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7 Things You Need To Know Before Creating An Employee Handbook

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7 Things You Need To Know Before Creating An Employee Handbook

Starting your own business is a difficult venture. You have to take care of a plethora of things and even then success is never guaranteed. Only after you go through several trials and tribulations, and learn from your experiences will you finally be able to carve your name in the world of entrepreneurship. In this world, the one who perseveres is the one who survives.

Employees are the part and parcel of any company. Having employees on board is one thing; making them follow your lead is entirely another. The success of a company is engrained in the ability of the employers to manage their employees. Discipline, work ethic, professionalism and dedication are vital components of a well-run organization. All these requirements are encapsulated in an employee handbook that is generally unique to a company. An employee handbook guides all employees on how to behave and conduct themselves in the realm of an office space. Basically, it is a summary of the organization’s policies and regulations.

The following are some of the things you should know before you write an employee handbook. Mind you, these are just guidelines to help you with the writing process. Writing the perfect employee handbook is an art in itself. You cannot simply conjure an all-encompassing, well-written handbook out of thin air. In fact, it takes years of experience, effort and constantly updating yourself with the times to write the perfect one. As always, practice makes perfect.

1. Why do you need an employee handbook?

All companies have policies––formal or informal––that dictate the terms of employment and expectations from its employees. Having clearly defined policies in one document creates an easily accessible record for the company hierarchy.

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For new employees, you may use this handbook to easily introduce them to the company’s rules and regulations. With an employee handbook, you don’t need to run around telling everyone how to behave in the office.

2. A handbook can protect you in court.

Running a company is not easy work. There are a thousand things that can go wrong, and sooner or later, you might even have to be in a court battling a disgruntled ex-employee. Say, he files a case believing he didn’t deserve to get sacked –– you might have to take the blame for someone else’s wrongdoing.

The same laws may not be universally applicable, or there may be distinct laws based on the nature of your business. Having a hard copy of your company’s rules and regulations is. therefore, vital as everything you want to address will be established in writing. Further, if you do not have the policies deemed necessary by legislation, you could be prosecuted and fined.

3. “Must have” handbook provisions

There are many indispensable provisions that must be included in your handbook. Some of these are related to the well-being of the employees. Violence and harassment in the workplace are inexcusable and must be forbidden.

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A company must include an occupational health and safety policy. Human rights is another issue that has been in the spotlight for several years now. The latter two policies are absolutely necessary, especially in the construction industry.

4. “Good to have” and other handbook provisions

Your employee handbook can cover an extensive scope of policies that sometimes may include some unorthodox policies as well. They may be out-of-the-box, but addressing these policies may sometimes be crucial for the functioning of your company.

Say that two employees fall in love at work and start exhibiting public displays of affection much to the chagrin or amusement of other employees. This may affect the overall performance of the company and having a policy on such issues can firmly draw the line between work and personal life.

Privacy, computer and internet policy, work attendance, overtime, pregnancy, etc. are some other policies which may be instrumental to the company’s operation.

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5. Remember, it’s only a guide

Sometimes, an employee handbook may be misinterpreted as a contract statement. But unless you want it to be treated so, it is better to explicitly state at the outset that the handbook is not intended to be used as a contract document.

This is critical, like in the case of employment-at-will, which means that the boss can fire an employee at his will for any reason (except discrimination or other exceptions). Every now and then, you might want to exercise that power to let people off whenever you want.

But, if your handbook specifically lists reasons for termination, without proper disclaimers, these may be considered as the ONLY legal base for termination, if the handbook is considered a contract.

6. Communicating your employee handbook

As mentioned above, a handbook can help defend your company in a court case. But if an employee can somehow prove that they never saw or read a copy, the court can’t help you at all.

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So, make sure that all your employees have read and agreed to the terms written down in the handbook. Ask them to sign a statement saying that they have done so and also notify them in case of any updates or new additions. A meeting to review policy changes will also serve well.

Make your handbook pleasing to the eye and easy to understand, avoiding jargon wherever possible. Title it unconventionally if you want; this is your company’s handbook, not a lesson in literature. Use one that will engage your employees and articulate your company’s culture right away.

7. Consult an employment attorney

As your company grows, and your handbook incorporates a wide range of policies, it may become tedious to update these policies regularly. Not to mention, when your company opens a branch in a new part of the country, it may require new policies in accordance with the jurisdiction there.

These laws may sometimes be overlooked, which can have serious implications for the company. Having an attorney comes in handy in these situations. And these employee handbooks should be reviewed at least once every two years.

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The times change fast, and updating these policies regularly may be the key to your company becoming the next big thing or languishing in bankruptcy.

Featured photo credit: Wikipedia via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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