Advertising
Advertising

How An Entrepreneur Makes Money When They Don’t Have Any

How An Entrepreneur Makes Money When They Don’t Have Any

I understand what it’s like, I’ve been there myself, you have all of these big ideas that you know would work, make millions, go viral and so on, but you simply don’t have the cash to push them through. It’s frustrating, finding investment is hard, and you feel as though you’re in a vicious circle that you’ll never get out of.

But there’s hope! To make money when you don’t have any, you have to do two things.

1. Scale Down

Number one is scaling down. When you don’t have enough money, you need to have a certain mindset that can take you from location A to location B.

This mindset is made up of acceptance and compromise. Accepting the fact that you can’t go out and spend thousands on advertising, then compromising to find a scaled down version of what you originally wanted to do.

Advertising

This is where most people struggle because they aren’t willing to put out what they would call a…bad product/service. But for anyone who’s read the book The Lean Startup by Eric Ries, you’ll know where I’m coming from. For those of you who haven’t, I recommend reading it.

The Lean Startup talks about your MVP – Minimum Viable Product. This is a version of the product or service that requires the least amount of time and money spent but still does the job in a minimalist way. What’s the point in spending thousands on a new idea if you haven’t tested it yet, or worse, spending thousands of hours and wasting time you can never get back?

This is why sometimes, the one with the least money comes out on top. Having too much cash can be a burden, it makes you reckless and somewhat lazy. You begin to believe that flooding money into your idea will automatically make it work, but it doesn’t quite work this way.

Example:

Some of the best companies in the world were started from the absolute bare minimums. Take James Dyson for example. James was an inventor, had some ups and downs, but was fairly stable. There came a time in his life when he didn’t have too much cash to play around with. He had a big idea, yet couldn’t implement it.

Advertising

Instead of giving up, James turned to the MVP system and created a hoover out of a cereal box. (I’d love to tell you how). He hoovered the entire house twice and realized that his cheap product worked. This was step one complete; he worked with what he had where he stood and came up with something that could take him to the next step.

The Takeaway

I see so many people complaining about not having enough money, yet they haven’t even tried the basics. A world class website straight out of the gate isn’t realistic, but don’t worry. Just having something in place, a platform to build from is the most important factor. You can improve as you go, learn as you go and enable the business to move in parallel with your growing profits.

This system works very much like video games. You can afford better things and be granted access to more exclusive items/opportunities the longer you play and the further you advance. You don’t put the disk in and complete the game in 5 minutes with everything available to you.

Progression is progression, no matter how slow you go or from where you start, all that matters is that you’re moving.

Advertising

2. Be Creative

The second component is being creative. Instead of following a single given path, you need to search for ethical shortcuts, tricks, and opportunities that no one else spotted.

You see, if everyone is after the same goal, reading the same material and learning from the same companies, there will come a time where nothing differentiates you from your competitors. Being different, thinking differently and running as far outside of the box as you can definitely work in your favor when you’re broke.

Example:

Richard Branson may be the king of this strategy. When he first started out in business, before all of the billions, he too had similar issues in the financial department as I guess many of the people reading this have today. He needed sponsors for his new magazine, but of course, no one wanted to be associated with a new brand that had a small readership, no history, or proven results.

So what did Richard do?

Advertising

He contacted the biggest company that would get on the phone with him and told them that they could feature in his magazine for free with a double page spread. No catches, just a free advert that would point customers in their direction with no risk or money to be paid. The large company obviously said yes because they had no reason not to, it was free adverting.

So how did this benefit Richard?

Richard then went to smaller companies and showed evidence of this large company featuring in his magazine. To them, it seemed as though the larger company had bought a double page spread. Without hesitation, they all began signing up to Richard’s magazine and paying him for a feature. They must have thought, “If such a big company is doing it, then they must know something we don’t.” He used a form of social business proofing!

This cost Richard nothing but made him the money he needed to reach the next stage of his entrepreneurial journey. A simple creative thought that, for all we know, could have been the catalyst towards his billion-dollar fortune.

The Takeaway

Sometimes it’s the smallest, most simple and most overlooked features that can make all the difference. Having money is great, of course, it opens up opportunities, but there’s something about working with a small budget that heightens your senses, makes you hyper-aware to opportunity and more selective in how you spend what you have.

If you’re broke but have a great idea, never forget that you have the start-up advantage, something that larger companies have been trying to get back since they grew.

More by this author

daily fitness goals Fitness Is A Daily Battle short term fixes in life Why Short Term Fixes Are A Waste Of Time How to Prevent this Year’s Winter Illness with Vitamin D mens self improvement How To Improve 24 Hours A Day How An Entrepreneur Makes Money When They Don’t Have Any

Trending in Budget Activity

1 6 Easy Ways to Treat Yourself 2 7 Websites to Sell Used Stuff Profitably 3 Seven Tips to Save Money While Renovating Your Home 4 4 Ways to Make Every Penny Stretch in 2017 5 Getting Out of Debt in 4 Simple Steps

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Published on October 8, 2018

13 Incredibly Useful Tactics to Help You to Stick to Your Family Budget

13 Incredibly Useful Tactics to Help You to Stick to Your Family Budget

Are you having trouble sticking to a family budget? You aren’t alone.

Budgeting is difficult. Creating one is hard enough, but actually sticking to it is a whole other issue. Things come up. Desires and cravings happen. And the next thing you know, budgets break.

So how can you stick to a family budget? Here are 13 tips to make it easier.

1. Choose a major category each month to attack

As the saying goes, “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” With that in mind, one approach to help you get into the habit of sticking to a budget is simply starting slow.

Spend too much on Starbucks runs, eat out too often, and have an out-of-this-world grocery bill? Choose one bad habit and attack.

By choosing one behavior to focus on, you’ll prevent yourself from being overwhelmed. You’ll also experience small victories, which help you gain positive momentum. This momentum can then carry over into your overall budget.

2. Only make major purchases in the morning

If you’re making large purchases in the evening, there’s a good chance you’re doing so after a long day and you’re probably tired.

Why does this matter? Because our judgement tends to be off when tired – our willpower is compromised.

Instead, only make major purchasing decisions in the morning when you’re energized and refreshed. Your brain will be firing on all cylinders and your resolve will be high. You’re less likely to give in and settle at this point.

3. Don’t go to the grocery store hungry

Have trouble with impulse buys at the grocery store? If so, there’s a good chance you’re going grocery shopping while hungry.

The problem here is that when you’re hungry, everything looks good. So you’re more likely to make split decisions on things that aren’t on your grocery list.

Advertising

Instead, make sure you eat prior to your grocery store trip. Then take your list, along with your full stomach, and go shopping. Notice how food doesn’t look quite so good when you’re not fighting cravings.

4. Read one-star reviews for products

Is there a product you just have to have (but maybe not really)? Check out the one-star reviews.

By reading all the horrible reviews, you may be able to basically trick yourself into deciding that the product isn’t worth your time and money.

Next thing you know, you didn’t make the purchase, you saved the money, and you feel good about the decision.

5. Never buy anything you put in an online shopping cart until the next day

If you are making a purchase online, it’s typically a two-step process. First, you click “Add to Cart” and then you go in to review your cart and pay.

The problem is that there not typically much reviewing during step two. It’s generally click pay and there you go. However, this is the perfect point to stop for reflection.

Once you add to your cart, your best bet is to step away until the next day. Let the item sit there and grow cold, so to speak.

This gives you a night to “sleep on it” and decide if you really want and need to spend that money. If you wake up the next day and still find the purchase viable, then perhaps it’s time to go for it.

6. Don’t save your credit card info on any site you shop on

One of the other pitfalls of shopping online is that fact that most sites ask you to save your credit card information.

While the sites will frame it as a method of convenience, the truth is they know you’ll spend more money in the long run if your credit card information is saved.

The “convenience” takes away one last decision-making point in the purchasing process. True, it’s a pain to get out your credit card and enter the information every time. But guess what? That’s the point. If that inconvenience helps you stay on budget, then it’s worth it. Which leads into the next tip.

Advertising

7. Tape an “impulse buy” reminder to your credit card

Credit cards make spending much easier than cash. When you spend cash, you can literally see your wallet emptying. A credit card comes out, then goes back in. No harm, no foul.

That’s why it’s a good idea to tape a reminder to your credit card. Customize a message that is something along the lines of “do you really need this?” or “does it fit the budget?”

That way when you pull out the card, you get one last reminder to help you question your decision and stick to your budget.

8. Only use gift cards to shop on Amazon

Amazon is probably the easiest place online to blow money. It’s just so easy to click and buy. However, one way you can slow the process down is buy only using gift cards. Here’s how it works.

If you plan on making a purchase on Amazon, go to the grocery store and purchase a pre-loaded Amazon gift card of the proper amount. There’s no convenience fee, so you literally pay for the money you’ll spend.

Now take that gift card home and load it to your Amazon account. There’s your money to spend.

Why does this help? It makes you have to purposely go to the score and purchase the card in order to purchase the item. That’s a pretty deliberate thing that takes some time, commitment, and thought.

This process will effectively kill the impulse buy.

9. Budget using cash and envelopes

As mentioned earlier, it’s a lot harder to spend cash than swipe a credit card. You can take this even farther by using only cash, and separating that cash by budget category.

Create an envelope for each category and stick the cash in there at the beginning of each month. When the envelope is empty, no more spending on that category, unless you borrow from another (be careful of that approach).

This can be pretty helpful for people that have a hard time following transactions in their checking account, or keeping a budgeting spreadsheet.

Advertising

The envelopes simplify the tracking process, leaving no room for error. Nothing hides from you because it’s tangible in the envelopes in front of you.

10. Join a like-minded group

Making the decision to stick to something like budgeting is difficult. It takes long-term commitment.

You’re going to feel weak sometimes. And sometimes you may fail. That said, support from others can help strengthen resolve.

Support can come from a spouse or a friend, but they won’t always have the exact same goal in mind. That’s why it’s a good idea to join a support group that’s likeminded.

No need to pay here, as there are tons of free communities that fit the bill online.

For example, reddit has multiple subreddits that deal with budgeting and frugal living. You can follow, subscribe, and get active in those communities.

This will open your eyes to new tips and strategies, keep your goal fresh on your mind, and help you realize there are others dealing with the same struggles and being successful.

11. Reward Yourself

When you set a budget, it’s usually with a large goal in mind. Maybe you want to be debt free, or perhaps you want to see $10,000 in your savings account.

Whatever the case, the end goal is great, but the end is often far away, making it hard to see the end of the tunnel.

With that in mind, it’s a good idea to set mini-goals along the way. This helps you still look at the big picture but have something that’s attainable in the short-term to help with momentum.

But don’t stop there – set rewards for yourself when you reach that small goal. Maybe it’s an extra meal out. Or a new pair of shoes.

Advertising

Whatever the case, this gives you something in the near future to look forward to, which can help with the fatigue that can result in pursuing long-term goals.

12. Take the Buddhist approach

You don’t have to be a Buddhist to recognize some of the wisdom in the teachings. One of the tenets of the philosophy involves accepting that we can’t have everything we want. And that’s okay.

Sometimes you won’t feel good. Sometimes you’ll have cravings. You can’t deny them. But you can recognize them, accept them, and let them pass by. Then you move on.

Apply this to the times you want to do things that will break your budget. You’re going to have the desire to eat out when you shouldn’t. You might want to stay out and spend too much at happy hour with your work friends.

The feelings will come. Recognize them, accept them, but let them go.

13. Set up automatic drafts to savings

If you wait until you’ve spent all your budgeted money to deposit money into savings, guess what? You probably aren’t going to put any money into savings.

It’s too easy to see that as extra money and end up using it to treat yourself.

Instead, set up automatic savings withdrawals. That way, the money is marked and gone before you can even think about it. It becomes a non-issue. It’s no longer “extra.” It’s just savings.

Conclusion

Sticking to a budget can be difficult. No one is denying that.

However, if you can do a few things to set yourself up for success, and put some practices in place to curb impulse buys, then you can (and will!) be successful sticking to your family budget.

Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

Read Next