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5 Of The Toughest Sports To Take Up In Your 30s

5 Of The Toughest Sports To Take Up In Your 30s

So you have looked at yourself in the mirror now that you are approaching something like middle age, and came to the conclusion that it is time to get in shape and start exercising again. That is good, and you can improve your body by jogging and playing some golf.

But you can do more. Maybe you can do something that provides a real challenge. You are not going to strap on a football helmet or dunk a basketball, but there are plenty of physical activities you can do that will give you a serious challenge and thrill. Here are five sports which can be fun, challenging, and get your body going.

Boxing

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    Boxing is generally a young man’s sport, because really only young men are stupid enough to think that getting punched in the face repeatedly is a good idea.

    But if you are looking to get fit, you do not have to actually punch anyone (or more importantly, get punched). There is a great deal of cardiovascular training which comes with preparing for boxing, whether it is jumping rope, wailing away on a punching bag, or practicing your reflexes and balance.

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    Many fitness centers offer boxing classes, and will understand if you come in only looking to get fit. They will give you a chance to practice without risking yourself in a serious match.

    It should be noted that you should get into reasonably decent health before you try boxing. But once you do, it is a great way to improve your health.

    Climbing

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      Climbing is a sport which you can keep at your entire life, and there are many accounts of senior climbers succeeding. Just look at this 95-year old Connecticut climber, who set a record at her local park for her exploits.

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      Climbing offers a lot of challenges, but an older person does have some advantages compared to someone younger. An older person can step back, think, and calmly take the climb slowly and thoughtfully compared to someone with more energy. And you will have more time to learn the tricks and techniques needed to become a successful climber. You will also improve your muscles and heart strength as well as your grip.

      Swimming

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        Almost any guide to exercise will tell you how swimming is a great way to improve your health without risking injury. This is because there is no jumping, the water supports your weight, and it does not impact your joints all that much.

        But as someone who has swam for most of his life, I can tell you there is a catch to it. Yes, swimming does not impact your joints and muscles as much as say, running. But because of this, it means that you can practice longer and harder than land sports where you have to stop and rest.

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        So while swimming has a reputation as an easy sport for those who are just exercising to stay fit, you can put a lot more effort into swimming compared to other sports. And that effort can translate into some fantastic health results.

        Tennis

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          Tennis can seem to be easy if you are watching the Wimbledon on TV, but it is a sport which can require jumping and short bursts of energy. So it may not seem to be suitable for an older person.

          But you do not have to be the next Roger Federer. The constant running, walking, and hitting the ball all are part of tennis and can go a long way towards improving your total body health. And tennis is a sport which you can learn and continue to play at any point in your life, as Gerald Marzorati with the New York Times details.

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          Rowing

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            Swimming can be hard. Boxing can be hard. Tennis can be hard. But generally when you’re finished with them, you can walk out, take a shower, and not be totally catatonic afterwards.

            That cannot be said for rowing, one of the most challenging sports there is. Rowing seems easy for anyone who has ever watched a rowing race during the Olympics. But it taxes all of your muscles, even your legs (in fact, the legs are the key muscle in rowing as opposed to the arms). It also requires proper technique, a lot of practice, and will leave you absolutely sore when you are finished.

            Rowing is an incredible challenge, but also gives you an incredible workout when you have finished. If you want a true, incredible challenge not for the weak hearted, then find that rowing machine at the gym or a local rowing crew and then get to work.

            Featured photo credit: coffeebugg via flickr.com

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            Last Updated on March 13, 2019

            How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

            How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

            Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

            You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

            Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

            1. Work on the small tasks.

            When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

            Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

            2. Take a break from your work desk.

            Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

            Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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            3. Upgrade yourself

            Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

            The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

            4. Talk to a friend.

            Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

            Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

            5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

            If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

            Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

            Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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            6. Paint a vision to work towards.

            If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

            Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

            Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

            7. Read a book (or blog).

            The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

            Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

            Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

            8. Have a quick nap.

            If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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            9. Remember why you are doing this.

            Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

            What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

            10. Find some competition.

            Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

            Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

            11. Go exercise.

            Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

            Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

            As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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            Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

            12. Take a good break.

            Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

            Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

            Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

            Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

            More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

            Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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