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5 Best-Paying Jobs for People with Investigative Personality Type

5 Best-Paying Jobs for People with Investigative Personality Type

Are you good at understanding and analyzing situations? Are you fond of solving math or science problems? If you said yes to both these questions, then you may have an investigative personality.

The investigative personality types, also called “thinkers,”are those people who are more introspective, inquisitive, methodical, and analytical. They prefer doing tasks that border on scientific and technical – and mostly rely on their thoughts, investigation, and observations to come up with a result.

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This personality type is based on the Holland Codes or Holland Occupational Themes (RIASEC), which is a theory of careers originally invented by John L. Holland, an American psychologist and professor of sociology at Johns Hopkins University.  The other five types of personality types include the Realistic, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional.

Holland's theory
                           Holland’s Theory. Image via careernz

    Choosing a career path that fits well with your personality is the most important thing to consider when you want to be successful in your field. People who have personalities that fit their jobs and environment well tend to flourish and become happier than those who don’t. Here are seven of the top jobs that fit well for people with investigative personality type.

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    1. Computer Programmer

    People with investigative personality are well suited in the fields of computer science and technology. As a field that focuses on application of computer-based technologies, computer programmers must comprehend difficult commands in order to create computer codes. This job also needs a lot of concentration since programmers have to write lines of codes for long periods of time. As of May 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports show that the annual wage for computer programmers amount to $44, 450 – $130,800.

    2. Archaeologist

    It’s not just digging. Archaeologists are as much researchers and scientists as the next guy in a white lab coat. However, instead of helping us understand medical conditions or technology, archeologists help people understand history through studying archeological sites and material remains. They are also concerned with conservation and long term storage for their finds in order to preserve the history the item holds.

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    For this reason a career in archaeology is best suited for people with investigative personality. They should be able to solve problems and visualize scenarios to analyze their findings. They need to possess both intellectual curiosity and rationality. Archaeologists also have to be careful in detail and have a methodical approach in his work. As of 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics report shows that the annual wage for archaeologists and anthropologists amount to $35,440 to $97,040

    3. Crime Scene Investigator

    Maybe you watch too much CSI and have a real passion for solving crimes. If so, a job as a crime scene investigator is perfect for you.Crime scene investigators are one of the most common jobs in forensic science. Crime scene investigators must clean crime scenes to gather physical evidence and analyze it. Because of this CSIs also need to have master analytical skills. They need to be able to keep track of their findings, and put the pieces together to layout the crime scene. As of May 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics report shows that the annual wage for crime scene investigators amount to 34,000$ to $94,410.

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    4. Investigative Journalist

    Investigative journalism is a challenging profession which requires more than writing skills and charisma. In this field you will need to have a passion for truth, inquiring mind, and an investigative personality. The journalist also has to have self-discipline and the best organizational techniques to become a careful planner. As of May 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics report shows that the annual wage for journalists, reporters and correspondents amount to $21,390 to $81,580.

    5. Statistician

    Most people have no or only limited understanding about the importance of studying statistics. Being a statistician is all about evaluating data. Aside from great technical and analytical skills, a statistician also needs to have the skills to distinguish good from faulty reasoning. He should understand and apply complicated technical concepts to problems. Statisticians are people with keen attention to detail, someone who loves examining and questioning everything. It goes without saying that statisticians are also people that are good in math. As of May 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics report shows that the annual wage for statisticians amount to $44,900 to $130,630.

    Featured photo credit: Dương Trần Quốc via hd.unsplash.com

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    Last Updated on March 30, 2020

    How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

    How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

    Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

    • Intro to Visual Facilitation
      • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
    • Structure
      • Why, What, How to, What If
    • Do It Myself?
      • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
    • Specialize Offering?
      • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

    This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

    You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

    To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

    What Is a Mind Map?

    A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

    In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

    The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

      Image Credit: English Central

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      By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

      3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

      The three steps are:

      1. Set a central topic
      2. Add branches of related ideas
      3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

      Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

      Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

      Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

      Word it in a clear and concise manner.

        What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

          Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

          Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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            You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

            In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

            Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

            Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

            Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

              I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

              In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

              Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

              You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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              • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
              • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
              • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

              Branch by Branch

              Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

                Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                  A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                    Level by Level

                    In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                      Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                        Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                          Free-Flow

                          Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                            I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                            What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                            Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                            The Bottom Line

                            When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                            If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                            More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                            Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                            Reference

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