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Speaking French: What Glocal Business Owners Should Know

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Speaking French: What Glocal Business Owners Should Know

Globalization has become the veritable backbone of economic growth, which makes bilingual communication a prerequisite for international business. Given the comparisons between their respective root words, English speakers often find the process of learning and speaking French straightforward, as opposed to other languages.

With 75,900,000 native speakers across 32 countries, French is second only to English in terms of global usage, and the language myself and many other young kids learned in middle and high school. An official language spanning four continents––Europe, Africa, Oceania and North America––the benefits of French fluency are extensive for business owners. However, those conducting business in this vernacular should understand that each dialect is not interchangeable. In fact, the French spoken on those cobbled avenues of Paris differs significantly from the version heard throughout Quebec, Haiti or Madagascar, for example.

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But, how can understanding the definitive features of each major French dialect positively impact your future business relations? In order to secure global partnerships, affiliations, transactions or clientele, you must accurately and succinctly communicate your intentions across any perceived language barrier. It also commands respect among your foreign business contacts:

“We have to understand the cultures where we operate. That means speaking to people there in their native language. Even at a very basic level, it’s a sign of respect,” says David Hartsoe, manager of CommScope’s Global Learning Center.

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Whether you’re a seasoned Francophone or untrained novice, this breakdown can help you recognize those nuances that differentiate one regional tongue from the next. Next time you’re speaking French to a business partner, they’ll be impressed.

Parisian French

Considered the standard form of this language, Parisian French is used throughout France’s mainland and overseas territories including French Guiana, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Réunion, and Mayotte. It’s also the version taught in most academic settings. Parisian French adheres to conventional morphology and orthography––the basis for conversing and writing in a given language. Therefore, this dialect’s rules surrounding grammar, conjugation, vocabulary, and syntax are consistent with that “French 101” semester from college.

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European French

Outside its native borders, the French vernacular sprawls across the remaining continent of Europe. There are five regionalities that comprise European French, including Aostan, Belgian, Meridional, Swiss and Jersey Legal. Some varieties like Swiss and Jersey Legal bear resemblance to Parisian French––with the exception of certain word choices––while others are more closely tied to the language spoken in that country. For instance, Aostan is merged with Italian dialects and Belgian fuses with its linguistic namesake.

Quebec French

As the predominant version of this language spoken in Canada, Quebec French sounds markedly different from Parisian French when adapted to its colloquial form––joual. The phonetic, grammatical and lexical distinctions that help you tell the two apart include verb particle omissions, spelling changes, idiomatic expressions and certain word anomalies.

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Another facet of Quebec French that conflicts with Parisian French is the integration of both English and aboriginal tongues, based on Anglophone and Iroquois influence on Canadian society.

African French

Often heard amongst political and educational spheres in the Maghreb region, African French spans 31 nations, ranking Africa as the largest concentration of French speakers worldwide. This population includes the countries of Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Mauritania, Congo, Burundi and Madagascar, among others. Given the entrenchment of tribal customs throughout this continent, African French has co-mingled with various local languages, producing distinct consonant sounds––otherwise known as alveolar trills.  

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Creole French

Tracing its origin to the Caribbean islands––Haiti, in particular––Creole French is a synthesis of Portuguese, Spanish, French and numerous West African dialects. Despite there being a strong correlation between Creole French and its Parisian predecessor, subtle yet audible variations can be heard through the speaker’s intonation. This reflects the accents, idioms, verbiage and other semantics that characterize Creole French’s unique juncture of both European and African vernaculars.

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Last Updated on August 25, 2021

Why Personal Branding Is Important to Your Career

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Why Personal Branding Is Important to Your Career

As a recruiter, I have met and interviewed hundreds of candidates who have no idea who they are.

Without a personal brand, candidates struggle to answer the question: “tell me about yourself—who are you?” They have no idea about who they are, what their strengths are, and how they can add value to the company. They present their CV’s believing that their CV is the key to their career success. In some ways, your CV still has its use. However, in today’s job market, you need more than a CV to stand out in a crowd.

According to Celinne Da Costa:[1]

“Personal brand is essentially your golden ticket to networking with the right people, getting hired for a dream job, or building an influential business.” She believes that “a strong personal brand allows you to stand out in an oversaturated marketplace by exposing desired audiences to your vision, skillset, and personality in a way that is strategically aligned with your career goals.”

A personal brand opens up your world to so many more career opportunities that you would never have been exposed to with just your CV.

What Is Your Personal Brand?

“Personal branding is how you distinctively market your uniqueness.” —Bernard Kelvin Clive

Today, the job market is very competitive and tough. Having a great CV will only let you go so far because everyone has a CV, but no one else has your distinct personal brand! It is your personal brand that differentiates you from everyone else and that is what people buy—you.

Your personal brand is your mark on the world. It is how people you interact with and the world see you. It is your legacy—it is more important than a business brand because your personal brand lasts forever.

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I have coached people who have very successful careers, and they come to me because they have suddenly found that they are not getting the opportunities or having the conversations that would them to their next role. They are having what I call a “career meltdown,” all because they have no personal brand.

A personal brand helps you become conscious of your differences and your uniqueness. It allows you to position yourself in a way that makes you stand out from the pack, especially among other potential job applicants.

Don’t get me wrong, having a great CV and a great LinkedIn profile is important. However, there are a few steps that you have to take to have a CV and LinkedIn profile that is aligned to who you are, the value you offer to the market, and the personal guarantee that you deliver results.

Building your personal brand is about strategically, creatively, and professionally presenting what makes you, you. Knowing who you are and the value you bring to the table enables you to be more informed, agile, and adaptable to the changing dynamic world of work. This is how you can avoid having a series of career meltdowns.

Your Personal Brand Is Essential for Your Career Success

In her article, Why Personal Branding Is More Important Than Ever, Caroline Castrillon outlines key reasons why a personal brand is essential for career success.

According to Castrillon,[2]

“One reason is that it is more popular for recruiters to use social media during the interview process. According to a 2018 CareerBuilder survey, 70% of employers use social media to screen candidates during the hiring process, and 43% of employers use social media to check on current employees.”

The first thing I do as a recruiter when I want to check out a candidate or coaching client is to look them up on LinkedIn or other social media platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Your digital footprint is the window that highlights to the world who you are. When you have no control over how you want to be seen, you are making a big mistake because you are leaving it up to someone else to make a judgment for you as to who you are.

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As Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, once said, “Your brand is what people say about you when you are not in the room.”

In her book, Becoming, Michelle Obama writes about the importance of having a personal brand and her journey to defining her personal brand. She wrote that:

“if you don’t get out there and define yourself, you’ll be quickly and inaccurately defined by others.”

When you have a personal brand, you are in control. You know exactly what people will say about you when you leave the room.

The magic of a personal brand is that gives you control over how you want to be seen in the world. Your confidence and self-belief enable you to leverage opportunities and make informed decisions about your career and your future. You no longer experience the frustrations of a career meltdown or being at a crossroads not knowing what to do next with your career or your life. With a personal brand, you have focus, clarity, and a strategy to move forward toward future success.

Creating your personal brand does not happen overnight. It takes a lot of work and self-reflection. You will be expected to step outside of your comfort zone not once, but many times.

The good news is that the more time you spend outside of your comfort zone, the more you will like being there. Being outside of your comfort zone is where you can test the viability of and fine-tune your personal brand.

5 Key Steps to Creating Your Personal Brand

These five steps will help you create a personal brand that will deliver you the results you desire with your career and in life.

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1. Set Your Personal Goals

What is it that you want to do in the next five years? What will your future self be doing in the next five to ten years? What is important to you? If you can answer these questions, then you are on the right path. If not, then you have to start thinking about them.

2. Create Your Unique Value Proposition

Create your unique value proposition by asking yourself these four questions:

  1. What are your personality features? What benefit do you offer people?
  2. Who are you and why do people enjoy working with you?
  3. What do you do and what do people want you to do for them? How do you solve their problems?
  4. What makes you different from others like you?

The answers to these questions will give you the information you need to create your professional story, which is the key step to creating your personal brand.

3. Write Your Professional Story

Knowing who you are, what you want, and the unique value you offer is essential to you creating your professional story. People remember stories. Your personal story incorporates your value proposition and tells people who you are and what makes you unique. This is what people will remember about you.

4. Determine Which Platforms Will Support Your Personal Brand

Decide which social media accounts and online platforms will best represent your brand and allow you to share your voice. In a professional capacity, having a LinkedIn profile and a CV that reflects your brand is key to your positioning in relation to role opportunities. People will be connecting with you because they will like the story you are telling.

5. Become Recognized for Sharing Your Knowledge and Expertise

A great way for you to promote yourself is by sharing knowledge and helping others. This is where you prove you know your stuff and you gain exposure for doing so. You can do this through social media, writing, commenting, video, joining professional groups, networking, etc. Find your own style and uniqueness and use it to attract clients, the opportunities, or the jobs you desire.

The importance of having a personal brand is not going to go away. In fact, it is the only way where you can stand out and be unique in a complex changing world of work. If you don’t have a personal brand, someone will do it for you. If you let this happen, you have no control and you may not like the story they create.

Standing out from others takes time and investment. Most people cannot make the change by themselves, and this is where engaging a personal brand coach is a viable option to consider.

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As a personal brand coach, working with my clients to create their personal brand is my passion. I love the fact that we can work together to create a personal story that defines exactly what people will say when you leave the room.

Other People’s Stories

Listening to other people’s stories is a great way to learn. In his article, 7 TED Talks About Personal Branding, Rafael Dos Santos presents the best Ted Talks where speakers share their stories about the “why,” “what,” and “how” of personal branding.((GuidedPR: 7 TED Talks About Personal Branding))

Take some time out to listen to these speakers sharing their stories and thoughts about personal branding. You will definitely learn so much about how you can start your journey of defining yourself and taking control of your professional and personal life.

Your personal brand, without a doubt, is your secret weapon to your career success. As Michelle Obama said,

“your story is what you have, what you will always have. It is something to own.”

So, go own your story. Go on the journey to create your personal brand that defines who you are, highlights your uniqueness, and the value you offer to the world.

Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

Reference

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