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How To Get Yourself Highly Motivated All the Time By Using This Golden Rule

How To Get Yourself Highly Motivated All the Time By Using This Golden Rule

While we all have goals and aspirations in life, conceiving these is far easier than executing them. In this respect, learning how to motivate yourself is central to the accomplishment of goals, while it is also one of the hardest things that you can ever do in life.

The main reason for this is that anything truly worth accomplishing is difficult to achieve, meaning that you are likely to endure hardship and setbacks along the way. Let’s say that you start a specific diet, for example, and showcase incredible enthusiasm in the first few weeks. As the excitement begins to fade and the realities of a stringent diet take hold, however, it is easy to lose motivation and lose sight of your long-term goal.

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The Goldilocks rule: What is it and how does it manifest itself?

While hardship and setbacks can impact on your level of motivation, so too can the nature of the goal itself. This is something that can often be overlooked when you learn how to motivate yourself, despite the fact that studies have consistently found that the establishing goals of manageable difficulty is central to remaining focused. This is commonly referred to as the ‘Goldilocks Rule’, which stipulates that our ability to stay motivated will falter when pursuing goals that are outside of an optimal range of difficulty.

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To explain this further, let’s continue with the example of starting a diet. Within a short space of time, you may find yourself losing weight and approaching the initial goal that you set. As the pace of your progress slows and the difficulty eases, you are likely to find your motivation wane accordingly. Similarly, those who have a huge amount of weight to lose to achieve their goal will struggle to remain motivated from the outset, as the scale of their task makes it seemingly impossible.

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The Goldilocks rule applies to the pursuit of every goal, even in instances where you must also consult your values and morals. We have seen a huge rise in the number of academic essay writing tools, for example, which allow students to outsource their dissertations and coursework requirements. The popularisation of essay writing services can be largely attributed to the principle of the Goldilocks rule, as students tend to outsource simple pieces that they deem non-challenging or complex and crucial posts that are exceptionally difficult to complete within the given time-frame.

Apply the Goldilocks rule and learn how to motivate yourself

As we can see, the Goldilocks rule establishes an optimal range of difficulty that distinguishes positive and attainable goals. This taps into the concept that humans are at their most motivated when they undertake tasks that are on the very edge of their ability, as they seek a balance between challenging themselves and making progress along their specific course. Understanding this is the first and arguably most important part of learning how to motivate yourself and successfully pursuing goals, as otherwise you will constantly find yourself either lacking in mental stimulation or overwhelmed by the task in hand.

Following the Goldilocks Rule also enables you to unlock another motivational key, which lies in the measurement of your progress and development as an individuals. It is through the accomplishment of manageable challenges that we are able to achieve happiness, for example, as they provide us with an opportunity to make progress in life and experience the diverse benefits of this. If we are able to measure our success and personal development on a regular basis, we can achieve a positive mental flow that enables us to embrace challenges, drive consistent performance and achieve our goals over a concerted period of time.

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Last Updated on October 6, 2020

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

15 Things Highly Confident People Don’t Do

Highly confident people believe in their ability to achieve. If you don’t believe in yourself, why should anyone else put their faith in you? To walk with swagger and improve your self-confidence, watch out for these fifteen things highly confident people don’t do.

And if you want to know the difference between an arrogant person and a confident person, watch this video first:

 

1. They don’t make excuses.

Highly confident people take ownership of their thoughts and actions. They don’t blame the traffic for being tardy at work; they were late. They don’t excuse their short-comings with excuses like “I don’t have the time” or “I’m just not good enough”; they make the time and they keep on improving until they are good enough.

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2. They don’t avoid doing the scary thing.

Highly confident people don’t let fear dominate their lives. They know that the things they are afraid of doing are often the very same things that they need to do in order to evolve into the person they are meant to be.

3. They don’t live in a bubble of comfort.

Highly confident people avoid the comfort zone, because they know this is a place where dreams die. They actively pursue a feeling of discomfort, because they know stretching themselves is mandatory for their success.

4. They don’t put things off until next week.

Highly confident people know that a good plan executed today is better than a great plan executed someday. They don’t wait for the “right time” or the “right circumstances”, because they know these reactions are based on a fear of change. They take action here, now, today – because that’s where progress happens.

5. They don’t obsess over the opinions of others.

Highly confident people don’t get caught up in negative feedback. While they do care about the well-being of others and aim to make a positive impact in the world, they don’t get caught up in negative opinions that they can’t do anything about. They know that their true friends will accept them as they are, and they don’t concern themselves with the rest.

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6. They don’t judge people.

Highly confident people have no tolerance for unnecessary, self-inflicted drama. They don’t feel the need to insult friends behind their backs, participate in gossip about fellow co-workers or lash out at folks with different opinions. They are so comfortable in who they are that they feel no need to look down on other people.

7. They don’t let lack of resources stop them.

Highly confident people can make use of whatever resources they have, no matter how big or small. They know that all things are possible with creativity and a refusal to quit. They don’t agonize over setbacks, but rather focus on finding a solution.

8. They don’t make comparisons.

Highly confident people know that they are not competing with any other person. They compete with no other individual except the person they were yesterday. They know that every person is living a story so unique that drawing comparisons would be an absurd and simplistic exercise in futility.

9. They don’t find joy in people-pleasing.

Highly confident people have no interest in pleasing every person they meet. They are aware that not all people get along, and that’s just how life works. They focus on the quality of their relationships, instead of the quantity of them.

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10. They don’t need constant reassurance.

Highly confident people aren’t in need of hand-holding. They know that life isn’t fair and things won’t always go their way. While they can’t control every event in their life, they focus on their power to react in a positive way that moves them forward.

11. They don’t avoid life’s inconvenient truths.

Highly confident people confront life’s issues at the root before the disease can spread any farther. They know that problems left unaddressed have a way of multiplying as the days, weeks and months go by. They would rather have an uncomfortable conversation with their partner today than sweep an inconvenient truth under the rug, putting trust at risk.

12. They don’t quit because of minor set-backs.

Highly confident people get back up every time they fall down. They know that failure is an unavoidable part of the growth process. They are like a detective, searching for clues that reveal why this approach didn’t work. After modifying their plan, they try again (but better this time).

13. They don’t require anyone’s permission to act.

Highly confident people take action without hesitation. Every day, they remind themselves, “If not me, who?”

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14. They don’t limit themselves to a small toolbox.

Highly confident people don’t limit themselves to Plan A. They make use of any and all weapons that are at their disposal, relentlessly testing the effectiveness of every approach, until they identify the strategies that offer the most results for the least cost in time and effort.

15. They don’t blindly accept what they read on the Internet as “truth” without thinking about it.

Highly confident people don’t accept articles on the Internet as truth just because some author “said so”. They look at every how-to article from the lens of their unique perspective. They maintain a healthy skepticism, making use of any material that is relevant to their lives, and forgetting about the rest. While articles like this are a fun and interesting thought-exercise, highly confident people know that they are the only person with the power to decide what “confidence” means.

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