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15 Gorgeous American Campsites You Should Visit At Least Once In Your Life

15 Gorgeous American Campsites You Should Visit At Least Once In Your Life

Camping may not be your “thing.” It’s not for a lot of people. They prefer hotels with heated swimming pools, nice restaurants, and the comforts of indoor resting places during vacations. If you do enjoy camping, however, here are 15 of the most amazing campgrounds you will find anywhere in the world – all right here in the U.S.

And for those of you not into camping? You owe it to yourself to find a hotel close by and take some of the greatest day trips you will ever have. From wildlife, to amazing rock formations, to spring, summer and fall foliage, to panning for gold, these national “treasures” of ours, that we call state and national parks, offer some extraordinary experiences.

1. Watchman Campground – Zion National Park, Utah

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    Image by Al_HikesAZ via Flickr Creative Commons

    Sunrise and sunset are probably the most phenomenal sights at Watchman Campground. There is just something about the way the sunlight hits these magnificent sandstone cliffs that campers never tire of seeing. Add to that the gorgeous walking trail that takes you to the Virgin River which meanders through the canyon and provides cool relief from the heat in the height of the summer months. And in every direction, there are still those cliffs.

    As a campground, for tent camping only, there are lots of amenities for the novices who not want to completely rough it, and the park is open year-round! Take a look at the typical campground site at Zion South!

    2. Assateague Island, Maryland

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      Image by highboom via Flickr Creative Commons

      If beach camping is your thing, you cannot beat Assateague Island off the costs of Maryland and Virginia. This 34-mile long island boasts beach camping and all of the other regular activities that accompany a vacation in this environment. A truly unique feature of the island are the legendary wild horses that roam freely about and don’t seem to mind the human guests, even those that choose to get married there! They have been on the island for at least 200 years, although their origin is uncertain. Today, they are managed by auctioning off male colts every summer.

      There is no place in the world that has more beautiful sunrises and sunsets than Assateague, and for those who camp on the beach, this is your view every morning.

      3. Lake McDonald, West Glacier, Montana

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        Image by Kent Kanouse via Flickr Creative Commons

        The Glacier National Park in Montana truly could be one of the major wonders of the world. Lake McDonald specifically demonstrates the awesome power of ancient glaciers as they carved valleys through mountain ranges. In most instances, these valleys then became lakes, also called basins. Lake McDonald is 10 miles long and offers a very private 25-site campground at one end – Sprague Campground. In late spring and through the summer, it is highly popular, and it may be difficult to get a site, particularly on weekends.

        One of the highlights of any camping trip to this Park will be the 50-mile drive on the “gong-to-the-sun” road, a ride that will take visitors alongside mountains and through the wild interior of the Park. During the drive, you will cross the Continental Divide. It’s quite chilly at night so be certain that you have brought plenty of warm camping gear.

        4. Carvers Gap, Round Bald, North Carolina

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          Image by Joe Giordano via Flickr Creative Commons

          If you have never walked any of the famous Appalachian Trail, a marked trail that stretches from Georgia to Maine, then you have missed an amazing part of the scenery of the Eastern United States. The Trail was carved out and marked, starting in 1925, by a conservancy group that wanted to provide an amazing journey for anyone so moved, through the crests of this mountain range. In North Carolina, campers can park their cars and hike a short ½ mile trek to Carvers Gap which provides a huge panoramic view of a part of this magnificent mountain range. Several other campsites are located a bit further up the trail, and all of them offer the same views. This is not a campground with any amenities, so bring all that you will need!

          5. Albion Basin, Utah

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            Image by carfull… via Flickr Creative Commons

            Another glacial valley carved out and now a panoramic wonderland. The great feature is hiking up to Lake Cecret and getting the amazing view. And if you travel during the spring and summer, the wildflowers are extraordinary. As there are no organized campings available in area make sure you have packed all your overnight camping gear and sufficient supplies for the trip. Also, it’s worth remembering a few basic survival tips and tricks like always carrying water purifying tablets with you and using them correctly. Knowing how to quickly make a fire in moist environment and cook food fast will come essential as well. You will need pretty sturdy boots for this trek, but the view from the top is more than worth it!

            6. Joshua Tree National Park – White Tank Campground, Joshua Tree, California

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              Image by ilirjan rrumbullaku via Flickr Creative Commons

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              The Joshua Tree is a member of the Yucca plant family, and is most prevalent in the Mojave Desert. It was given its name by Mormons crossing the Mojave Desert in the mid-1800’s, because they thought it reminded them of a passage from the Bible in which Joshua raised his arms up to the sky. Congress named and designated this area in California as a national park, and it has a number of campgrounds. White Tank Campground is smaller than most and is far less crowded, probably because there is no running water. But the highlight? You will be camping right next to the Arch Rock – an amazing geological formation that spans about 30 feet. Of course, there are other unusual rock formations throughout the Park, but this is the most famous.

              7. Gros Ventre Wilderness – Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

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                Image by lord the air smells good today via Flickr Creative Commons

                Choose your spot – a regular campsite or a backcountry setting that you pick. Whichever you choose, however, the Bros Ventre Wilderness camping areas of the Grand Teton National Park is far less crowded and touristy than any other. And you are in for some amazing sights, whether they are of the Grand Tetons or the Gros Ventre Range. Wildlife (bear, moose elk, and a huge population of marmots) and fishing are huge draws to the area, but nothing can equal the absolutely breathtaking views.

                8. Wildwood State Park, Long Island, New York

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                  Image by sandy richard via Flickr Creative Commons

                  Nothing about New York City is relaxed, laid back, or filled with nature, unless, of course, you decide to get away from the madness and escape to a retreat on Long Island known as Wildwood State Park. There, stressed and burnt out city dwellers will find a beautiful wooded camp ground with sites dotted among the rich foliage. And, if the weather is right, there is beachcombing and swimming on some of the most beautiful natural beaches to be found.

                  In fact, that is one of the big draws of Wildwood – the beaches remain natural, sitting below bluffs above which sport small pine forests. There are waterfalls dotted about, about 600 acres of pristine forests, and great views of Long Island Sound from the tops of those bluffs which are accessible by a 3.8 mile hike or drive that loops around the Park.

                  9. Polihale State Park, Kauai, Hawaii

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                    Image by Andy Beal via Flickr Creative Commons

                    Beautiful white sand beaches is one of the most incredible features of this hugely popular camping mecca, along with an almost no-rainfall year, extraordinary sunsets, and the famous Na Pali Cliffs. Kauai has been nicknamed the garden island because of the tropical rainforest that inhabits most of the island. For those campers interested in rainforest wildlife, it is in abundance on this island. Because the campsites feature bathrooms, showers, and BBQ grills, campers can enjoy an extended stay in this little piece of paradise.

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                    10. Death Valley National Park, California

                    A colorful pre-sunrise at Zabriskie Point in Death Valley, California.

                      Image by Dave Toussaint via Flickr Creative Commons

                      The Eastern California Mojave Desert does not really “feel” like a desert. Here you have rolling hills, surrounding amazing sand dunes, with campsites dotted about. If you are looking for great sand dune fun, desert wildlife for photography, and amazing sunsets, then these campgrounds are perfect for you. Even if you don’t run around the dunes and play in the sand, they are a phenomenon worth photographing.

                      11. Treehouse Point, Washington, “Winter Camping”

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                        Image by Tony Guyton via Flickr Creative Commons

                        30 minutes from Seattle; the sight of all of your childhood dreams come true. Against the backdrop of the Raging River, you can stay in your very own treehouse. Not the “roughing it” of campgrounds, but still an experience to have. This is a romantic and certainly a bit magical place – a place to get married and a place to pan for gold, if you so choose, to fish, or just explore the secluded forests along the River. The “campground” is open year-round for any “snow bunnies.”

                        12. Nugent Mountain Camp Site – Big Bend National Park, Texas

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                          Image by Steve Dunleavy via Flickr Creative Commons

                          If you want a really primitive camping experience, and the solitude that comes with it, then you will need to travel to Nugent Mountain Campsite. Either car camp or bring a tent, but make sure that you are outside when the stars come out – it is one of the most amazing star-gazing places in the country. Other features are, of course, the scenery, the rivers, and the wildlife. You will also find some really unusual rock formations!

                          13. Whitewater State Park, Minnesota

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                            Image by darosenbauer via Flickr Creative Commons

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                            This campground is definitely for the nature lover in the spring and fall, first for the flowers and second for the fall foliage. Most of the park is quite high, on bluffs overlooking the Whitewater River. Campers will find great hiking trails, great trout fishing, and good mushroom hunting, especially for Morels.

                            14. Timber Creek Campgrounds – Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

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                              Image by Wally Gobetz via Flickr Creative Commons

                              This absolutely breath-taking park has 98 campsites that are set along the Colorado River. The highlights of any camping trip will be hiking to the Big Meadow and to the Granite Falls – there are waterfalls throughout the Park, but the Granite Falls is a 50-foot fall that is almost shocking to see. Among the animal life are elk, moose, black bear and fox who are easily seen along the shorelines. Because this park is nestled so far away from city lights, if you can plan your trip at the time of a new moon, you will have a spectacular view of the Milky Way. Late spring, summer and early fall are the best times to camp, and even then, nights can get chilly, so be prepared.

                              15. Mogollon Rim, Coconino National Forest, Arizona

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                                Image by Coconino National Forest via Flickr Creative Commons

                                This is one of the best kept secrets in Arizona! The Mogollon Rim is located in Eastern Arizona and is a part of the Colorado Plateau. In some spot the rim provides a 2000-foot high overlook on the Coconino National Forest. The forest itself is thousands of acres, and is an amazing sight in the fall. The Rim is a great place for hiking and exploring during the daytime, but the bigger draw are the sunsets and the star gazing at night. There are loads of campsites on the Rim, so campers generally don’t have difficulty finding one.

                                It is so easy to forget about the wonders that the U.S. has to offer. We seem to be so anxious to explore foreign lands, to soak up the countryside of France or the vineyards of Italy. We take Rhine River cruises and marvel at the beautiful bluffs along that River. We travel to mountain ranges, to deserts, and to beaches all over the world. If, on the other hand, we would begin to experience all that our own parks have to offer, we could spend the rest of our lives exploring them and still not run out of places to go and things to see!

                                Featured photo credit: John Fowler via flickr.com

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                                Last Updated on September 16, 2019

                                How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                                How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                                You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

                                We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

                                The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

                                Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

                                1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

                                Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

                                For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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                                • (1) Research
                                • (2) Deciding the topic
                                • (3) Creating the outline
                                • (4) Drafting the content
                                • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
                                • (6) Revision
                                • (7) etc.

                                Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

                                2. Change Your Environment

                                Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

                                One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

                                3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

                                Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

                                Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

                                My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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                                Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

                                4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

                                If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

                                Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

                                I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

                                5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

                                I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

                                Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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                                As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

                                6. Get a Buddy

                                Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

                                I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

                                7. Tell Others About Your Goals

                                This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

                                For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

                                8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

                                What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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                                9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

                                If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

                                Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

                                10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

                                Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

                                Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

                                11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

                                At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

                                Reality check:

                                I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

                                More About Procrastination

                                Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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