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Sad Signs You’re Getting Old (Mentally)

Sad Signs You’re Getting Old (Mentally)

There’s a new kid at work. He’s probably 10 years your junior; tall, dashing but stern looking. HR’s introducing him to everyone in the office and as they introduce him to you, you’re taken aback and quite appalled to know that he’s your new manager.

With that stinging sense of betrayal from your own company that you have shed blood and sweat for during the past 10 years and only to be let down by seemingly poor judgement by management of hiring younger people to take up senior roles, you finally say, “pfft, i’m not taking instructions from this guy”.

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Sadly, signs like these are proof that you might be getting old. It’s also probably the first sign of a crack which management are trained to look for and maybe that is why “Mr. Fresh Face” has set foot in the office. Harsh but very realistic, here are some signs that you can avoid so that you can stay ahead of your peers and stop becoming old:

1. You Can’t Be Bothered With The Basics Skills Anymore

A good scenario of this could be that you started out as a skilled animator and then have risen to division director after 10 years of hard work. However, being so caught up with managing your team, you have neglected the basic skills that got you where you are in the first place. By neglecting your basic foundations, you lose track of the technology advances now required to get the basic job done. And the last thing a boss would want to face is admitting to their staff, that you have lost track of today’s technology advances.

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2. You Are Paranoid About Everything

When we get older, it is natural to be wary of potential problems as life long experiences have chiselled us into a hardy bunch. But it becomes a problem when it turns into paranoia. For example, when you’re travelling, not being open to new adventures for fear of all the possible bad scenarios that can happen is just a sign that you are not willing to experience new things anymore and definitely one of the signs you’re getting old.

3. You Don’t Listen To Anyone Anymore

By ditching the art of listening, you are entirely missing out on chances to learn new information. By tuning people down, not only do we send a message that we are selfish, we are also lying to ourselves about how much we already know about the world we live in (of which, in fact, we know very little) and thus, we omit the opinions of others.

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4. There Aren’t Anymore Goals to Pursue

At the top of your mind, state a current goal that you are pursuing. If the answer is that there aren’t any, it’s a good sign that you have allowed your mind to degenerate and wither.

Like Steve Jobs had mentioned before, “We are here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here?”

Without a goal or purpose in life at a later age, our minds will turn less sharp, making it harder for us to change our mindset.

5. You Are Unable to Control Your Emotions

Having control over our emotions is the single most important factor of having a healthy social life and in turn a happier life. If we are unable to keep our emotions in check, it’s a sign that we are on a downward spiral to “lonely-ville” where people tend to avoid us due to our inability to acknowledge that our short fuse is keeping everyone at bay.

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By keeping our emotions in check with different methods such as taking a step back and thinking postively, taking a deep breath or even meditating instead of losing our temper quickly, we will avoid going into pointless heated arguments with our loved ones. Just remember, that our emotions can affect the rest who we rely on to have a happy and fulfilling life.

Featured photo credit: Depressed ElderlyIsmael Nieto via unsplash.com

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Lim Kairen

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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