Advertising
Advertising

Common Web Design Mistakes That Very Few People Recognize

Common Web Design Mistakes That Very Few People Recognize

Web designers are wonderfully creative people. We love what we do; we love to experiment; we love to put our artistic “thumbprint” on all that we do. But, it is often too easy to get carried away with the “art” of it all and lose sight of one important fact – the website is designed first and foremost for the user, not the designer. And users want very specific things when they access a site. Here are some all-to-common web design mistakes that a pro may not even notice — but an end user certainly will.

1. Failing to Use a Grid When You Design a Page

Yes, grids can be seen as “confining” at times, but without one, the page looks “off” to the visitor who may not appreciate artistic asymmetry. The vast majority of users need a visual experience that makes sense to them vertically and horizontally – it makes them feel like the company is organized and structured. Unstructured design is best left for framing and mounting on a wall.

To correct this, you may be able to take your original design, superimpose it on a grid and make some changes. If that is going to be too hard, then keep your great design ideas, get a blank grid, and start again. You want your creativity to “shine” through, but you will have to temper it with structure. And, consider using a design tool (e.g. UX Pin) for grid design.

2. Using a “Canned” Theme and Failing to Customize It

Let’s be certain about one thing. There are some really great theme kits out there, and most designers make use of them. They result in consistency of pages throughout a site, and users like consistency. In fact, when you need to get a site up and running very quickly, a design theme kit is really the way to go. But, you will want to modify in order to really customize it for your purposes after that, so it doesn’t look like thousands of other websites.

If you are a bit stuck with what modifications you might want to make, search around for customized sites that you really like, and copy their URL’s. Then go to “What Theme is That?” and paste the URL in – you can find out what tool kit was used. You want one that will let your change things like color and typography. And if you are still stuck, you can use a white label partner, that your client doesn’t even know about. These consultants assist designers when they are having difficulties and act as fully “silent partners.” An excellent way to get a second opinion or a few practical solutions to your problems. The design community is typically more than willing to help one another.

Advertising

3. Not Designing for Multiple Platforms

If you design a site with the intention of just making everything smaller for tablets and then smaller still for phones, you will lose your mobile users. They will be swiping horizontally; the pages will be too cluttered, and their experiences will be poor.

Be certain that you use responsive design or a “mobile first” strategy as you design the site. Starting with mobile is usually a good idea, because it is a lot easier to add content and media as you move to larger screens than it is to take out content after the fact. Using a mobile first strategy also forces you to focus on the really critical aspects of a site first.

4. Getting Too “Out There” with Color and Font

Designers are, above all, artists, and artists love to experiment, especially with color and texture. If, when you finish your design prototype, you get feedback that things seem “out of place,” it is probably because you have not matched color palette and typography well enough. In general, viewers like things to “match.” It gives them a sense of security and the feeling that they are more in control.

Start with a color palette and typography that matches, making only minor tweaks at first. User test it all along the way – better to know now than later when your boss or client objects. And, be certain that the color and type you use are consistent with the type of business for which the site is designed. Sophistication requires black, white, and grays, sometimes navy; entertainment, travel, and leisure require brighter colors and more “fun” type; serenity uses calm blues and greens; professional sites should use navy, blues, greens and white. And if the company has a logo (think Starbucks), use the same colors for brand consistency.

5. Loads Too Slowly

This goes for the landing page and every other page on the site. It’s fun to add animation, videos, photos, and other media, but if those things are slowing down access, visitors will be move on to another site. Remember 2-3 seconds is a good target. And loading times will vary across devices, so that has to be accounted for too.

Advertising

You will need to find the “culprits” and get this fixed. And, you may need to eliminate or really compress things in order to speed up load time on tablets and phones. Again, user testing your prototypes before finalizing a design is pretty critical. One intermediary step you can take is to use a “loading video” which entertains the visitor while the site is loading. This can only be a temporary fix, however, unless you plan to hang out that video often. People will get bored.

6. Navigation is Just too Complex

Users don’t want to have to spend time figuring out how to get to what they want, nor do they want to spend time on lengthy drop-down menus. If it takes them too long to get where they want to go, it is just easier for them to bounce and go elsewhere.

The best fix for this is to have just a few links at the top of the landing page, and other pages that will get users to the main pages of the site. From there, they may find link to sub-pages. But, a good “rule of thumb” here is 3 clicks. A user should be able to get anywhere with that number. Another pretty effective design, especially when a site has lots of pages, is to put a sidebar menu for all of your more minor pages. This is far easier than that long drop-down.

And menus for mobile devices, especially for phones, have to be simpler. Drop downs may be better for phones, but there should only be 2-3 choices.

7. Using PDF Files for Reading

Users expect PDF files when they access educational and governmental websites. And they expect PDF files for lengthy things (e-guides, manuals, etc.), but they are irritated by them because of the slow loads. In some cases, PDF is essential because it keeps the original formatting of the page you are sharing.

Advertising

This is an easy fix, and it really is only a matter of remembering – PDF only for large files.

8. Not Having Color Changing Links

One of the nice things about a Google search is that when a user links to a site and then comes back, the color on that site link has changed, telling the user that s/he has accessed it already. It saves time and irritation. If you have not put that feature in your design, you should – users really appreciate it and it helps them get to where they are going.

9. Hiding Your Prices

You are a bit at the mercy of your boss or client on this one, but you are the expert and you should try to convince them that one of the most irritating things for visitors is not to be able to find a price very early in their navigations. Check competitors’ sites, and, if they are showing prices early, then you must do the same.

10. Not Having Enough White Space Around Important Elements, Like CTA’s

Too much clutter around the really important information and the CTA buttons confuses visitors, and they will miss things.

The fix of course is to clear things out and simplify as much as possible. Place buttons above the fold and put white space around them, using a distinctive color for them. And the button text should be a clearly contrasting color, to grab the eye. One more thing about buttons: Make the edges curved not squared off. Curved edges draw the eye in to read what the button says; squared edges take the eyes out and away from that button text.

Advertising

11. Not Having Simple, Large Registrations Forms

How much detail about someone is absolutely necessary? Users do not want to give out too much information or wait while you verify an email address; they want speed and simplicity. And mobile users, as well as most people over 40, really want larger form fields and buttons.

Be certain that you are only asking for the essential information on all forms, and make them a decent size for readability. Another thought here: It’s a nice idea to give users the option to enlarge text – “over 40 eyes” will thank you.

12. Not User Testing Every. Single. Thing.

If everything is not tested, and problems are discovered, then you have to go back and fix things while the site is already up and running. This means taking pages down as they are repaired, and it is a bit irritating for a user to link to a page, only to read, “Under Construction.”

If you user test absolutely every aspect and feature of the site, on multiple platforms, you will have a site that is “ready to roll” when you demonstrate it for your boss or client. And you should not do that user testing yourself. Ask a trusted colleague or use a white partner for this activity.

The Takeaway

Design begins with thinking like a user. S/he wants:

  • Visual appeal
  • Consistency
  • Simplicity
  • Easy navigation
  • Readable and broken-up text
  • Fast loading pages

Think like that user first and then add your creativity. You’ll have a design that users like and of which you will be proud.

More by this author

22 Creative Ways to Make Money (Simple and Effective) 20 Things Only Parents Of Children With Dyslexia Would Understand 9 Simple Tips to Make Your WordPress Blog Faster 11 Curious Facts About Baseball That You Didn’t Know 10 Strategies to Reduce And Repay Your College Debt

Trending in Technology

1 11 Google Chrome Apps and Features to Help You Get More Done with Less Effort 2 5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun 3 10 Best Task List Apps Out There for Getting Stuff Done 4 20 Google Search Tips to Use Google More Efficiently 5 8 Most Effective Games and Apps to Learn to Type Fast

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Published on September 20, 2018

11 Google Chrome Apps and Features to Help You Get More Done with Less Effort

11 Google Chrome Apps and Features to Help You Get More Done with Less Effort

In today’s fast-paced and never-ending busy world, we are overwhelmed by tasks that need to be completed by tight deadlines. With so much technology it is difficult to find the right tools to help boost our efficiency. And, many tools get obsolete so its essential to stay up-to-date to know when you will have to make adjustments to these tools. Independently of where you work, there’s a good chance that you have to be working on a PC or a laptop.

Do you are feel like you do not have enough time, or cannot accomplish much as of late? It is recommended to take a step back and look at the big picture. Also, you want to explore new and innovative ways to improve productivity.

In this article, I outline 11 features and apps within the Chrome browser that can help you do just that.

Minimizing Tabs

Let’s face it we all have more than a dozen tabs opened on our computers. One neat trick to still keep most of them open is to turn them into pinned tabs. On Google Chrome you can right-click the tab and select “Pin Tab” option. This turns the tab into an icon enabling you to continue multitasking.

Pinning a tab anchors the tabs on the left of your toolbar; a great benefit of the “Pin Tab” feature is that you can’t close these tabs accidentally since the “X” disappears after pinning them.

Incognito Mode

Google Chrome is a very easy-to-use and intuitive. But, Google does collect our browsing data; so to remedy this, you can use Incognito Mode. This feature does not keep your browsing or download history. You can enable or access it in three different ways:

Advertising

  1. Press Ctrl/Command+shift+N
  2. Select File Menu and choose New Incognito Window
  3. Download extension New Incognito Window

This feature is very handy if you’d rather not have your browsing history stored and utilized for future advertisement or suggested pages.

Save Webpages as PDF Files

Have you ever browsed interesting or important information and then forgot to bookmark or save it in “favorites”, making it impossible to find again? Chances are you have done this on a number of occasions.

Thankfully, there is an easy solution. You can save webpages as PDF files. On your keyboard, press control/command+p and you will be able to save webpages as PDFs.

Open Recently-closed Tabs

Ever had dozens of tabs opened and all of a sudden your browser shuts down? It has probably happened to all of us. You can easily recover all of your tabs using two approaches. Don’t panic if this happens because there is a workaround and solution for it.

One is by pressing Ctrl/CMD+Shift+T.

The other approach is to click on the three vertical dots on your browser and hover over “History”.

Advertising

Solve Mathematical Problems

Google’s Chrome browser doesn’t just search for relevant and updated information. It is also capable of performing some mathematical problems. Within the omnibox (Chrome’s address or URL bar), you can perform mathematical exercises.

For example, if you are struggling with percentages you can search 20 percent of x amount and it will instantly provide a result. Pretty handy, right?!

Play Media Files

Are you frequently met with difficulties when playing or watch a video files? Well, once again Chrome comes to the rescue. You can can listen or play videos from all sorts of movie or music files (mp3, mp4, .mov, .mkv, .ogv, .webm, .wav, etc.) by simply dragging the file into the search bar.

In addition, you can view images, PDF files and Microsoft Office files, too.

Navigate Swiftly Between Tabs

With all of those tabs opened comes great navigation responsibilities. Rather than clicking through every tab, you can use shortcut keys like Ctrl+Tab to navigate all of the different tabs. Also, you are able to navigate to the first tab by pressing Ctrl-1, Ctrl-2, and so on. If you want to switch to the very last tab, press Ctrl-9.

Stay Focus(e)d

Computers nowadays have awesome capabilities.

Advertising

Sometimes we like to get work done, but let’s face it, we’re all human. We sometimes procrastinate by visiting a website we really like, or maybe take a break with watching a flick on Netflix, a video on YouTube or browsing Facebook.

With Chrome’s StayFocusd extension, you can truly stay focused and get more done in less time.

This extension naturally helps you stay more productive by limiting the amount of time you spend on websites. You can set the time and it will automatically block those sites after a certain period.

Grammarly for Editing

Grammarly is a must have, and it’s really a complete powerhouse. Grammarly helps you check your grammar and spelling for everything you write online.

You can use it professionally or as a student, which will make the editing process much easier and more efficient. Furthermore, it can automatically check for typos when you send an email, type a Tweet, or post a Facebook comment. It’s like having your own personal copyeditor!

Loom

There are times that words in an email or written text in a chat app will just not convey the right meaning.

Advertising

There is a saying that a picture is worth a thousand words. Well, the same is true of videos.

With Loom, you can capture, narrate and immediately share video recordings of your screen, which will help coworkers understand issues you are facing, or to easily convey an explanation on screen. Plus, with video you will be able to easily walk people through a process, and you can use it to create simple how-to videos.

Chrome Calendar Extension

No matter what your level of responsibility is at your job, Google Calendar is another essential resource to have at your fingertips.

Specifically, you can have this extension added as an icon in the toolbar of your browser, which I highly recommend. Once you add the extension to your browser, you can check for upcoming events with a single click without leaving your current page.

Final Thoughts

Google Chrome has definitely evolved from its inception. As you can see you have a very powerful tool that comes as a free installation and is loaded with dozens of capabilities. The above listed Chrome apps can resolve some of the most common obstacles to your time management and productivity.

Featured photo credit: Andrew Neel via unsplash.com

Read Next