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5 Foreign Languages That Will Make You The Most Money

5 Foreign Languages That Will Make You The Most Money
Deciding to learn a new language is one thing. Deciding which of the most useful languages to learn is another. This is the question we’re going to address today.

We’ve talked about the amazing benefits of learning a language, such as clearing our mind to improve our decision-making skills.

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    But did you know that learning another language can also help you make more money?

    You’ve probably heard the popular saying by Warren Buffet, “the more you learn, the more you earn.” It turns out this rule applies more than ever for learning a new language.

    Even with the addition of over 295,000 jobs in the United States, there are millions of people struggling to find full-time work — or any work at all. The good news is that learning a language has been shown to not only increase your chances of finding amazing work opportunities, but it’s also been shown to increase your earnings.

    CareerBuilder.com’s hiring forecast showed that 39 percent of U.S. employers said they plan to hire bilingual candidates, and half said that if they had two equally qualified candidates, they would be more inclined to hire the bilingual one.

    Make more money

    Learning a language has been shown to add between 10–15% to your wage, according to language specialist recruitment agency Euro London.

    This shows that learning a language is a wise investment for anyone, at any age, whether you’re preparing to enter the workforce or looking to expand your opportunities.

    Assuming an average salary of around $45,000, a 2% “language bonus” average over 40 years, and also a 1% raise annually, you’d have an extra $67,000 by the time you retire. Since you can learn a new language quickly with the right solution, that’s a pretty good investment of your time.

    What’s more, salary bonuses vary depending on the exact language in which you’re proficient. Here’s a quick breakdown of a few different secondary languages and their annual bonuses as reported by The Economist:

    • Spanish — 1.5 percent bonus
    • French — 2.3 percent bonus
    • German — 3.8 percent bonus
     
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      This means that you can make an additional $50,000 to $125,000 just for knowing how to speak a foreign language!

      Expand your career opportunities

      More importantly, with the rise of globalization, there’s an exponential demand for jobs that require a foreign language.

      Interpreters and translators are among the top five fastest-growing occupations, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, with opportunities expected to increase by 46% between 2012 and 2022. For example, members of the U.S. military can earn up to $1,000 more per month if they are proficient in multiple languages.

      You can open your doors to new career opportunities, such becoming a Brand Specialist for Google or a Game Translator for Nintendo, where you’ll be paid to translate video games!

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        5 of the most useful languages to learn

        Let’s dig into the 5 most useful languages to learn if you want to make more money and improve your career.

        1. German

        As we shared in the graph above, German is known to be the best language that will earn you the big bucks, earning you over 125,000 (Euros) in bonuses!

        This may come as a surprise to many people, because one would assume a language like Mandarin, Japanese, or Spanish, with a higher GDP (by language) will correlate to higher earnings. While this is true for most cases, German is a special case, as Germany is one of the three European powerhouses. This means that the language will be more economically valuable for an outsider than the language of a relatively more closed economy.

          
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          2. French

          With over 200 million people on 5 different continents around the world speaking French, you can see why it ranks as one of the most useful languages to learn.

          At first glance, French may appear to be spoken by only those living in France, but it happens to be the second-most widely learned language after English. Knowing how to speak French opens the doors to French companies in not only France, but other French-speaking parts of the world such as Canada, Switzerland, Belgium, and North and sub-Saharan Africa. As the world’s fifth-biggest economy and number three destination for foreign investment, France is a key economic partner.

          For students looking to pursue their Masters or MBA degrees, knowing French can act as a big advantage. Renowned French universities and business schools are ranked as some of the top higher education institutions in Europe and the world. Students who can speak French are eligible for additional scholarship opportunities, which can save you tens of thousands of dollars.

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            3. Spanish

            Over the past decade, knowing how to speak Spanish has not only been an advantage for job seekers, but it’s become a necessity. In the United States and Europe, Spanish is the foreign language of choice after English.

            population

              No matter what industry you are in, the numbers alone present a strong case to learn Spanish, especially in business. In addition to the sheer number of people you can reach by knowing how to speak Spanish, countries like Mexico, Chile, and Colombia are quickly becoming powerhouses in the global economy.

              Here’s the cherry on top of the sundae: Spanish is the easiest language out of the most useful languages to learn if you already speak English. You can quickly learn Spanish by taking advantage of online solutions like Rype, where you’ll receive unlimited private Spanish lessons and get to work with a dedicated language coach online.

              4. Mandarin

              It’s no secret that China is the world’s new dominant economy, with a growing influence from Africa to the Americas. If you’re in business, then China is a goldmine of opportunities, with over a billion people that you can target.

              According to London-based search firm Ascentator, demand for executive positions by American and multinational companies in China has risen 35% from the previous years, echoing similar figures from other recruiting firms.

              However, unlike Spanish, Mandarin is a complicated language to learn.

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                The good news is that f you can manage to learn Mandarin, you can bet that your future boss and co-workers will be impressed.

                5. Arabic

                The Arab world is recognized as one of the wealthiest regions in the world, with over $600 billion in GDP. The size of the Middle Eastern economy alone increased by approximately 120% in the five-year period from mid-2003 to mid-2008.

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                  Due to the abundance of market opportunities in the Middle East, Western Arabic speakers are in very high demand but in very low supply. Those who speak Arabic have the opportunity to develop an international career in a variety of industries such as education, finance, journalism, foreign services, and more.

                  More by this author

                  Sean Kim

                  Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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                  Last Updated on August 6, 2020

                  6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

                  6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

                  We’ve all done it. That moment when a series of words slithers from your mouth and the instant regret manifests through blushing and profuse apologies. If you could just think before you speak! It doesn’t have to be like this, and with a bit of practice, it’s actually quite easy to prevent.

                  “Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” – Napolean Hill

                  Are we speaking the same language?

                  My mum recently left me a note thanking me for looking after her dog. She’d signed it with “LOL.” In my world, this means “laugh out loud,” and in her world it means “lots of love.” My kids tell me things are “sick” when they’re good, and ”manck” when they’re bad (when I say “bad,” I don’t mean good!). It’s amazing that we manage to communicate at all.

                  When speaking, we tend to color our language with words and phrases that have become personal to us, things we’ve picked up from our friends, families and even memes from the internet. These colloquialisms become normal, and we expect the listener (or reader) to understand “what we mean.” If you really want the listener to understand your meaning, try to use words and phrases that they might use.

                  Am I being lazy?

                  When you’ve been in a relationship for a while, a strange metamorphosis takes place. People tend to become lazier in the way that they communicate with each other, with less thought for the feelings of their partner. There’s no malice intended; we just reach a “comfort zone” and know that our partners “know what we mean.”

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                  Here’s an exchange from Psychology Today to demonstrate what I mean:

                  Early in the relationship:

                  “Honey, I don’t want you to take this wrong, but I’m noticing that your hair is getting a little thin on top. I know guys are sensitive about losing their hair, but I don’t want someone else to embarrass you without your expecting it.”

                  When the relationship is established:

                  “Did you know that you’re losing a lot of hair on the back of your head? You’re combing it funny and it doesn’t help. Wear a baseball cap or something if you feel weird about it. Lots of guys get thin on top. It’s no big deal.”

                  It’s pretty clear which of these statements is more empathetic and more likely to be received well. Recognizing when we do this can be tricky, but with a little practice it becomes easy.

                  Have I actually got anything to say?

                  When I was a kid, my gran used to say to me that if I didn’t have anything good to say, I shouldn’t say anything at all. My gran couldn’t stand gossip, so this makes total sense, but you can take this statement a little further and modify it: “If you don’t have anything to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

                  A lot of the time, people speak to fill “uncomfortable silences,” or because they believe that saying something, anything, is better than staying quiet. It can even be a cause of anxiety for some people.

                  When somebody else is speaking, listen. Don’t wait to speak. Listen. Actually hear what that person is saying, think about it, and respond if necessary.

                  Am I painting an accurate picture?

                  One of the most common forms of miscommunication is the lack of a “referential index,” a type of generalization that fails to refer to specific nouns. As an example, look at these two simple phrases: “Can you pass me that?” and “Pass me that thing over there!”. How often have you said something similar?

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                  How is the listener supposed to know what you mean? The person that you’re talking to will start to fill in the gaps with something that may very well be completely different to what you mean. You’re thinking “pass me the salt,” but you get passed the pepper. This can be infuriating for the listener, and more importantly, can create a lack of understanding and ultimately produce conflict.

                  Before you speak, try to label people, places and objects in a way that it is easy for any listeners to understand.

                  What words am I using?

                  It’s well known that our use of nouns and verbs (or lack of them) gives an insight into where we grew up, our education, our thoughts and our feelings.

                  Less well known is that the use of pronouns offers a critical insight into how we emotionally code our sentences. James Pennebaker’s research in the 1990’s concluded that function words are important keys to someone’s psychological state and reveal much more than content words do.

                  Starting a sentence with “I think…” demonstrates self-focus rather than empathy with the speaker, whereas asking the speaker to elaborate or quantify what they’re saying clearly shows that you’re listening and have respect even if you disagree.

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                  Is the map really the territory?

                  Before speaking, we sometimes construct a scenario that makes us act in a way that isn’t necessarily reflective of the actual situation.

                  A while ago, John promised to help me out in a big way with a project that I was working on. After an initial meeting and some big promises, we put together a plan and set off on its execution. A week or so went by, and I tried to get a hold of John to see how things were going. After voice mails and emails with no reply and general silence, I tried again a week later and still got no response.

                  I was frustrated and started to get more than a bit vexed. The project obviously meant more to me than it did to him, and I started to construct all manner of crazy scenarios. I finally got through to John and immediately started a mild rant about making promises you can’t keep. He stopped me in my tracks with the news that his brother had died. If I’d have just thought before I spoke…

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