Advertising
Advertising

How to Prepare For College Final Exams Using the Internet

How to Prepare For College Final Exams Using the Internet

It’s no surprise that the Internet has had a profound impact on the way we study and prepare for exams. Rather than spending hours in a library looking for relevant content, we can just fire up Google to find anything we want.

But the Internet isn’t just a great resource for information; it also has a huge selection of websites specifically designed to help you prepare for exams. You can get everything from study guides and flash cards to videos and blogs that will help you prepare. And some websites even feature free practice tests. Here are 12 websites that can help you prepare for your college final exams.

1. Rescue Me

1.

    How much time do you think you spend wandering around Facebook, Twitter, and other time-sucking social media websites? If you think it’s cutting into your study time, you can download Rescue Me. It will run in the background of your computer and keep track of where you spend your time so you can get a handle on it. If you find that you’re wasting way too much time, Rescue Me can temporarily block all of those websites.

    2. Duolingo

    2.

      Duolingo is a free app that lets you learn a new language (almost) effortlessly. If you have a final in a foreign language, you can use Duolingo to brush up on your language skills while waiting for a bus, standing on line at the store, or as an official study session. And if you’re not taking a language final, it can be a fun way to keep your brain engaged while still taking a break from actual studying.

      Advertising

      3. Booktrack

      4

        Do you have to read a novel as part of your study plan? Booktrack will give that novel a soundtrack! Reading has never been so exciting!

        4. Study Blue

        5

          Study Blue is the largest online library of flashcards, notes, and study guides for almost any topic you can imagine. You can use the existing tools or create your own to add to the database.

          5. Trello

          7.

            Professional businesses rely on Trello to manage their schedules, documents, team members, and strategies. It only makes sense that you could use the app to manage your finals calendar and all of the relevant study materials, documents, and deadlines.

            Advertising

            6. Study Buddy

            8.

              If you find that your study time is disjointed, poorly organized, and all consuming, then study buddy might provide a better way to manage your time and resources. Study Buddy lets you set alarms on your study time and reminds you when you should take a break. You can also use the app to track how much time you spend studying and how much you spend on other time-draining apps (like Facebook and Twitter).

              7. 4tests

              9.

                4tests is a free website that provides access to practice exams. You can take a practice GED, TOEFL, SAT, or ACT among others.

                8. FetchNotes

                10.

                  FetchNotes is a genius way to store and organize your notes for easier studying. As you go through the semester, add notes to FetchNotes, and label them with a hashtag. Then, you can study one set of hashtagged notes at a time. It’s a brilliant way to take and store notes on the go.

                  Advertising

                  9. Study.com

                  12.

                    You’ll have to register as a member, but once you sign up, you’ll have unlimited access to a huge selection of videos on various subjects to help you study. The videos are all submitted by professionals in the field and teachers.

                    10. Cam Scanner

                    13

                      You probably have to take notes on paper. But you don’t have to keep all that paper with you to study. Scan it into your phone with Cam Scanner so you can easily study on the go.

                      11. Get Revising

                      14.

                        Get Revising provides over 183,000 resources (tests, study guides, flashcards, etc.) collected by other students and teachers. Search for the topic you want to study, and then get to browsing.

                        Advertising

                        12. Unstuck

                        15

                          Unstuck is a digital coach that can help you get “unstuck” when you’re experiencing writer’s block or suffering from a general lack of motivation. The app asks you a series of questions to learn why you are stuck and then offers advice to help you move forward.

                          The Internet is an invaluable resource. It can completely change the way you study and prepare for final exams. But it won’t magically provide you with the roadmap to success. You’ll need to use the right tools for you, and you’ll have to put in the time. With these 12 tools, you’ll be able to have more focused study time so you can be as prepared as possible for that final test.

                          Featured photo credit: VIKTOR HANACEK/PicJumbo via picjumbo.com

                          More by this author

                          Jessica Millis

                          An experienced writer, editor and educator who shares about tips on effective learning.

                          10 Effective Ways To Make You a Fast Learner universities in europe 25 Best Universities in Europe You’ll Be Interested in Studying In How to Prepare For College Final Exams Using the Internet 20 Not-So-Popular Websites Students Should Visit to Make Studying Easier An Incredibly Helpful List of 71 Free Online Courses and Tutorials

                          Trending in Productivity

                          1 How to Increase Willpower and Be Mentally Tough 2 How to Influence People and Make Them Feel Good 3 How to Be a Good Leader and Lead Effectively in Any Situation 4 Does the Pomodoro Technique Work for Your Productivity? 5 A Stress-Free Way To Prioritizing Tasks And Ending Busyness

                          Read Next

                          Advertising
                          Advertising
                          Advertising

                          Last Updated on March 23, 2021

                          Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                          Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                          One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

                          The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

                          You need more than time management. You need energy management

                          1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

                          How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

                          Advertising

                          I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

                          I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

                          2. Determine your “peak hours”

                          Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

                          Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

                          Advertising

                          My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

                          In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

                          Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

                          3. Block those high-energy hours

                          Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

                          Advertising

                          Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

                          If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

                          That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

                          There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

                          Advertising

                          Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

                          Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

                          Read Next