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3 Best Exercises for Glute Hypertrophy

3 Best Exercises for Glute Hypertrophy

Most people seem to think that squats are all you need to build big, strong glutes. While squats are great for glute hypertrophy, they mostly work the bottom-end of the hip hinge range of motion. During a squat, your glutes work hardest down in the hole, AKA the bottom of the squat. That means your glutes are firing most when they are being stretched.

You also need to incorporate movements where your glutes are working maximally in a contracted position. In doing so, you hit the glutes from all angles, strengthening it at all points of the hip hinge range of motion (your hip hinge is the hinge between your torso and legs).

Your glutes are stretched when you bend at the hip, folding your torso closer to your thighs. They are contracted in hyperextension when you squeeze your glutes and thrust your hips forward.

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To better understand and visualize this, simply think of your glutes as a rubber band connecting your lower back to the tops of your hamstrings. If you bend at the hip, the rubber band stretches. If you thrust your hips forward, the insertion points of the rubber band get closer together and tighten up, as muscles do when they contract.

The following 3 exercises work your glutes at the bottom, middle, and end-ranges of motion of your hip hinge. What’s special about these exercises is that you can go really heavy with them and get really strong. Mass moves mass. If you’re barbell thrusting 225 pounds, I guarantee your glutes will grow to ample proportion.

1. Barbell Hip Thrusts

This is one of the greatest glute-growing, booty-pumping exercises out there. If you want to build big, strong, shapely glutes, you better incorporate barbell hip thrusts.

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Simply load up a barbell, lie flat on the ground, and slide the barbell over your feet and knees until it rests directly above your hips — this is your starting position. Hold the barbell in place on your hips and press through your heels until your butt comes off the ground. Push the bar as high as you can until your hips are fully locked out. Return to the starting position. That’s one rep.

One set of 8 reps with heavy weight will have your glutes burning like no other. Sure you could accomplish a similar burn doing 20 glute kickbacks, but heavy weights are more fun and will really pack the mass on that behind.

2. Deadlifts

“But my bestest friend ever said deadlifts will break my back.”

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That’s true… if you do them wrong. Deadlifts are one of the best exercises for glute development because of the large load you can apply and because they are a hip-hinge dominant movement. They work your glutes most during the middle to end-ranges of the hip hinge.

Sumo deadlifts and conventional deadlifts are both extremely demanding on the glutes. The hip extension needs for each movement are nearly identical. Some will tell you otherwise, but a study was run using an EMG to compare the electrical activity in the glutes and hamstrings between the two styles. The readings for sumo and conventional deadlifts came out the same. So, for glute hypertrophy purposes, both types of deadlifts will produce similar results. My advice is to find the stance you are most comfortable in and can perform the exercise most smoothly.

That said, consult a knowledgeable and experienced lifter or personal trainer to coach you through the form queues required for a proper deadlift. I don’t want anyone breaking backs out there — only pant seams.

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3. Squats

Of course, if we’re talking about building a booty, squats have to enter the conversation.

Like I said before, squats work the bottom-range of the hip hinge. In order to fully utilize this stretch on your glutes, make sure you are squatting deep. Quarter-squatters are going to have trouble developing their glutes with squats. In fact, quarter-squatters aren’t even squatting. The crease of your hips must pass below your knees in order to perform a proper squat.

The deeper you go in your squats, the more you stretch your glutes. The more you stretch your glutes, the bigger your booty will get.

While you’ll definitely see decent results from using any of the 3 exercises above alone, implementing all 3 will give you phenomenal results. What’s most important is that these exercises allow you to work up to heavy resistance. Heavier weights stimulate your muscles more, and more muscle stimulation equals more growth.

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Drew Kocak

Online Personal Trainer / Fitness Blogger

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Last Updated on February 24, 2021

How to Find Workout Motivation When You Hate Exercise

How to Find Workout Motivation When You Hate Exercise

It’s easy to fall into a mindset where you hate exercise. It does, indeed, demand a lot from you. You have to use special clothes, develop a routine and exercise habit, get out of the comfort of your own home, and wear yourself out to the point where you just want to collapse into bed. Fortunately, while there are a lot of reasons to dislike exercise, there are even more reasons to love it.

If you want to stop hating exercises and making excuses to avoid it, here’s how to tackle each one of those exercise excuses, get into action, and give your body the attention it craves.

1. You Don’t Have to Exercise 30 Minutes Each Day to Get Results

Most of us have a number that we think we should hit in order to exercise “enough.” For some people, this is the daily recommended minimum of 30 minutes. For others, it’s 45 minutes of weight-training plus another 45 minutes of cardio.

I’m not going to put up a fight with your number here. What I am going to do is challenge your idea of starting with that number right away. You see, even though 30 minutes a day might not seem like a lot, 30 minutes a day for the next 5 years is actually too much for your habitual brain to process.

So yes, everyone can do 30 minutes of daily exercise for one week. But how many people can do that for the next 5 years?

Starting small has the advantage of bypassing your brain’s fight-or-flight response, the mechanism that make you sabotage yourself when you are trying to do something that seems “big” for too long and makes you hate exercise.

This way, instead of mindlessly starting with an exercise program, you focus on building the habit first, and then once you are exercising a little bit every day, you are ready to expand how much exercise you do.

2. You Don’t Have to Force Yourrself to Do It

If you have to force yourself to do it, then there is a 90% chance that you are doing it wrong, and you will never stick to exercise.

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Some people are motivated by challenges and others pushing them, while others hate it.

If you are one of the people who hate it, stop trying to change yourself, and of course, stop treating yourself as if you were one of those people who are motivated by challenges and being pushed. The more you use this approach on yourself, the more you’ll hate exercise and avoid it in the long term.

Instead, change the way you approach exercise. Stop falling into what I call the “Happiness Paradox Trap.” Instead of starting with what you think you “should do,” start with what feels good.

Maybe weight lifting and running aren’t your thing, but have you tried Zumba or Pilates classes? Maybe you hate the feel of a gym, so try getting into cycling instead. Don’t feel that there’s one right way to go about it, and do your best to make it your own.

3. You Can Regain Motivation Easily

We think that motivation is the answer to sticking to exercise. If only we wanted it enough, then we would make it happen.

However, motivation is always there. If you feel you wish you exercised more, then you are motivated to exercise. If you are not doing it, it’s not because you are not motivated. It’s because something stops you.

It might be the activated fight-or-flight response we talked about in #1. For example, when you feel that you have too much to do, the fight-or-flight response kicks in, and you do nothing.

People who have already made exercise a daily ritual don’t depend on boosting their motivation to get off the couch and exercise. They just do it, naturally, without debating it with themselves, desperately trying to get themselves into action.

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Maybe you think you need to devote 1 hour and you don’t know how to do that. Or, maybe you think you need to suffer to get results. Whatever the real reason is, find it. Only then will you be able to figure out a way to remove the obstacle that is on your way.

4. You Do Need Exercise to Lose Weight

Many people only care about their weight. Yet, our bodies are naturally wired to feel good when we move. Here is a quick list of the benefits of exercise:

  • Decreases the risk of various diseases and bad health conditions, like high cholesterol, diabetes, stroke, certain types of cancer, arthritis, and cardiovascular diseases.
  • Increases longevity. Many research studies support the fact that exercise can reverse some signs of aging and reduce chances of death by any cause.[1]
  • Improves mood. Exercise does not just help depressed people; it helps everyone, even those who hate exercise. A quick workout or walk stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier and more relaxed.
  • Increases your energy levels. Regular physical activity boosts your endurance and helps your heart and lungs work more efficiently. And yes, that means more energy available for you.
  • Improves sleep. Regular physical activity can help you sleep better and fall asleep more easily, as long as you don’t exercise a couple of hours prior to bedtime.
  • Improves sex life. Erectile dysfunction? Lack of libido? Just lack of energy? Exercise may help with all of that.
  • Helps you better control your weight. Exercise helps you burn calories, plus you build muscle that generally burns more calories than fat. Exercise is a great add-on to a diet or weight maintenance plan.
  • Gets you better lab results, even if you are overweight. Did you know that an obese person who is fit, i.e., exercises regularly, will show better lab results than a thin person who never exercises?

5. Exercise Doesn’t Require All of Your Attention

Maybe you are currently busy with your work life, or you are planning a trip next week. Maybe your child just got sick and needs your constant attention. Shouldn’t you just wait until you can give exercise 100% of your attention?

This rationale once again sounds plausible, but just like the “I don’t have time” excuse, is it really true? Is not starting because you are not “ready” the best thing for you right now? Is neglecting yourself and your body for a few more weeks/months/years a good strategy?

Finally, how many months or years will you spend before you get all your ducks in a row?

6. Exercise Can Be Interesting

Most advice in response to this excuse tells you to find something that you actually like. Yet, I know that for most people, exercise itself is rarely the thing that makes you hate exercise. Having to do it for “too long” is the issue.

That’s why I said that if 30 minutes are boring, try 5 or 10.

Now, if this idea of starting small stresses you out, let me remind you the wisdom of #1–the fact that you may want to be exercising one hour a day doesn’t mean you have to start from one hour right away. You can start small, and as you feel more and more comfortable, build your way up.

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Getting into a fitness program or hiring a personal trainer for a couple of weeks can also help you find a routine that interests you.

7. You Can Rewrite the Negative Past Experiences

I understand that you came last at the sprint race when you were at school. I understand that you may feel embarrassed when you attend fitness classes. Luckily, your past does not need to define your future.

A client of mine wanted to start jogging. She started by walking around the neighborhood. Yet, she found out she felt really uncomfortable feeling that her neighbors were watching her.

She accepted that, and worked her way around it. Instead of walking around her own block, she walked around the block next to her own block, and the problem was solve. A few months later, she was already jogging 2 miles a couple of times a week.

8. Exercise Doesn’t Need To Be a Hassle

If you think you need to exercise for an hour, take a shower, and drive to the gym and back, then you have two hours gone, just like that. You might like moving your body, but you certainly don’t like having to spend all this time working out!

Luckily, exercise that gets you results doesn’t have to take all this time and scheduling brainpower.

To start, you could do something that takes less time and planning, like exercising at home. You may feel more comfortable if you get to work out within sight of your comfy sofa instead of driving 20 minutes to the nearest gym.

You can also try automating. For example, if you go to the gym after work, make sure your gym bag is ready from the day before, so you don’t have to deal with that during your busy morning.

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9. You Do Have Enough Time to Exercise

Even though we know people busier than us who actually exercise, we keep saying we are “too busy,” and we hate exercise for making us even busier.

Have you ever thought that being “busy” is actually a lie? If there are busier people than you who make it happen, then so could you. Yet, even though we acknowledge that, we still believe it’s true.

It’s time to admit that time is not the main issue. It’s probably the way your are prioritizing things, and you are afraid you’ll have to give up something else in favor of exercise. Whatever the real reason, you need to find it if you want to give your body a chance to thrive.

If you don’t know where to start when finding time to exercise, check out Lifehack’s free 4 Step Guide to Creating More Time Out of a Busy Schedule.

10. Exercise Will Not Take Time Away From Other Things

You might be worried that exercise will take too much of your time, or that you’ll need to give up another hobby or time with your family to do it.

If you don’t want to hate exercise, you must first stop making it the enemy. If it is the thing that will “stop you” from doing other things, you’ll likely never convince yourself that it’s worth it.

However, if exercise becomes the thing that will help you become healthier, be more active for your kids, and focus more at work, it then becomes a necessity that you’re willing to make room for in your life.

The Bottom Line

It can often feel natural to hate exercise. Life is already demanding a lot from us, and exercise is just one more thing we have to squeeze in. However, once you realize all of the benefits you can receive from it, it will feel less like a chore and more like the part of your day you look most forward to.

More on Getting Into the Exercise Habit

Featured photo credit: Minna Hamalainen via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Maturitas: Exercise and longevity

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