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5 Best Ways To Protect Your Computer From Ransomware

5 Best Ways To Protect Your Computer From Ransomware

No malicious software is potentially as harmful as ransomware. This malware variety is used by notorious cyber criminals to intrude computers and gain access to sensitive data, which are then held ransom with the intention to extort money from the victim. While many people gladly oblige with the attackers demands to get back their files, there is no guarantee that they would in fact get what was promised after the payment has been made. The use of ransomware is becoming an increasingly popular way of extorting money due to the sheer negligence of consumers and companies.

There is a variety of ransomware that can intrude a system and exploit the vulnerabilities to install itself silently on the victim’s computer. This guide will teach you how to protect your computer from these threats so that your system does not fall victim to this harrowing ordeal. Here are 5 best ways to protect your computer from ransomware.

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1. Regularly backup your data.

The best thing you can do to prevent ransomware infection is regularly backup your data. Many a time, the attackers take control of the user’s files leaving them no choice but to give in to their demands. If you have important data stored in a safe location such as in an external hard drive, USB pen drive, or CD/DVDs, you can get back your data from backup storage location and avoid being hassled.

Cloud-based platforms are also a great option for storing data to secure servers without spending extra money on buying physical drives.

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2. Double check email identity.

If you receive any unexpected mail from a new or suspicious address, it is best to verify its legitimacy before downloading any attachment or complying with any request made by the sender. It doesn’t matter if the email comes from your bank or a personal contact; be sure to get in touch with them personally to enquire if indeed they have sent the mail. Do not solely rely on the virtue of relationships because your family or friends may also fall prey to spammers and hackers, who might be using their guise to deceive you.

3. Filter .pdf and .exe files.

Most executable malware, viruses, and ransomware come in either in. pdf or. exe file extensions. It would be easier to spot suspicious files if you have the default Windows option “hide known file extensions” turned off because then you’ll be able to see the files full extension. Also, do not download any .exe file from emails coming from a new or suspicious address just to be on the safer side. The better option to legitimately exchange executable files is via password protected zip files or through cloud services.

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4. Have good antivirus software in handy.

Take the best protection you can by having both anti-malware and antivirus firewall installed on your computer. The firewall would help in identifying and filtering known suspicious files and other malicious behavior that would otherwise go unrecognized.

If the firewall fails for any reason, the anti-malware tool will be there to detect anomalies and eliminate the suspicious files that can potentially harm your computer. Since malware authors use a variety of methods to avoid detection, it is crucial that you keep your malware and virus protection tools up to date for an additional layer of security against attacks.

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5. Avoid visiting suspicious sites.

You’ve heard it numerous times how visiting suspicious and illegal sites can harm your computer, but still decided to do it anyway. Well, you may have got lucky last time, but it is best that you don’t try and push your luck further because it is bound to run out sooner or later. There is no lack of malicious sites on the web operated by hackers with the sole intention of stealing data from the visitor’s computer. Ransomware may also be transmitted the same way, through a website that may ask you to use a plug-in in order to play a video or download an executable file to run a program.

So, be careful about the websites you visit and download files only from trusted sources. Again, a reputable antivirus firewall can help you in this scenario by notifying you about the legitimacy of a particular website.

Featured photo credit: Wikipedia via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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