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Why Starting A Blog Could Change Your Life

Why Starting A Blog Could Change Your Life

I started blogging regularly six months ago and it has truly changed my life for the better. My social calendar is full, I feel like I have a real place in the blogging community, and most importantly, I’m having fun. If you’re thinking about starting a blog but are not sure, here’s why starting a blog could change your life.

1. You’ll make new friends

It gets harder to make meaningful friendships as we grow older and we no longer have the consistency of a school environment to grow relationships. Luckily, the blogging community is full of lovely people ready to welcome you into their group. Once you start blogging, you already have a hobby in common with hundreds of others; and by visiting other blogs you can find people who share your secret love for existential literature or dancing around in your underwear to Beyonce (although that last one is all of us, ammiright?).

Most of the bloggers I have met, whether in person or online, have been really nice people and the community is very welcoming as a whole.

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2. You’ll learn things about yourself

Before I started blogging, I had no idea that I could truly engage people through my writing. I didn’t know that there were plenty of other young women out there who felt as lost as I did, or that there were so many of us who wanted to peek into each others’ make up bags and talk about how hard it is to get a job you love these days.

Your confidence will grow, and you’ll have the chance to do things you never thought you could, whether that be write about a personal subject, attend blogging events or to interview someone you look up to.

3. It’s a great hobby

Before I started blogging, I was always thinking about needing a hobby. I wanted to do something creative in my spare time that could become my ‘thing’. I bought a painting set but never got round to opening it; I signed up for guitar lessons but then I missed the bus and never went again. It wasn’t going very well.

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Then I found blogging. Blogging is such an exciting hobby to have; it can be done from home, it’s free and you can be as creative as you like. You can also blog about anything you like, whether that’s movies, beauty reviews, mental health or your family.

You can start out blogging for free on sites such as WordPress or Blogger, or you can pay for your own domain name and have your very own dot com. Those who are particularly creative can play around with theme designs and headers; and social media savvy bloggers can have fun building their brand online.

4. You’ll become a better writer

The key to getting better at something is practice, and blogging enables you to practice your written communication skills. You’ll get better naturally as time goes on, and you’ll find your voice.

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5. You could make money

Now, if you are going into blogging purely to make money then blogging is not for you. There are opportunities to make money from blogging, but it should not be your biggest priority. Making money from your hobby is a nice added bonus though.

6. It could even land you a new career

Not only is blogging a great hobby, but many bloggers have made a career out of it and now blog full time. This is not easy, though, and many bloggers who do it for a living have to supplement their income in other ways.

If you don’t fancy blogging full time, your blog could still land you a new career whether it’s in copywriting, social media, SEO, fashion or working in beauty. Your blog is a public medium for you to showcase your skills, and as you learn, you’ll gain new skills that could land you the job of your dreams. Many bidding journalists studying at university choose to blog in their spare time, gaining experience and getting their name out there; giving them an advantage when it comes to applying for their first, ever so competitive, entry-level role.

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I recently wrote an article on how blogging can help you get a job in marketing and PR at A Literary Cocktail.

Blogging is an ever-growing industry and as print media diminishes, blogging will only become more popular. What are you waiting for? Sign up, start writing and change your life!

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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