management Apps No Contractor Can Do Without

6 Project Management Apps No Contractor Can Do Without

Project managers have high burnout rates because they have to cope with so many responsibilities. They must take advantage of different apps to streamline tasks and manage workflow effectively.

Rachel Burger of Capterra reached out to several project managers in the contracting industry. They told her they are pursuing more creative solutions for project management. This includes adapting new technology, such as smartphone and desktop apps.

“The construction critical path method (CPM) is a tool that many project managers use, often with their construction management software, to help figure out the best steps to take to finish a job efficiently. This critical path method, otherwise known as critical path scheduling, is one of the most frequently used construction planning techniques. Critical chain, on the other hand, looks specifically at the longest chain considering task and resource dependencies.”

Here are the best apps project managers will need in 2016. They can help you stay in budget and improve quality assurance.

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1. Asana

Project managers often need to oversee multiple teams with different responsibilities. Asana is a great platform for this. At least 140,000 companies use Asana for project management.

You can create multiple virtual workstations and assign work to members of each team. For example, contractors can have separate workstations for their HVAC, electrical and glass installation teams.

You can provide up to 15 users for free. If you want to manage a team with 15 to 29 users, you will need to upgrade and pay $50 a month.

2. WorkflowMax

WorkflowMax is a specialized project management app for contractors. They allow general contractors and subcontractors to coordinate with each other. It can be accessed from job sites and has a seamless billing tool, which is something most other project management tools lack.

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The interface is customized around the terminology used by most contractors, so it’s highly intuitive.

3. MeisterTask

MeisterTask is one of the newest project management tools. It has a unique GUI interface that allows project managers to coordinate tasks through dragging and dropping lists. You can also generate project frameworks with mind maps, rather than building them from scratch. It’s ideal for contractors that are still in the early stages of planning after getting blueprints from an architect.

Since it’s highly automated, MeisterTask is much more efficient than many of its predecessors. You can add an unlimited number of projects and users with the freemium version of MeisterTask. However, the functionality is limited. If you want unlimited integrations, you will need to pay $9 a month.

4. Clarizen

Clarizen is ideal for managing complex projects where the stakes are high. It has a number of resource management and Financial management tools, which helps project managers complete projects within budget. Clarizen also has a number of document management and social sharing tools, which is ideal for complicated projects that require numerous documents.

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All versions of Clarizen require a paid subscription, which begins at $30 a month. However, it’s definitely worth paying for the service if you want a highly versatile project management interface.

5. Dapulse

First project management solutions rely on a binary task management system. After a task is completed, you simply click the checkbox. Unfortunately, this approach isn’t always very practical, because most tasks are multistage processes.

Dapulse provides a more granular and useful approach. You can keep track of various stages in a task. It’s easier to provide progress updates to your clients and superiors.

6. Basecamp

Tools like Dapulse and Asana are great for compartmentalizing work for multiple teams. However, sometimes it’s better to use a more centralized project management interface.

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Basecamp allows you to keep all of your projects in a single, central location, where all team members can give input. If you have a team that requires a lot of coordination between members of various departments, Basecamp is a great solution.

Basecamp subscriptions start at $10 a month. However, they provide a 60-day free trial, which is great if you want to test the interface before making the commitment.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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