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15 Houseplants That Clean The Air And Are Almost Impossible To Kill

15 Houseplants That Clean The Air And Are Almost Impossible To Kill

Back in elementary school most of us learned that plants help clean the air through a process called photosynthesis. Which is fanastic when we think of all the pollution outside, but believe it or not, the air inside of our homes is actually polluted, too.Toxic chemicals from cleaning supplies, bacteria, mold, mildew and outdoor pollution that makes its way in – it all gets trapped inside our homes.

The good news is we can use houseplants to help clean the air in our homes. And if you’re sitting there thinking about how you’ll just end up killing it, no worries, because these houseplants are nearly impossible to kill!

1. Spider Plant

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    via Flickr

    Spider plants are the perfect houseplants for beginners because they’re super easy to grow. They need bright, indirect sunlight and water every few days, so if you forget to water them they’ll be fine for a while. And before you know it, your spider plant will send out shoots that eventually grow baby spider plants that you can propagate yourself.

    2. Aloe Vera

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      via Flickr

      Aloe vera is an amazing plant that people often use for burns on their skin, but it’s also good at removing formaldehyde from the air. These desert plants need well-drained soil with very light waterings and full sun.

      3. Areca Palm

      5161154709_0db2c6570a_b

        via Flickr

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        This leafy plant is one of the best air purifiers around, especially as it grows bigger. It needs well-drained soil, very little water and only partial sunlight.

        4. Baby Rubber Plant

        7170020567_b10797be9f_k

          via Flickr

          Rubber plants can get quite tall, but do an amazing job at emitting high oxygen content and removing chemicals from the air. It needs filtered light, infrequent watering and rich soil to flourish.

          5. Bamboo Palm

          12940440745_707dfa7cbe_k

            via Flickr

            The tall, narrow trunks of this little tree not only removes formaldehyde, but is also a natural humidifier, making it perfect for dry rooms. To help this guy grow keep it in bright, indirect light and with moist soil.

            6. Garden Mum

            21931569802_45cd20753d_k

              via Flickr

              These bright fall flowers are amazing at removing a ton of pollutants from the air including ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and xylene. Although they’re a popular outdoor plant come autumn they also make great houseplants. Mums only need partial sun, but lots of water.

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              7. Ficus

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                via Flickr

                If you like tall houseplants, ficus can grow anywhere between 2-10 feet tall, depending on the size of the pot you put it in. It’s also a great overall air purifier. To keep this plant thriving make sure to place it in indirect sunlight and water it occasionally.

                8. Peace Lily

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                  via Flickr

                  These gorgeous flowers are tougher than they look and are almost impossible to kill. Since they remove a variety of household cleaner chemicals, along with mold spores, they’re the perfect houseplant for bathrooms, kitchens and laundry rooms. Give it lots of water and bright, indirect sunlight to keep it happy.

                  9. Boston Fern

                  254331853_5c98a206b5_b

                    via Flickr

                    Another plant that will do well in the bathroom, the Boston fern needs to be in a cool room with high humidity and indirect light. It’s also one of the best air purifiers.

                    10. Snake Plant

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                    15704081299_cb417ae0ed_k

                      via Flickr

                      Also known as mother-in-law’s tongue, this plant is nearly impossible to kill yet will do an excellent job at purifying the air in your home! It’s super low maintenance because it doesn’t need much light or water, which makes this sturdy plant perfect for those forgetful gardeners.

                      11. Chinese Evergreen

                      2234104837_100169e792_b

                        via Flickr

                        Chinese Evergreen removes a variety of chemicals from the air, and emits high oxygen content. You can keep it in full shade, but make sure to plant it in a well-draining pot.

                        12. English Ivy

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                          via Flickr

                          If you, or any of your family members, have asthma or allergies, English ivy is fantastic at removing chemicals that can irritate those conditions. English ivy looks amazing when it hangs over the pot, so make sure to place it somewhere it can grow.

                          13. Gerbera Daisy

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                            via Flickr

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                            These large, pretty flowers do an amazing job at not only removing cancer-causing chemicals, but give off oxygen overnight which can help improve your sleep. Make sure to place it somewhere it can get bright light.

                            14. Goldon Pothos

                            111551643_2371f6e57f_b

                              via Flickr

                              The large leaves on goldon pothos are beautiful and do a great job at removing carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. This plant needs to be kept somewhere cool with partial sun, and doesn’t need very much water.

                              15. Moth Orchid

                              8709818990_4f172d184e_k

                                via Flickr

                                Orchids are considered one of the most beautiful flowers by many. They are perfect for removing volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde from paints, solvents and other synthetic materials. These flowering plants need high humidity, lots of light and thorough watering, but only after the soil has completely dried out.

                                Featured photo credit: F.D. Richards via flickr.com

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                                Last Updated on January 21, 2020

                                The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                                The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                                Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

                                your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

                                  Why You Need a Vision

                                  Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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                                  How to Create Your Life Vision

                                  Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

                                  What Do You Want?

                                  The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

                                  It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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                                  Some tips to guide you:

                                  • Remember to ask why you want certain things
                                  • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
                                  • Give yourself permission to dream.
                                  • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
                                  • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

                                  Some questions to start your exploration:

                                  • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
                                  • What would you like to have more of in your life?
                                  • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
                                  • What are your secret passions and dreams?
                                  • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
                                  • What do you want your relationships to be like?
                                  • What qualities would you like to develop?
                                  • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
                                  • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
                                  • What would you most like to accomplish?
                                  • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

                                  It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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                                  What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

                                  Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

                                  A few prompts to get you started:

                                  • What will you have accomplished already?
                                  • How will you feel about yourself?
                                  • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
                                  • What does your ideal day look like?
                                  • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
                                  • What would you be doing?
                                  • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
                                  • How are you dressed?
                                  • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
                                  • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
                                  • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

                                  It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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                                  Plan Backwards

                                  It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

                                  • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
                                  • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
                                  • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
                                  • What important actions would you have had to take?
                                  • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
                                  • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
                                  • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
                                  • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
                                  • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

                                  Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

                                  It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

                                  Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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