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A 5-minute Guide to Content Management on your Smartphone

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A 5-minute Guide to Content Management on your Smartphone

Long story short

The idea to use my iPhone as a central hub for curating and managing content I value didn’t come overnight. Since the iPhone is the only device I always carry with me, it just makes sense. In today’s world, we all are mobile and road workers, at least to some extent.

Yes, all our apps allow us to browse the web, check for Facebook messages, read and send mail, and whatnot. We do it in trains, waiting for our meal, or ordering coffee.

But what if we become a little more serious, or should I say professional, by using our beloved devices? What if we want not only to consume, but refer to that piece of interesting content that just popped up on our smartphone? We might want to read it later or even better, collect everything valuable to one place, and find it again easily.

First of all, let me tell you, you’re not alone. Millions of users like you use mobile devices globally to an extend, unimaginable a couple of years ago. In a recent study comScore found that the users on mobile exceeded desktops more than a year ago.

Find out more here.

I learned it the hard way: For years now there are some options to do what I wanted (sort of):

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  1. Creating bookmarks for blog-posts
  2. File them away with applications like Instapaper
  3. Save images and PDF-files to the phone and much more

It’s just so many places scattered around in such a small device like an iPhone.
As fast as these were stored somewhere in my mobile they were out of sight and a pain to find later. Not to mention for referring to reading or being used for my recent presentation at the office.

What You Will Learn

  1. Store your blog-post, image, pdf or Slideshare URL to one reliable place in your smartphone
  2. Find it easily on whatever device you use
  3. Share it on social-media, with friends and colleagues or use it in your new bold presentation you want to present to your boss tomorrow

Preliminaries

Hardware

I will use an iPhone here, but any other smartphone or tablet will work. Just the screenshots and some used links will differ.

Apps

Please install the indispensable Pocket from the Apple App-Store

 
pocket
    Pocket App

    Download Pocket from App-Store

    One more is: Evernote. Wherever you are on whatever platform, Evernote will serve you with unparalleled sharing, storage and presenting features.

     
    Evernote app
      Evernote App

      Download Evernote from App-Store

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      Step 1: Store what’s great

      Once your web page with the greatest blog-post of all time is loaded tap this:

      Safari-Screen
        Safari Screen

        Then that:

        Post to Pocket
          Tap Pocket Icon

          Pocket will then be more than pleased to store your web page in a perfectly readable format. But without loosing the page’s URL, so that you always be able to open that page again.

          Pocket tags
            Pocket did his duty

            Pro-Tip

            If you dare to subscribe to the Pro-Account from Pocket, you will be very lucky to find Pocket to suggest tags. Those do then far better define the content stored and make it easier to find later (more of that in a minute).

            Suggested Tags by Pocket
              Suggested Tags by Pocket

              Look, that was easy, huh?

              Step 2: Review and forward post to its destiny

              Pocket-list
                Pocket Article List

                What a nice clean list, right?

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                Now let’s see what we can do with the content piece and forward it to where it belongs.

                For sure, you can directly share from within Pocket.

                Store in Evernote

                  Put that valuable piece of content in the right place: Evernote.

                  Pocket-evernote
                    Store in Evernote

                    Because since you are such an attentive reader, you may ask: Why on earth should I use Evernote, if I already stored my content in Pocket? Well, nicely put, my dear friend.

                    But for one, it would cost me many blog posts, even books to provide a full list of arguments for Evernote. Especially why it should be the final destination for everything collected digitally. But more importantly, because Evernote has become the de-facto standard for storing, sharing and even directly presenting. Trust me, those two more taps on your nice iPhone screen are worth it.

                    Now, I’m guessing you have a question: Why store my content on Pocket if I can save it directly to Evernote? You’re an expert on this topic, stop reading right now!

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                    Not so fast, though. The Evernote action on iOS is not (yet) as advanced as the Clipper for browsers. Pocket is going to deliver a far better reading experience as Evernote. Did you ever try to read a full-blown website on an iPhone screen? See, I knew you would agree.

                    Step 3: Final check and fine-tuning in Evernote

                    Evernote List
                      Evernote List

                      Finally, why not store the file in a notebook of your taste and put some more tags in it to be sure finding it later will be a breeze?

                      Believe it or not!

                      You’re done!

                      And don’t you dare to tell me that wasn’t easy as 1–2–3!

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                      More by this author

                      Jochen Burkhard

                      Owner Burkhard Consulting

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                      Last Updated on January 27, 2022

                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

                      Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

                      “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

                      Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

                      Food is a universal necessity.

                      It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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                      Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

                      Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

                      Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

                      Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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                      The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

                      Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

                      This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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                      Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

                      Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

                      Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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                      So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

                      Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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