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10 Ways to Secure Your Data When Working Remotely

10 Ways to Secure Your Data When Working Remotely

The freedom to work remotely is one of the many perks of self-employment. But working on the go makes your data more vulnerable to attack than logging online from home or your office. So, what can you do? Help keep your information safe wherever you connect to the web with these 10 security tips.

1. Install tracking software.

Before you work on the road, install tracking software like Prey. In addition to geo-locating your device if it’s lost or stolen, the service can also provide a picture of the person using it — which can help police locate your stolen device. To help prevent access to your data, Prey lets you remotely lock down your device and delete stored passwords. With Prey’s basic plan you can protect up to three devices at no charge.

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2. Create strong passwords.

One of the easiest ways to tighten data security is creating robust passwords and changing them regularly. Use a password generator to create passwords that are hacker-resistant, and avoid using the same password for multiple sites or applications. When possible, set passwords to expire every few months and never allow your device to “remember” them.

3. Use a secure email program.

Securing your email is a critical part of protecting your data when you work remotely, especially if you transmit proprietary or sensitive information. Using an email encryption service like Virtru or Tutanota can be an effective way to protect your communications. Both services offer free basic encryption plans that work with your existing email system.

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4. Migrate data to the Cloud.

Cloud-based storage can help keep your data safe in the event your device is stolen or compromised by a hacker or virus. Plus, using the Cloud allows you to access your data from any device, whenever and wherever you want. Cloud storage services such as OneDrive, Dropbox, and MediaFire offer basic plans at no cost.

5. Turn on your mobile firewall.

A firewall can help fend off many of the security risks presented by public Wi-Fi by blocking unauthorized access to your device — but only if it’s turned on. Before you use a public Wi-Fi network, ensure your mobile firewall is on and operating.

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6. Install updates.

When you receive software update notifications, don’t dismiss them. Software patches and browser updates are usually free, take only a few minutes to install, and could save you from a cyber attack. For the best protection, install updates immediately or at least within one week of receiving a notification. Be careful that you are only allowing updates and installations from trusted sources.

7. Use a virtual private network (VPN).

A VPN is an effective way to help keep your data secure when connecting to the web via public Wi-Fi. VPNs provide a secure tunnel through which information passing in and out of your laptop, tablet, smartphone, or other device can travel. To maintain data security, it’s especially important to use a VPN if you connect to corporate file servers or applications from a remote location. VPNBook and SpotFlux are two VPN services that offer complimentary basic plans.

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8. Get online only when you need to.

It’s convenient stay connected to public Wi-Fi even when you’re not actively using it, but doing so increases your exposure to everything from malware and worms to cyber criminals. When you don’t need Wi-Fi, log off the network.

9. Use a hotspot.

In lieu of public Wi-Fi, consider using a mobile hotspot or your smartphone’s personal hotspot. Although no means of getting online is 100 percent secure, hotspots protected by robust passwords may provide better protection than public wireless Internet.

10. Be sure you’re connected to the right Wi-Fi.

Before logging on to a public network, double check the name of the Wi-Fi connection for accuracy. Hackers will often create similarly named networks to fool users, and then collect passwords and other sensitive data.

Take these precautions to secure your data, and make working remotely as safe as it is rewarding.

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Last Updated on November 5, 2019

5 Best Language Learning Apps to Master a New Language

5 Best Language Learning Apps to Master a New Language

Learning a new language is no easy feat. While a language instructor is irreplaceable, language learning apps have come to revolutionize a lot of things and it has made language learning much easier. Compared to language learning websites, apps offer a more interactive experience to learn a new language.

The following language learning apps are the top recommended apps for your language learning needs:

1. Duolingo

    Duolingo is a very successful app that merged gamification and language learning. According to Expanded Ramblings, the app now counts with 300 million users.

    Duolingo offers a unique concept, an easy-to-use app and is a great app to accompany your language acquisition journey. The courses are created by native speakers, so this is not data or algorithm-based.

    The app is free and has the upgrade options with Duolingo Plus for $9.99, which are add free lessons. The mobile app offers 25 languages and is popular for English-speaking learners learning other languages.

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    Download the app

    2. HelloTalk

      HelloTalk aims to facilitate speaking practice and eliminate the stresses of a real-time and life conversation. The app allows users to connect to native speakers and has a WhatsApp like chat that imitates its interface.

      There is a perk to this app. The same native speakers available also want to make an even exchange and learn your target language, so engagement is the name of the game.

      What’s more, the app has integrated translation function that bypasses the difficulties of sending a message with a missing word and instead fills in the gap.

      Download the app

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      3. Mindsnacks

        Remember that Duolingo has integrated gamification in language learning? Well, Mindsnacks takes the concept to another level. There is an extensive list of languages available within the app comes with eight to nine games designed to learn grammar, vocabulary listening.

        You will also be able to visualize your progress since the app integrates monitoring capabilities. The layout and interface is nothing short of enjoyable, cheerful and charming.

        Download the app

        4. Busuu

          Bussu is a social language learning app. It is available on the web, Android, and iOS. It currently supports 12 languages and is free.

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          The functionality allows users to learn words, simple dialogues and questions related to the conversations. In addition, the dialogues are recorded by native speakers, which brings you close to the language learning experience.

          When you upgrade, you unlock important features including course materials. The subscription is $17 a month.

          Download the app

          5. Babbel

            Babbel is a subscription-based service founded in 2008. According to LinguaLift, it is a paid cousing of Duolingo. The free version comes with 40 classes, and does not require you to invest any money.

            Each of the classes starts with with a sequential teaching of vocabulary with the help of pictures. The courses are tailor made and adapted to the students’ level, allowing the learning to be adjusted accordingly.

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            If you started learning a language and stopped, Babbel will help you pick up where you started.

            Download the app

            Takeaways

            All the apps recommended are tailored for different needs, whether you’re beginning to learn a language or trying to pick back up one. All of them are designed by real-life native speakers and so provide you with a more concrete learning experience.

            Since these apps are designed to adapt to different kinds of learning styles, do check out which one is the most suitable for you.

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            Featured photo credit: Yura Fresh via unsplash.com

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