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9 Empowering TED Talks That Will Zoom You Towards Success

9 Empowering TED Talks That Will Zoom You Towards Success

Want to find out how successful people become successful? Actually, they share common qualities that have allowed them to do well in their particular field.

While the major ingredient for success is following your passion so you can enjoy what you do, there are many other factors that you can work on to emulate the successful.

TED Talks are easy to listen to and feature speakers who are entertaining, experienced in a particular field, and inspiring.

Listen to these 9 empowering TED Talks, take notes, and then start working on these things in your life. Soon, you too, might find yourself listed among the world’s most successful entrepreneurs.

1.You’ll zoom towards success if you know who you are and what you’re passionate about.

Entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk tells how passion led him to starting a new company at the age of 30.

To be successful, he suggests you first need to decide who you are and what your passion is. What do you really want to do with your life? Caring about what you do and doing what you care about are essential for success.

2. You’ll zoom towards success if you know what will motivate you.

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Career analyst, Dan Pink, discusses what motivates people and how necessary it is to understand just what motivates you, if you’re seeking success.

He argues that a new type of motivation – not monetary – is needed. to solve problems in a right-brain, creative way.

Are you intrinsically motivated? Self-motivation is crucial to solving problems in an innovative way. According to Pink, knowing what motivates you is essential for success.

3. You’ll zoom towards success if you make stress your friend.

Health psychologist, Kelly McGonigal, tells about a study that changed how she viewed stress.

Do you believe that stress is bad for your health? McConigal discovered that by changing how you feel about stress, you can change your body’s response in a positive way. When you think positively about stress, you make your stress response healthier.

Find out why the way you think about stress matters, particularly when you convince yourself that “This is my body helping me rise to this challenge.”

4. You’ll zoom towards success if you possess true grit.

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Psychologist Angela Duckworth, a seventh grade teacher, learned from student work and observation that IQ was not the only factor separating her most and least academically gifted students.

What she found as the most important element for success was unexpected. Grit was the surprise element. She discusses why grit is so important and why it is an essential ingredient to build up in yourself if you want to be successful.

5. You’ll zoom towards success if you understand that when you’re happy you work better.

Positive psychologist, Shawn Achor, discusses his view of happiness as it relates to work results. Instead of seeing happiness as something we receive when we reach a goal, he aims to encourage us to start out with happiness.

Do you believe you should work hard to be successful so that you can be happier? Or does positivity in the present produce happiness which then inspires you to become more productive?

Achor suggests techniques that help us rewire the brain so we can change our understanding of being happy. “When we’re happy and positive, our brains work more optimistically and more successfully.”

6. You’ll zoom towards success if you expand your creativity.

Writer and radio producer, Julie Burstein, uses her favorite forms of art to show how to be creative.

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Burstein shares 4 lessons in creativity. She explains that “experience, challenge and limitations are all things we need to embrace for creativity to flourish.”

She vividly illustrates the life cycle that we all live – the cycle of creation and destruction, of control and letting go, of picking up the pieces and making something new.

According to Burstein, creativity allows you to see things in a new way. It is an essential part of being successful in your own area of expertise.

7. You’ll zoom towards success if you deal with procrastination as it arises.

Vik Nithy was founder of 3 companies by the age of 20. In this video, he explains why people procrastinate and how it becomes a battle between two different parts of our brains.

Vik recommends that to overcome procrastination, we need to plan the process by visualizing it. When you see the task in your mind, the brain is convinced that you’ve done it before. This means that visualization can help you eliminate procrastination.

This talk provides a few effective ideas for you to deal with procrastination, in order to expand your productivity and level of success.

8. You’ll zoom towards success if you make videos that go viral.

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YouTube’s Trends Manager, Kevin Allocca, shows various videos and explains exactly why they went viral.

Another string to your success bow could be the creation of your own viral videos. Allocca shares the three key ingredients he has discovered to help you become famous on YouTube.

Watch this video for ways that you can also reach the masses in creative ways, thereby building your success.

9. You’ll zoom towards success if you schedule time off for yourself.

Graphic designer, Stefan Sagmeister talks about the importance of taking time off work for rest and recovery. However, his idea of “time off” is out of the ordinary.

Instead of waiting for retirement so you can relax, he inserts his holidays into his yearly routine, and takes one year off in every seven. While this might not be the type of holiday you’d be planning on taking, his reasons for doing so should motivate you to ar least take “time out” for yourself on a regular basis.

That is his road to success. You might be surprised at the benefits he finds from taking regular “time out”.

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The above TED Talks contain many actionable ideas. I hope you’ve been inspired and motivated to take action on some of them, and move you forward on your success journey.

Featured photo credit: TED talks via ted.com

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Last Updated on June 18, 2019

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Making Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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