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Father’s Childbearing Age Can Hugely Affect Children’s Mental Health And Academic Performance, Science Says

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Father’s Childbearing Age Can Hugely Affect Children’s Mental Health And Academic Performance, Science Says

During the past for 40 years, it has been noticed that the average age for childbearing has increased steadily. In the US alone, for example, this has risen from 21.5 to 25.4 for women since 1970, while the average age for men is three years older. Driven by changing social trends and the advances made in medical science, we can also expect the average childbearing age to increase incrementally for both men and women in the years ahead.

What is the impact of a rising childbirth age?

While the rising age of childbirth may be an accepted and proven fact. However, its impact on both parents and their children as yet to be fully explored. This is what prompted a recent collaborative study between the Indiana University and medical researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, which set out to determine what an advanced parental age means for those involved. In particular, significant emphasis was placed on the impact of a father’s childbearing age on their child’s academic performance and emotional well-being, especially as some studies have already been focused on the potential implications of a rising childbearing age for women.

The results are subsequently backed by a vast and diverse data set, covering everyone born in Sweden between the years of 1973 and 2001. Most pointedly, they seemed to indicate that children benefit the most when born to younger parents, while those who boast younger fathers can even enjoy particularly significant advantages.

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With this in mind, let’s take a look at some of the advantages that children can gain from being born to a younger father:

1. Children born to younger fathers will enjoy far greater mental and emotional health

One of the most startling discoveries made during the survey was that children born to younger fathers are far less likely to experience some emotional and mental disorders. They are 13 times less likely to suffer from ADHD, for example, as well as being 3.5 times less likely to display autistic tendencies. Similarly, they are a staggering 25 times less likely to have a debilitating bipolar disorder, which can create seasonal periods of depression and anxiety.

Interestingly, the study also suggested that children who were born to younger fathers would be 2.5 times less likely to display suicidal behaviour or develop substance abuse problems, hinting at a more robust mental state and outlook. While there is no suggested childbearing age at which these issues become problematic, the difference between infants born to 24 and 45-year-old fathers was particularly striking.

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2. Children born to younger fathers can be less susceptible to certain illnesses

On a similar note, the study also highlighted that men are exposed to a number of harmful environmental toxins as they age. From carbon emissions and pollution to the impact of poor air quality within the home, these contaminants can combine to trigger DNA mutations within the sperm of each father. Coupled with the fact that the chance of mutation increases every time sperm replicate, this creates a genetic conundrum that fathers with an older childbearing age must consider.

In contrast, younger fathers are likely to have been exposed to far less environmental toxins and contaminants, which in turn reduces the number of mutations within their DNA. Although the vast majority of these are harmless, it is important to note that there are also disease-causing mutations which can make children more susceptible to specific disorders and physical illnesses.

Those born to younger fathers are more likely to avoid these, however, minimising the risk of them contracting certain diseases.

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3. Children born to younger fathers are more likely to achieve academically

We have already touched on the fact that children born to older fathers are more likely to suffer disorders such as ADHD. Disorders of this nature tend to impact negatively on a child’s behaviour and ability to learn, manifesting in a few potential educational issues. This logic was supported by the findings published in the survey, with children born to younger fathers recording improved grades, higher educational attainment and enhanced IQ scores.

Interestingly, the study made allowances for the higher maturity levels and earning capacity of older fathers, which could help to deliver a higher standard of education to children and negate some of the potential genetic issues. Despite this, there remains a clear link between the childbearing age of a father and their child’s academic performance.

The bottom line

Not only are these findings extremely insightful and drawn from a huge group of respondents, but they are also among the first to be focused on the impact of a father’s childbearing age. While the results cannot be applied to every individual father, and other external factors must also be considered, it is clear that a father’s childbearing age has a huge influence on the emotional, mental and physical development of their child as well as their levels of academic attainment.

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Similarly, it can also be surmised that children born to younger fathers can benefit from some genetic advantages, particularly as the likelihood of sperm mutations increases with age.

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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