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15 Houseplants That Clean The Air And Are Almost Impossible To Kill

15 Houseplants That Clean The Air And Are Almost Impossible To Kill

Back in elementary school most of us learned that plants help clean the air through a process called photosynthesis. Which is fanastic when we think of all the pollution outside, but believe it or not, the air inside of our homes is actually polluted, too.Toxic chemicals from cleaning supplies, bacteria, mold, mildew and outdoor pollution that makes its way in – it all gets trapped inside our homes.

The good news is we can use houseplants to help clean the air in our homes. And if you’re sitting there thinking about how you’ll just end up killing it, no worries, because these houseplants are nearly impossible to kill!

1. Spider Plant

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    via Flickr

    Spider plants are the perfect houseplants for beginners because they’re super easy to grow. They need bright, indirect sunlight and water every few days, so if you forget to water them they’ll be fine for a while. And before you know it, your spider plant will send out shoots that eventually grow baby spider plants that you can propagate yourself.

    2. Aloe Vera

    386868234_022be78a5a_o

      via Flickr

      Aloe vera is an amazing plant that people often use for burns on their skin, but it’s also good at removing formaldehyde from the air. These desert plants need well-drained soil with very light waterings and full sun.

      3. Areca Palm

      5161154709_0db2c6570a_b

        via Flickr

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        This leafy plant is one of the best air purifiers around, especially as it grows bigger. It needs well-drained soil, very little water and only partial sunlight.

        4. Baby Rubber Plant

        7170020567_b10797be9f_k

          via Flickr

          Rubber plants can get quite tall, but do an amazing job at emitting high oxygen content and removing chemicals from the air. It needs filtered light, infrequent watering and rich soil to flourish.

          5. Bamboo Palm

          12940440745_707dfa7cbe_k

            via Flickr

            The tall, narrow trunks of this little tree not only removes formaldehyde, but is also a natural humidifier, making it perfect for dry rooms. To help this guy grow keep it in bright, indirect light and with moist soil.

            6. Garden Mum

            21931569802_45cd20753d_k

              via Flickr

              These bright fall flowers are amazing at removing a ton of pollutants from the air including ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and xylene. Although they’re a popular outdoor plant come autumn they also make great houseplants. Mums only need partial sun, but lots of water.

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              7. Ficus

              93086413_5f6a475301_b

                via Flickr

                If you like tall houseplants, ficus can grow anywhere between 2-10 feet tall, depending on the size of the pot you put it in. It’s also a great overall air purifier. To keep this plant thriving make sure to place it in indirect sunlight and water it occasionally.

                8. Peace Lily

                8589292037_80c058c647_k

                  via Flickr

                  These gorgeous flowers are tougher than they look and are almost impossible to kill. Since they remove a variety of household cleaner chemicals, along with mold spores, they’re the perfect houseplant for bathrooms, kitchens and laundry rooms. Give it lots of water and bright, indirect sunlight to keep it happy.

                  9. Boston Fern

                  254331853_5c98a206b5_b

                    via Flickr

                    Another plant that will do well in the bathroom, the Boston fern needs to be in a cool room with high humidity and indirect light. It’s also one of the best air purifiers.

                    10. Snake Plant

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                    15704081299_cb417ae0ed_k

                      via Flickr

                      Also known as mother-in-law’s tongue, this plant is nearly impossible to kill yet will do an excellent job at purifying the air in your home! It’s super low maintenance because it doesn’t need much light or water, which makes this sturdy plant perfect for those forgetful gardeners.

                      11. Chinese Evergreen

                      2234104837_100169e792_b

                        via Flickr

                        Chinese Evergreen removes a variety of chemicals from the air, and emits high oxygen content. You can keep it in full shade, but make sure to plant it in a well-draining pot.

                        12. English Ivy

                        7609310898_c821e65530_k

                          via Flickr

                          If you, or any of your family members, have asthma or allergies, English ivy is fantastic at removing chemicals that can irritate those conditions. English ivy looks amazing when it hangs over the pot, so make sure to place it somewhere it can grow.

                          13. Gerbera Daisy

                          5825357809_d60f22477c_b

                            via Flickr

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                            These large, pretty flowers do an amazing job at not only removing cancer-causing chemicals, but give off oxygen overnight which can help improve your sleep. Make sure to place it somewhere it can get bright light.

                            14. Goldon Pothos

                            111551643_2371f6e57f_b

                              via Flickr

                              The large leaves on goldon pothos are beautiful and do a great job at removing carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. This plant needs to be kept somewhere cool with partial sun, and doesn’t need very much water.

                              15. Moth Orchid

                              8709818990_4f172d184e_k

                                via Flickr

                                Orchids are considered one of the most beautiful flowers by many. They are perfect for removing volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde from paints, solvents and other synthetic materials. These flowering plants need high humidity, lots of light and thorough watering, but only after the soil has completely dried out.

                                Featured photo credit: F.D. Richards via flickr.com

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                                Last Updated on September 28, 2020

                                The Pros and Cons of Working from Home

                                The Pros and Cons of Working from Home

                                At the start of the year, if you had asked anyone if they could do their work from home, many would have said no. They would have cited the need for team meetings, a place to be able to sit down and get on with their work, the camaraderie of the office, and being able to meet customers and clients face to face.

                                Almost ten months later, most of us have learned that we can do our work from home and in many ways, we have discovered working from home is a lot better than doing our work in a busy, bustling office environment where we are inundated with distractions and noise.

                                One of the things the 2020 pandemic has reminded us is we humans are incredibly adaptable. It is one of the strengths of our kind. Yet we have been unknowingly practicing this for years. When we move house we go through enormous upheaval.

                                When we change jobs, we not only change our work environment but we also change the surrounding people. Humans are adaptable and this adaptability gives us strength.

                                So, what are the pros and cons of working from home? Below I will share some things I have discovered since I made the change to being predominantly a person who works from home.

                                Pro #1: A More Relaxed Start to the Day

                                This one I love. When I had to be at a place of work in the past, I would always set my alarm to give me just enough time to make coffee, take a shower, and change. Mornings always felt like a rush.

                                Now, I can wake up a little later, make coffee and instead of rushing to get out of the door at a specific time, I can spend ten minutes writing in my journal, reviewing my plan for the day, and start the day in a more relaxed frame of mind.

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                                When you start the day in a relaxed state, you begin more positively. You find you have more clarity and more focus and you are not wasting energy worrying about whether you will be late.

                                Pro #2: More Quiet, Focused Time = Increased Productivity

                                One of the biggest difficulties of working in an office is the noise and distractions. If a colleague or boss can see you sat at your desk, you are more approachable. It is easier for them to ask you questions or engage you in meaningless conversations.

                                Working from home allows you to shut the door and get on with an hour or two of quiet focused work. If you close down your Slack and Email, you avoid the risk of being disturbed and it is amazing how much work you can get done.

                                An experiment conducted in 2012 found that working from home increased a person’s productivity by 13%, and more recent studies also find significant increases in productivity.[1]

                                When our productivity increases, the amount of time we need to perform our work decreases, and this means we can spend more time on activities that can bring us closer to our family and friends as well as improve our mental health.

                                Pro #3: More Control Over Your Day

                                Without bosses and colleagues watching over us all day, we have a lot more control over what we do. While some work will inevitably be more urgent than others, we still get a lot more choice about what we work on.

                                We also get more control over where we work. I remember when working in an office, we were given a fixed workstation. Some of these workstations were pleasant with a lot of natural sunlight, but other areas were less pleasant. It was often the luck of the draw whether we find ourselves in a good place to work or not.

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                                By working from home we can choose what work to work on and whether we want to face a window or not. We can get up and move to another place, and we can move from room to room. And if you have a garden, on nice days you could spend a few hours working outside.

                                Pro #4: You Get to Choose Your Office Environment

                                While many companies will provide you with a laptop or other equipment to do your work, others will give you an allowance to purchase your equipment. But with furniture such as your chair and desk, you have a lot of freedom.

                                I have seen a lot of amazing home working spaces with wonderful sets up—better chairs, laptop stands that make working from a laptop much more ergonomic and therefore, better for your neck.

                                You can also choose your wall art and the little nick-nacks on your desk or table. With all this freedom, you can create a very personal and excellent working environment that is a pleasure to work in. When you are happy doing your work, you will inevitably do better work.

                                Con #1: We Move a Lot Less

                                When we commute to a place of work, there is movement involved. Many people commute using public transport, which means walking to the bus stop or train station. Then, there is the movement at lunchtime when we go out to buy our lunch. Working in a place of work requires us to move more.

                                Unfortunately, working from home naturally causes us to move less and this means we are not burning as many calories as we need to.

                                Moving is essential to our health and if you are working from home you need to become much more aware of your movement. To ensure you are moving enough, make sure you take your lunch breaks. Get up from your desk and move. Go outside, if you can, and take a walk. And, of course, refrain from regular trips to the refrigerator.

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                                Con #2: Less Human Interaction

                                One of the nicest things about bringing a group of people together to work is the camaraderie and relationships that are built over time. Working from home takes us away from that human interaction and for many, this can cause a feeling of loss.

                                Humans are a social species—we need to be with other people. Without that connection, we start to feel lonely and that can lead to mental health issues.

                                Zoom and Microsoft Teams meeting cannot replace that interaction. Often, the interactions we get at our workplaces are spontaneous. But with video calls, there is nothing spontaneous—most of these calls are prearranged and that’s not spontaneous.

                                This lack of spontaneous interaction can also reduce a team’s ability to develop creative solutions—there’s just something about a group of incredibly creative people coming together in a room to thrash out ideas together that lends itself to creativity.

                                While video calls can be useful, they don’t match the connection between a group of people working on a solution together.

                                Con #3: The Cost of Buying Home Office Equipment

                                Not all companies are going to provide you with a nice allowance to buy expensive home office equipment. 100% remote companies such as Doist (the creators of Todoist and Twist) provide a $2,000 allowance to all their staff every two years to buy office equipment. Others are not so generous.

                                This can prove to be expensive for many people to create their ideal work-from-home workspace. Many people must make do with what they already have, and that could mean unsuitable chairs that damage backs and necks.

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                                For a future that will likely involve more flexible working arrangements, companies will need to support their staff in ways that will add additional costs to an already reduced bottom line.

                                Con #4: Unique Distractions

                                Not all people have the benefit of being able to afford childcare for young children, and this means they need to balance working and taking care of their kids.

                                For many parents, being able to go to a workplace gives them time away from the noise and demands of a young family, so they could get on with their work. Working from home removes this and can make doing video calls almost impossible.

                                To overcome this, where possible, you need to set some boundaries. I know this is not always possible, but it is something you need to try. You should do whatever you can to make sure you have some boundaries between your work life and home life.

                                Final Thoughts

                                Working from home can be hugely beneficial for many people, but it can also bring serious challenges to others.

                                We are moving towards a new way of working. Therefore, companies need to look at both the pros and cons of working from home and be prepared to support their staff in making this transition. It will not be impossible, but a lot of thought will need to go into it.

                                More About Working From Home

                                Featured photo credit: Standsome Worklifestyle via unsplash.com

                                Reference

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