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7 Proven Rules to Learn Any Language In Record Time

7 Proven Rules to Learn Any Language In Record Time

Learning a language is like learning any other skill.

There’s a steep learning curve in the beginning, rough moments throughout the journey, and most importantly, proven rules that you can follow.

Whether you want to learn how to code, how to speak a foreign language, or become a better public speaker, there are others who have already done it. By learning from their biggest mistakes and lessons, you can reach your end goal significantly faster than you would trying to learn everything yourself.

Today, we’ll share the 7 proven rules to learn any language in record time.

1. Start With the End Goal in Mind

If you don’t know where you want to end up, you’re not going to know where to go. Especially when things get tough.

This is why innovative entrepreneurs, inventors, and influencers require a massive vision that they can rely on during the worst times.

Make sure you have a meaningful purpose of why you want to learn a language. Is it to develop a deeper connection with your family, life partner, friends? Or maybe it’s because you want to advance your career by opening up new opportunities that would normally not be available today.

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Another important skill to learn is how to set goals that clarify your end goal. Here’s an example:

Bad goal: I want to learn a language so I can travel to Europe by next year.

Good goal: I want to learn how to speak Spanish so I can travel to Buenos Aires, Argentina by next summer.

Great goal: I will have a 15-minute conversation in Spanish with a native Argentinian person over coffee in a cafe in Buenos Aires on July 2017.

Notice how specific, visual, and deadline oriented the great goal is compared to the bad goal.

2. Pick the Right Language

In his blog post, Tim Ferriss mentioned that language learning is similar to picking up a sport. Most of us have already learned how to play a sport from our childhood days, just like how we know how to speak at least one language.

Picking the right language is not about the dream language you want to learn (although there is nothing wrong with that). In this case, we’re specifically talking about learning speed.

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Let’s say you were a professional tennis player. Chances are that learning how to play golf would be a much more transferable and easier skill to learn than learning how to play football.

The same thing applies for languages. If you already know how to speak English, learning Spanish, French, Portuguese, or any language from the latin family would be easier than trying to learn Mandarin.

By being aware of the language you already know, you can choose transferrable languages to help you accelerate your learning.

3. Follow a Proven Strategy

There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when you’re learning something new. For nearly any skill, there’s someone who has already achieved expert status.

“If you want to be successful, find someone who has achieved the results you want and copy what they do and you’ll achieve the same results.” -Tony Robbins

When it comes to languages, there is an abundance of resources you can find from the comforts of your home, including:

  • Language Blogs
  • Language Podcasts
  • Language Youtubers
  • Language Teachers

You can follow the strategies and tactics from any of these influencers who will help you shorten your learning curve.

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4. Allocate Time Everyday to Learn (15-30 minutes)

Nothing can be learned without the time commitment. Most of us have dozens of things that we are juggling throughout the day, from our work, social life, health, etc.

But all of us have 15 to 30 minutes to learn something if we make it a priority in our lives.

We’ve previously written how you can create more time to learn something new, but we’ll summarize it here for you:

  • Track your schedule: Start by tracking everything you’re doing during the day on your calendar. Even include leisure activities like hanging out with friends, eating, and watching Netflix. You’ll be surprised how much free time you have to spend on learning something new.

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    • Prioritization: Now that you have a better idea of how you’re spending the day. It’s about prioritizing what’s truly important to you. Start by ranking which of these you should be focusing on, and even start delegating/eliminating the ones you don’t need.
    • Optimization: Last is optimizing. There are three ways to optimize your schedule:
    1. Shorten your work tasks
    2. Cut out your least important free time
    3. Bundle your free times together

    5. Take Advantage of Complimentary Tools and Resources

    When it comes to language learning, there are hundreds of free to cheap tools and resources that you can use. These include:

    • Mobile apps
    • Books
    • Vocabulary tools
    • Language exchanges
    • & much more

    If you want to know all the resources available to you as a language learner, check out this complete guide to free language learning tools.

    6. Have Someone Teach You and Keep You Accountable

    If your goal is to learn faster, you’re going to need help.

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    This could be a personal friend, colleague, or a professional teacher that can keep you motivated and accountable throughout your journey.

    “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.”

    There are plenty of conversation exchanges you can check out to find a fellow language learning partner, or language tutoring platforms where you can connect with professional language teachers from the comforts of your home.

    While you may feel that going alone may be the best option when starting out, it’s rarely the sustainable option in the long-run. As every language learner will tell you, learning a language is a marathon, not a sprint.

    7. Just Keep Going

    Nearly every struggle or problem you have is temporary. With a little bit of sweat and persistence, you can overcome just about anything (without trying to preach the choir).

    Whenever you feel like quitting or giving up, remember that thousands of others have come before you, and have felt the exact same way. But the reason why they’ve gotten to the other side is because they overcame the pain, doubt, and fear despite what their brain was telling them. You can do the same.

    If you enjoyed this article, please share this with one person that can benefit from reading this!

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    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    No!

    It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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    But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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    What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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    But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

    1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
    2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
    3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
    4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
    5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
    6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
    7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
    8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
    9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
    10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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