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Can You Spot What’s Wrong With This Photo? It Carries a Message That Everyone Should Know

Can You Spot What’s Wrong With This Photo? It Carries a Message That Everyone Should Know

We all live glued to our smartphones. We do everything on these devices, from talking to friends and making plans to catching up on the news. Some of us, including myself, even use our phones as a way to keep up with work. In fact, few of us know what happiness is if it doesn’t involve our phones.

But what would be like if we didn’t have our phones? Would we be able to see how disconnected we’ve become?

Photographer Eric Pickersgill, a photographer living and working in North Carolina, endeavored to find out. His impressive project REMOVED highlights what human interaction looks like by just removing smartphones from his pictures.

The results are astonishing. The images are stark, giving us a glimpse into our reality — that we spend more time looking at a screen than each other.

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And it got me to thinking — is my phone that important to me? What could I be doing instead of looking at it? So I tried it for a few days. It was amazing.

Here’s what I learned:

We do almost all of our communication through our phones, making real-world interactions awkward.

Sleeping_without_phones_by_Eric_Pickersgill

    We’re more interested in the instant gratification of social media than interacting with friends.

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    Friends_together_without_phones_by_Eric_Pickersgill

      We’re addicted to our phones and even on special occasions we keep the devices close.

      Just_married_without_phones_by_Eric_Pickersgill

        We’re not aware of, or present in, our surroundings, leading us to miss out on the beauty of life.

        Friends_relaxing_without_Eric_Pickersgill

          Our kids are learning how to avoid important issues rather than learning how to confront them.

          Mom_and_Daughter_without_phones_by_Eric_Pickersgill

            We spend more time looking at our smartphones than we do looking at each other.

            Couples_relaxing_without_phones_by_Eric_Pickersgill

              We’re teaching our kids that personal interactions aren’t necessary.

              Family_without_phones_by_Eric_Pickersgill

                We’re forgetting how to be bored, and we’re passing that on to the next generation.

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                Kids_without_phones_by_Eric_Pickersgill

                  The idea that smartphones are replacing most of our interactions and making boredom nearly extinct isn’t exactly new, but it is one we need to confront as a society. Even our kids are being affected, with outdoor play being replaced by games and texting they can do from the comfort of their smartphone. And this is an issue that isn’t going anywhere.

                  But all is not lost. More and more, people are taking a break from their phones to be present in their lives, and it’s leading them to make better choices in their lives. Everyone, from children to adults, is learning that happiness can be found right outside their door.

                  As for me, I now only check my phone a few times a day. I’ve disabled all social media on my device, and I’m surprised to find that I’m much happier this way. It’s also had an effect on my husband, who’s going through a smartphone detox right now.

                  So what about you? Do you think you could live without your phone? Is it possible to find happiness through conversations and activities in the real world? Let us know in the comments below and let’s start a conversation.

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                  To learn more about Eric Pickersgill and the impact his project has had, read this.

                  Featured photo credit: Couple in bed, Friends in Garage, Newlyweds on car, Friends sitting next to each other, Mother and daughter on couch, Couple on couch, Family in kitchen, Children on Couch via Collective Evolution and Eric Pickersgill

                  Featured photo credit: Ashley’s Neighbors by Eric Pickersgill via collective-evolution.com

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                  Last Updated on August 16, 2018

                  10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

                  10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

                  The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

                  In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

                  Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

                  1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

                  What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

                  Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

                  2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

                  Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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                  How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

                  Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

                  Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

                  3. Get comfortable with discomfort

                  One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

                  Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

                  4. See failure as a teacher

                  Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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                  Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

                  Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

                  10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

                  5. Take baby steps

                  Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

                  Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

                  Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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                  The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

                  6. Hang out with risk takers

                  There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

                  Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

                  7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

                  Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

                  Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

                  8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

                  What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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                  9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

                  Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

                  If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

                  10. Focus on the fun

                  Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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