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5 Ways To Distinguish Implantation Bleeding or Period

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5 Ways To Distinguish Implantation Bleeding or Period

Whether you’re trying to conceive or trying to prevent pregnancy, it’s important to understand what’s going on “down there” when you see spotting or something heavier than spotting. When an egg is fertilized by a sperm cell, it embeds itself into a woman’s uterine wall. Upon attachment, it is normal to shed a small amount of the uterine lining, which is expelled outward through the woman’s vagina.

Most women aren’t aware that this clue is the first positive, visual sign of pregnancy. So here are five things to check to help you determine whether you’ve gotten your period or if the blood you’re seeing is from implantation bleeding.

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1. Not sure if it is implantation bleeding or period? Check the color.

Women are generally aware that normal period blood is a deep red color. However, when the blood is lighter in color than normal, that’s the first distinguishing sign that you could be pregnant. Implantation bleeding comes in the form of a discharge similar to period blood (because, after all, it is the same type of shedding of the uterine wall as a regular period is), but will look very different in pigment.

2. Check the timing.

Though not fool-proof, the average woman has a twenty-eight day menstrual cycle, with ovulation occurring somewhere around the fourteenth day. She can generally expect to have her period about two weeks following ovulation. However, if pregnancy has occurred, implantation bleeding can be seen one week before regular menstruation.

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3. Check the symptoms.

Typical symptoms of menstruation include: headache or backache, upset stomach, bloating, constipation, or diarrhea, uterine cramping, and mood swings. If bleeding is accompanied by these normal symptoms, it’s possible that the woman is experiencing a normal period.

If the bleeding is accompanied by the following symptoms, typically associated with pregnancy, it could be implantation bleeding: nausea, frequent urination, vomiting, bloating, raised sensitivity to smells, and breast tenderness. Note: Mild uterine cramping is normal for both regular menstruation and implantation bleeding, but if the bleeding is occurring together with intense abdominal and/or vaginal pain, seek medical attention. Intense pain could be a sign of early miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

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4. Check the amount.

Menstruation length can widely vary, but a woman can expect typical bleeding to last from 3-7 days in length. As a woman ages, menstruation is likely to shorten in length and lessen in intensity.

Implantation bleeding will last at a minimum of a few minutes and at a maximum of only 3 days. If bleeding or spotting lasts longer than 3 days, it is likely not implantation bleeding, though it should not be ignored if it comes at a time when a woman would not expect her regular period. (Any unexplained bleeding could signal something serious and should be evaluated with a doctor.) Women should expect to lose between 4 and 12 teaspoons of blood per menstrual cycle. Implantation bleeding will be significantly less blood lost.

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5. Check your intuition.

A belief in the power of a woman’s intuition has led many to believe that they can perceive a pregnancy long before showing any symptoms. If, after examining color, timing, symptoms, and amount, a woman still is unsure whether the blood is linked to implantation bleeding or period (or something else entirely), she should check her own intuition. By listening to one’s body, women can often detect a feeling that something is “off,” before there is any solid evidence to support it. It is very important, however, to keep an open dialogue with your doctor about any “feelings” and symptoms you might have.

As always, check with your doctor if there is any cause for concern. It can be tricky to tell the difference between implantation bleeding or period, but by paying careful attention to color, timing, symptoms, amount, and intuition and working together with your doctor, you can distinguish the difference and act appropriately for your health.

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Featured photo credit: Ann #1/Audrey via flickr.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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