Advertising
Advertising

7 Mind-Changing Books Every Woman Should Read By Her 30

7 Mind-Changing Books Every Woman Should Read By Her 30

Turning 30 is an epic milestone for any woman. You are embarking on a new decade and have a clearer perspective of who you are and where you are going. You are still young enough to stay one step ahead of Mother Nature–everything is still firm and bouncy–yet old enough to have gained wisdom from experience and developed a healthy respect for Father Time.

And for some reason, at 30, you faintly begin to hear the clock ticking.

We’re here to help.

Below is a list of inspirational books every woman should read before turning 30. This eclectic selection of inspirational books focuses on topics that will assist you in understanding your identity, shaping your worldview, laying the foundation for fulfillment, and assisting you in setting and reaching goals in all aspects of life.

The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

Advertising

The Year of Magical Thinking

    Death is a part of life. And when people die–or we experience death in other aspects of our lives (i.e. loss of job, going through breakups, or moving to a different city)–we need to grieve. However, there are few instructions on how to grieve. This inspirational book is a guide on how to adapt and overcome.

    The 21 Day Financial Fast by Michelle Singletary

    21 Day Financial Fast

      How we deal with and relate to money is more mental and emotional than most realize or would like to admit. In The 21-Day Financial Fast, Michelle Singletary, award-winning writer and nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, proposes a field-tested financial challenge, while also taking you on a journey of self discovery. This book is not your average financial or money managing how to book. This book guides you in reflecting on your spending habits and examining why you spend the way you do. It makes you take a hard look at your relationship with money.

      To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

      To Kill a Mockingbird

        This is a must-read. If you read this in your high school English Literature class, please read it again.

        Advertising

        One of the most inspirational books of all time, this epic tale by the iconic Harper Lee, is compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving. It explores the very essence of human behavior–innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. You will laugh and cry, rejoice and mourn. This is not just a book; it is an experience that will leave you questioning your own convictions and searching your soul–two processes that are an essential part of the rite of passage every new 30-year-old should undergo.

        The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell

        Tipping Point

          By now you have, or are developing, a pretty good sense of where you would like to go in life. You know the direction you would like your career to head. Getting there may still be a challenge. The Tipping Point is just the book to help you understand how to turn a big idea into reality and how to expand your reach in the market place.

          “The best way to understand the dramatic transformation of unknown books into bestsellers, or the rise of teenage smoking, or the phenomena of word of mouth or any number of the other mysterious changes that mark everyday life,” writes author Malcolm Gladwell, “is to think of them as epidemics. Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread just like viruses do.”

          The Purpose Driven Life: What on Earth Am I Here For? by Rick Warren

          Advertising

          The purpose driven life

            You are at the perfect age to really digest and apply the materials found in this profoundly thought-provoking and inspirational book. Rick Warren guides you through the process of answering one of life’s most fundamental questions: Why am I here?

            In this wildly popular easy read, you are challenged to examine your thinking and find your true purpose in life–whatever that is. The concepts here respect the diversity and individuality of every person and dares you to engage in a quest to find the ultimate purpose for your life.

            White Teeth by Zadie Smith

            White Teeth

              By now you understand that the world is a complicated place. You once thought you had it all figured out, but at 30 you have experienced enough to know that you will never have it all figured out. White Teeth flows along this stream.

              This book takes on the big themes–faith, race, gender, history, and culture–with poignancy and humor. This book is witty, yet tangled. The plot is rich, and squares up to the two questions which gnaw at the very roots of our modern condition: Who are we? Why are we here?

              Advertising

              Persuasion by Jane Austen

              Persuasion

                This is a gentle satire that is set in the mid 1800s, but its themes and conflicts truly transcend time. It is described in The Huffington Post as being a “quiet story of youthful impressionability, living with regret, and finding second chances, full of wisdom for those of us suffering life’s first knocks and looking back on our first big mistakes.”

                This is not just a simple love story. It combines wit, social criticism and an examination of different kinds of love–the love between friends, the love of one’s own sense of integrity, and the love of a man and a woman–in a tremendously skillful way.

                More by this author

                Denise Hill

                Speech Writer/Senior Editor

                30 Best Business Podcasts That Help Entrepreneurs Become Successful 20 Simple Ways to Bring Positive Energy into Your Life Right Now Day 10 Shocking! Exercise Right After Eating Ain’t That Bad for Health The 10 Best Nonfiction Books Of All Time You Should Not Miss How to Stay Motivated Even Though You Can’t See Yourself Moving Forward

                Trending in Communication

                1 Feeling Stuck in Life? How to Never Get Stuck Again 2 Practical Advice for Overcoming Problems in INFP Relationships 3 How to Live up to Your Full Potential and Succeed in Life 4 7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience 5 5 Steps to Master Networking Skills and Perfect Your Personal Branding

                Read Next

                Advertising
                Advertising

                Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                1. Connecting them with each other

                Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

                Advertising

                It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                2. Connect with their emotions

                Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

                Advertising

                3. Keep going back to the beginning

                Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

                Advertising

                Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                5. Entertain them

                While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

                Advertising

                6. Appeal to loyalty

                Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

                Read Next