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6 Great Movies To Help Your Kid Fight Bullying

6 Great Movies To Help Your Kid Fight Bullying

Not long ago, I stumbled upon a very cool article – Cinematography Comes To The Aid: What Movies Can Help Your Teen Go Through Bullying. As a mom, I was very curious about this topic and I realized that I could come up with my own list of such movies.

My kid is only nine but he has already experienced some bullying. Knowing how many kids face this problem every day, parents should be aware of this issue and talk about it regularly. Even if your kid is not bullied, it is important to teach them about the phenomenon and its possible consequences. The following movies can be a great way to start such a conversation.

Harry Potter (2001)

If by some magical coincidence, your kids haven’t seen the Harry Potter series, you cannot but introduce this world to them. They will not only be fascinated by the wizards, extraordinary creatures, and magical spells but can also learn some valuable lessons.

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Harry Potter was bullied by his family and other kids at Hogwarts. He suffered a great deal of pranks, humiliation, and rejection. Nevertheless, he stays strong, fights all the enemies and finds comfort in his true friends. That is the best way to fight bullying and every kid should see and understand that.

Cyberbully (2015)

Cyberbullying is a modern way of bullying that involves no physical harm, but is as dangerous and hurtful. Cyberbully movie shows all the serious consequences that cyberbullying can lead to. This is a story of Casey who is harassed by unknown hacker online. This hacker threats her with posting her nude pictures online and shaming her.

Casey doesn’t know why it is happening to her until this person says that he helps victims of cyberbullying. She is confused, but then he shows her all the things that she has said and done online and how they influenced other people and even brought one girl to suicide. The movie is very important to see for both sides – bullies and bullied. It shows that an ostensibly innocent comment can hurt people’s feelings and bring to serious troubles.

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The Duff (2015)

This one is a teen comedy about school hierarchy. Bianca finds out one day that she is labeled The Duff – ‘designated ugly fat friend’ to her beautiful girlfriends. Her world changes and she decides to do something about it.

On her way to becoming cool and popular (while her friends actually turn their back on her and bully her), she realizes that the most important thing is to be yourself and not to pay attention to all the stereotypes and myths. This movie is great for kids and teens who have self-esteem and bullying problems.

Odd Girl Out (2005)

This is another teen movie telling about teenage conflicts and intrigues. The main character, Vanessa, is rejected by all of her friends after they find out that she has a crush on the same boy as the most popular girl in school. She suddenly becomes an outcast and everybody calls her names and seems to hate her. It goes even further when they create a website and post humiliating pictures of Vanessa.

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After a big amount of humiliation, pranks, name calling and a suicide attempt, Vanessa realizes that her desire to be friends with those people again doesn’t make any sense. She realizes that popularity is not everything and being a “cool kid” is not that important.

This movie proves how easily kids get into bullies and how cruel they can be. Kids who bully their classmates at school need to see this movie to realize that it’s wrong. And those kids who are being bullied can see that they are not alone and there are ways out.

The Karate Kid (1984)

This is a fun movie to watch with the whole family. It’s about a bullied teen Daniel who decides to learn Karate to be able to defend himself. His wise teacher, Miyagi, teaches him not only how to fight, but how to be powerful and strong mentally, too. Eventually, Daniel gets stronger and defeats his bullies at the karate tournament. The movie teaches kids not to run away from problems, but to face them.

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The Craft (1996)

If you have an older teen who’s into rock music and dark things, The Craft can be a great way to start a bullying conversation. It’s about a girl who enters a new school and befriends three girls involved in occult things. They three are being bullied for different reasons and after the new girl gets hurt, too, they all get together, cast a spell and acquire witch powers.

They decide to get revenge and hurt the ones who have been hurting them. It all goes the wrong way leading girls to much different results than they expected. The movie can teach your teens that revenge is not the way to get things done and it only makes you the same as your offenders.

Bullying is among the most urgent problems in schools all over the world. Many kids have to deal with it on a regular basis and many then suffer from major psychological issues. Parents have to pay a lot of attention to teaching their kids about the wrong of bullying. And these movies can be a great way to start.

Featured photo credit: Girls with popcorn/Flickr via flickr.com

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Published on November 7, 2018

How to Homeschool in the 21st Century (For All Types of Parents & Kids)

How to Homeschool in the 21st Century (For All Types of Parents & Kids)

In 2016, it was estimated that 1.7 million children were being homeschooled in the U.S, roughly 3.3% of all school-aged children.[1] Although this may not sound like a big portion of the population, the growth rate of homeschooling has been 7 to15% per year for the last two decades.

The burgeoning numbers are not a coincidence. There are tremendous benefits to homeschooling, including one-on-one teaching, adaptability to individual needs and learning styles, a safe learning environment, encouraging learning for knowledge rather than grades, and tailoring a curriculum to the child’s interests.

Is homeschooling something that you have been considering for your family? With all of the tools and resources available for homeschoolers in the 21st century, it may be easier than you think.

How to Homeschool (Getting Started)

After thinking it through, you’ve decided that homeschooling is the right step for you and your family. Now what? Here are the first things you should do to get your homeschooling journey started on the right track.

Figure Out the Laws

Homeschooling is regulated by the state, not the federal government. The first step is to find the current and accurate legal requirements mandated by your state in order to educate your child legally.[2]

The regulations can vary widely, from strict guidelines to no guidelines at all. However, don’t be overwhelmed by the legal jargon. There are many resources and local communities for homeschooling families that can help you figure out the logistics.

Decide on an Approach

Every child’s needs are different. This is your chance to choose the homeschooling style or combination of styles that best fits your child’s learning style and interests. A brief description of seven different homeschooling methods are listed below.

Supplies/Resources

Often times, purchasing a homeschooling curriculum is done too early in the planning process, resulting in buyer’s remorse.

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A curriculum is not always needed for homeschooling, and other types of free or less structured resources are readily available.

Find a Community

Getting connected with a community of homeschoolers is one of the most important parts of building a successful and thriving homeschool environment for your kids.

Look for communities online for virtual support or a local group that you and your kids can interact with. Partnering with others fosters better socialization skills for the students and provides opportunities for field trips, classes, and outings that wouldn’t have otherwise been a part of the homeschooling experience.

7 Different Homeschooling Methods

1. School-At-Home

Also known as Traditional homeschool, School-At-Home uses essentially the same curriculum as the local private or public school but at home.

The lessons can be completed independently, but more commonly, they are administered by a parent or a teacher-facilitated online school.

  • Benefits: formal standards, wide selection of curricula, same pace as peers, short-term friendly
  • Drawbacks: expensive, inflexible, time consuming, parent can get easily burnt out
  • Resources: K12, Time4Learning, Abeka

2. Classical

One of the most popular homeschooling methods used, it borrows educational practices from Ancient Greece and Rome. Subject areas are studied chronologically so that students can understand the consequence of ideas over time.

Socratic dialogue fosters effective discussions and debate to achieve beyond mere comprehension. There is often a strong emphasis on Great Books[3] as well as Greek and Latin.

3. Unit Studies

Rather than breaking up education into subjects, unit studies approach each topic as a whole, studying it from the perspective of each subject area.

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For example, a unit study about animals could include reading books about animals, learning about the classification of animals, figuring out which animals live on which continents, etc. This method is often used as a technique in other more comprehensive educational methodologies.

  • Benefits: promotes thinking about concepts as a whole, not monotonous or redundant, student-directed, bolsters weaker subject areas, beneficial for teaching multi-age students
  • Drawbacks: incomplete, knowledge gaps, curriculum-dependent
  • Resources: Unit Study, Unit Studies, Unit Studies Made Easy, Konos

4. Charlotte Mason

This Christian homeschooling style utilizes shorts periods of study (15-20 minute max for elementary, 45 minute max for high school), along with nature walks and history portfolios.

Students are encouraged to practice observation, memorization, and narration often. With a focus on “living books” (stories with heroes, life lessons, socio-ethical implications), reading plays a big role in this student-paced teaching style.

5. Montessori

Maria Montessori developed this method through working with special needs children in the early 20th century.

With a primary focus on the student setting the pace and indirect instruction from the teacher, this approach includes free movement, large unstructured time blocks (up to 3 hours), multi-grade classes, and individualized learning plans based on interests.

6. Unschooling

Unschooling is a learning model largely based on the work of John Holt.[4] The teaching style focuses mainly on the students’ interests, putting priority on experiential, activity-based, and learn as you go approaches.

For basic skills such as reading, writing, and math, a systematic technique is employed, but testing and evaluations are typically not utilized. Teachers, in general, play more of a facilitator role.

7. Eclectic/Relaxed

As the most popular method of homeschool, eclectic homeschooling is child-directed, resourceful, and non-curriculum based.

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Parents can sample any combination of homeschooling methods and styles or resources. One growing sector of eclectic homeschooling combines part homeschooling with part traditional schooling.

How to Facilitate Homeschooling with Technology

One of the reasons homeschooling is more feasible than ever before is due to the accessibility of tools and resources to enhance the learning process.

Email

Email is a tool that has really stood the test of time. Invented in 1972, it is still used today as a primary means of communicating on the Internet.

It is a great way to share assignments, links, and videos between parent and student.

Google Drive/Calendar

Google Drive offers a multitude of essential programs that can come in handy for homeschoolers, such as Docs, Sheets, Slides, and more.

With its sharing capabilities, easy accessibility, and auto-save ability, it’s easier than ever to organize and complete assignments. It will improve students’ writing and typing skills, as well as eliminate the need for paper.

Google Calendar is an excellent tool for tracking assignment due dates, planning field trips and activities, and developing time management skills.

Ebooks

Rather than invest in physical copies of books, ebooks are a wonderful option for saving money and space. There are plenty of places that offer a free or paid subscription to a wide selection of ebooks:

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E-Courses

When a structured curriculum is necessary for teaching a certain topic, an e-course is the way to go.

From watercolors to calculus, there are e-courses available about almost everything. Including different teaching styles that vary from the parents will encourage students to learn in different ways.

The visual and auditory stimulation will also be beneficial in helping students understand and retain the concepts being taught.

Some recommendations:

Youtube

Youtube is not just a platform for music videos and cats doing funny things. There are a number of Youtube channels that produce quality educational videos, free of charge.

Creating a playlist of videos for various topics is a great way to supplement a homeschool education.

Some recommendations:

Final Thoughts

Homeschooling in the current age looks much different than it did ten years ago. There are more options and more flexibility when it comes to educating kids at home.

Don’t be overwhelmed by the idea of homeschooling your children if it could make a positive impact on your family.

Featured photo credit: Hal Gatewood via unsplash.com

Reference

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