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7 Benefits of Sweet Potato That Might Blow Your Mind

7 Benefits of Sweet Potato That Might Blow Your Mind

When’s the last time you ate a sweet potato? As a healthy, starchy vegetable, sweet potatoes make a perfect addition to any meal. They also stand alone as a great snack with a little a bit of coconut oil and salt.

Sweet potatoes are part of the root vegetable family that includes beets, carrots, parsnip, turnip, rutabaga and others. A little known fact is that the yam which makes an appearance around autumn, is actually a type of sweet potato. Who knew? Now you have a conversation starter at your dinner party.

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Another added benefit is that unlike the regular potato, this veggie has a sweet flavor that satisfies a sweet tooth craving, but avoids the sugar crash that is often associated with processed sugar. Here are a few other ways that sweet potatoes are highly beneficial — and the reasons why you should add them to your plate.

They are rich in nutrients

Full of beta-carotene which is converted into vitamin A when it is consumed, this veggie is a wise choice for optimal health. A big, 180-gram sweet potato baked in the oven with its skin has 1,730 micrograms of vitamin A. (The daily requirement is only 900 micrograms for men and 700 micrograms or women.) Vitamin A is crucial for a well-balanced diet because it helps with the tasks of regulating, repairing and growth various systems within your body (for example the growth and repair of your bones).

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They help control diabetes

Sweet potatoes rank low on the glycemic index scale and current research suggests that they may have a chance at decreasing the frequency of low blood sugar and insulin resistance episodes that occur in people with diabetes. The high levels of fiber also assist with type 1 diabetics to  decrease blood glucose levels and individuals with type 2 diabetics could have more stable blood sugar, insulin and lipid levels. A single medium-sized sweet potato has about 6 grams of fiber with its skin still intact. According to the Institute of Medicine, men should have a daily amount of 25 grams of fiber a day and women around 38 grams.

They help regulate digestion

The high level of fiber that is present in sweet potatoes is ideal for promoting a healthy digestive system and prevents constipation. The presence of magnesium also aids in creating a smooth-running GI system.

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They help prevent stomach ulcers

Not only are sweet potatoes great for curing digestive issues, but they are also known to be an ideal preventative measure against stomach ulcers due to the presence of B-complex vitamins, beta carotene, vitamin C, calcium and potassium — all substances that have healing power when it comes to curing stomach ulcers.

They help prevent arthritis

The beta-carotene, zinc, magnesium and vitamin-B complex present in sweet potatoes are critical in battling arthritis. An added bonus is that if you boil sweet potatoes, the remaining water can be rubbed externally on joints to lessen the pain that is associated with this illness.

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They help prevent cancer

According to a study done by Harvard School of Public Health’s Department of Nutrition, it is beneficial for younger men to consume a diet high diet in beta-carotene, in order to possibly ward off prostate cancer. In a separate study, beta-carotene has been shown to display an inverse association with colon cancer.

They improve vision

Jill Koury, MD, a Duke University ophthalmologist, claims that Vitamin A deficiency is responsible for the deterioration of the outer portions of the eye’s photoreceptors, resulting in damaged vision. The natural preventative solution? Consuming foods high in beta-carotene that will help with recovering vision. It is also important to note that the antioxidant-rich vitamins E and C present in sweet potatoes have been proven to increase healthy eyes and decrease the risk of degenerative damage.

So what are you waiting for? Sweet potatoes are one of nature’s ways for keeping you healthy — and they taste delicious. Try incorporating them into your diet today!

Featured photo credit: Flickr via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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