Advertising
Advertising

5 Signs of A Micromanager You Need to be Aware of

5 Signs of A Micromanager You Need to be Aware of

Micromanagers historically have a bad rap, largely due to the negative effect they have on the business and it’s employees. Staff feels disempowered, opportunity and innovation are stifled and the management technique gives rise to poor performance.

“Absolutely no one likes to be micro-managed. It’s frustrating, demoralizing, and demotivating.” Miguel Maignan Wilkins, Harvard Business Review

Given the negative connotations associated with micromanaging, how do you know you are being micromanaged? What are the signs of a micromanager that you need to be aware of? Here are five!

Advertising

1. They never let you drive a decision.

A micromanager craves being in control, as such they will rarely allow you to drive a decision. They struggle to relinquish control. They will maintain control over everything through (among other things):

  1. Requesting constant updates perhaps through e-mail or meetings (over and above the pre-determined checkpoints for a project).
  2. Require you to cc them in all e-mail correspondence relating to a project.
  3. Send you e-mails asking you for the status of the project.

After collecting the information they need they’ll make the decisions and never let you contribute. Not only is your productivity affected as you have to attend meetings and respond to e-mails, it’s demoralizing.

2. They are always complaining about something.

They are perfectionists and thus pay attention to the closest detail. They believe that the only way for something to get done properly is if they do it themselves. Consequently, they will never be 100% happy with how you performed the task and they will never be totally happy with the deliverables. They will complain about the mistakes you made, and mention how you should have done it. They will tell you that they could have done it better.

Advertising

For example, consider a proposal you have completed in line with the exact requirements. You complete it and send it to your employer for review, only to find a horde of changes and additions as a result of their excessive attention to detail.

3. They are unable or unwilling to pass knowledge / skills on to you.

Their desire to be in control means that they don’t pass knowledge onto you, knowledge which in effect would allow you to complete a task more efficiently and in a timely manner. This, in turn, leads to you as the employee not being empowered, which causes huge frustration.

For example, they might require that a project proposal follows a specific format. Instead of properly providing you with the format and/or the skills to make the necessary formatting changes, they will rather allow struggling through the process so that they can make the necessary changes after you have completed it.

Advertising

Not only does micromanagement have a direct negative impact on employees and business, but also on the micromanager. Through focusing on minor, pointless tasks, their own productivity is diminished.

4. They monitor you very closely.

A micromanager will observe and monitor you closely. This behavior stems from several sources:

  1. Lack of trust in your abilities; they believe they can do things better.
  2. Being a perfectionist as they pay attention to the smallest detail (while positive in some instances, excessive attention to detail can be crippling).
  3. Allows them to maintain a sense of control that they deeply crave.

Monitoring will take a variety of forms as outlined in point 1. You may even hear from a work colleague that your micro-manager asked them where you were when you were out of the office.

Advertising

5. They accuse you of the pettiest things.

Their excessive attention to details causes them to knit-pick on the smallest things, the smallest detail, which may not even have relevance to the project as a whole. All it does do though, causes frustration and creates an environment of unhappiness. Employee job satisfaction is diminished as a result.

More by this author

Nick Darlington

Nick is a Multipotentialite, an entrepreneur, a blogger and a traveler.

Study Says Art Makes You Mentally Healthier, Even If You’re Not Good At It When You Can Stop Yourself From Multitasking, Your Brain Will Start To Change How Silence Affects Our Brains in A Good Way, Science Explains 5 Things That Will Happen When You Wake Up Two Hours Earlier For A Month Why Overthinkers Are Probably Creative Problem-Solvers

Trending in Productivity

1 7 Ways To Stop Being Lazy And Start Getting Things Done 2 How Does Setting Goals Lead to Success? 3 9 Best Calendar Apps to Stay on Track in 2020 4 Your Night Routine Guide to Sleeping Better & Waking Up Productive 5 6 Things To Do Every Day To Ensure You Stick To Your Goals

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on July 2, 2020

7 Ways To Stop Being Lazy And Start Getting Things Done

7 Ways To Stop Being Lazy And Start Getting Things Done

“I’m going to take a lazy day today.”

Okay, there’s nothing wrong with this. It’s called a day off, and it’s a magical thing.

But when every day is a “lazy day,” there’s a problem. Sometimes we just need a kick in the butt to get us up and moving, so we can handle our business effectively.

Often, laziness has a deeper and darker cause that we don’t want to think about, let alone acknowledge. Here are 7 ways to stop being lazy and become more productive.

1 Find Out the Root Cause

Are you burned out from working 27 hours a day, 9 days a week since before you can remember? This is a signal that you need a rest or a change.

Advertising

Human beings are not meant to work all the time. Our paleolithic ancestors worked, on average, about 20 hours a week. (Yeah, we members of modern society are getting hosed.) Maybe you feel overwhelmed, are afraid to fail at the task, or you just don’t want to do the task; these are discrete problems with separate solutions.

Finding out the root cause of your laziness can help you make the changes you need to make to be a more effective and energetic person.

2. Find Your Passion for the Work

You started doing what you do for a reason, but sometimes, even the tasks we love the most can become dreary and mundane. When this happens, remind yourself why you started doing it in the first place.

You must have had a passion for it at some point, or you wouldn’t be bothering with it. Remind yourself of the good points of the work, not just the parts that suck.

3. Break up Your Time

People work more efficiently when they have ample rest time. Working in short, focused bursts is far more effective than trying to slog through the task all at once. Not only will you be happier with the end product, but you’ll feel better and more energized after completing it.

Advertising

Learn about The Importance of Scheduling Downtime.

4. Look at Ways You Can Do the Task More Efficiently

When possible, work smarter instead of harder.

We’ve already talked about why working hard doesn’t work as well. If you can find a better way to do the task, you’re more likely to enjoy it because you’re not simply performing the task by rote, but rather, using your creativity and imagination to their best effect. This will make you feel better about the job and probably enjoy it more, too.

Try these 12 Ways to Work Smart.

5. Ask for Help or Support

Sometimes, we just need a little extra backup. There’s nothing wrong with asking for help from a more motivated coworker, friend, or family member. This is a useful way to get you up and moving, because they will motivate you to do the task.

Advertising

At the same time, you may be doing them a favor by motivating them to work harder. A little friendly competition never hurt anyone!

Learn How to Ask for Help When You’re Afraid To Do So.

6. Think About Why You Don’t Want to Do the Task

This sounds like a rehash of number 1, but it’s really not.

Some jobs we don’t want to do because they’re just not fun. Mowing the lawn, cleaning the house, or getting under the car and replacing the alternator all have one thing in common. People don’t like doing these jobs because they take time and energy, they’re not pleasant, and we know that sooner or later, we’ll just be doing the same thing all over again.

However, instead of thinking about why you don’t want to do the task, think about the benefits. Your car will run better, the Homeowners’ Association won’t be leaving you a nasty gram for the sixth time this month, and your house will look nicer and feel more welcoming.

Advertising

By turning a negative into a positive, you’ll find your outlook about these tasks will be more positive too.

7. Force Yourself

Sometimes there’s just no getting around it. All the good advice and wishes in the world won’t make the job look any better. In these cases, you need to remember you’re an intelligent, mature member of Homo Sapiens, and get off your butt.

While it may not be fun at the time, you can look back on the task you did later and say, “Yeah. I did that.” You shouldn’t have to force yourself out of bed every morning (this is a warning sign of depression that you should NOT ignore), but every once in a while, we need to force ourselves to do something we just don’t want to do.

Believe it or not, you’ll be proud of yourself once the task is done.

More Motivational Tips

Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

Read Next