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Why Companies Should Value Parental Leave (For Both Men And Women)

Why Companies Should Value Parental Leave (For Both Men And Women)

My recollection of requesting parental leave was nothing short of a nightmare. There were lots of forms and paperwork to go through–not to mention the amount of planning, preparing, budgeting and coordinating efforts for the arrival of a newborn. Plus it is a stressful situation and conversation to have when you approach the company’s Human Resources (HR) department or manager in charge to request parental leave.

Depending on your professional track record, the company you work for and length of time you are requesting, the level of apprehension about requesting a leave of absence naturally skyrockets.

Parental leave is one of the crucial and pivotal moments for practically new or existing parents to deal with. Why? There are layers and layers of complications when it comes to trying to balance family and work life.

When it comes to accommodating paid leave there are a couple of harsh realities hitting the workforce at the present time. According to the Department of Labor (DOL) just 12 percent of United States (U.S) private sector workers have access to paid family leave through the company they are employed.

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Evidently taking time off from work means loss of income. What ends up happening is too many workers cannot afford to be on parental leave and cut it short. So the pressures not only mount at work to make up for lost time, but also disrupts your time with family, which becomes a whole other issue.

Benefits and advantages of paid leave

Once an employee has proven his place and worthiness within a company, independent of size, they should be entitled to parental paid leave. This is not a matter of economics or number of hours he or she has accrued. It is about the well-being of parents and maximizing their living conditions.

This can be done in a number of ways. When we reserve enough resources for a parental leave request through a company you will retain your best and most talented in the company, while at same time eliminate the risk of turnover. According to a CIO Magazine analysis, when companies adopt a parental leave policy the work options for parents lead to higher employee engagement and retention.

In both cases, paid paternity and maternity leave brings with it numerous and favorable payoffs. Below is a list of the positive effects of paid leave asserted by the DOL:

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  • Maternity leave overall improves the child´s health outcomes and increased birthweight.
  • Leave decreases premature birth and decreased infant mortality.
  • Paid leave encourages men to take paternity leave and serve as good caregivers.
  • Paid maternity leave increases work retention and reduces retention.
  • Paid paternity leave encourages men to be better caregivers.

It is essential for the current employee workforce to have the conditions and financial support for parental or maternal leave. This will not only help parents, but companies will reduce expenses for training and hiring new staff. Currently states like Massachusetts, California, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut and various cities have passed legislation for paid family and medical leave.

Parental paid benefits around the globe

Parental employment benefits outside of the U.S is a different narrative altogether. A visual graphic on Visual.ly paints a picture of the top countries for maternity and paternity leave, including the nations with the least amount of days to take leave.

So who are the countries with the top rank for parental (maternity) leave? They are as follows, including the maximum length of leave (days):

  • Croatia  (406 days)
  • Albania (365 days)
  • Australia (365 days)
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina (365 days)
  • Montenegro (365 days)
  • Serbia (365 days)
  • UK (365 days)
  • Norway (322 days)

On the other hand, here are the 10 worst countries when it comes to maternity leave:

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  • United States (84 days)
  • Lesotho (84 days)
  • Swaziland (84 days)
  • Nepal (84 days)
  • Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (50 days)
  • Qatar (50 days)

The paternity paid leave length for men is far less in comparison. For the top 10 countries for paternity leave you have Iceland (91 days), Norway (70 days), Spain (28), Finland (18 days), Slovenia (15 days), Azerbaijan (14 days) and others.

Momentum has shifted since legislation began promoting and advocating parental leave. Between 1994 and 2013 countries that provided at least 14 weeks of maternity leave increased from 38 to 51 percent. Up until last year, eight countries offer incentives to encourage new fathers to take parental leave.

Takeaways and conclusion

As the 21st century continues to be flooded with innovation and technological tools for the workplace, progress must be made primarily with regards to parental policies before anything else. Legislative action must introduce and approve the ability to really tackle the harsh reality and financial burdens of parental leave. Otherwise you are forcing people to improvise on their own without any sort of support during these important personal events. One natural consequence is this will lead to and perhaps discourage young professionals from starting families.

From coast to coast in the U.S things have begun to change. In a detailed news report by the New York Times corporations are shifting to more family-friendly benefits. For example, companies for Accenture and Microsoft would be implementing generous parental leave rules. The tech streaming giant, Netflix, recently instituted a full paid leave measure for new mothers and fathers for up to 365 days.

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Still there is much work to be done. Drafting company policies tailored towards new parents will strengthen the families, balance work and family life, allow for a full recovery and better control of finances.

Featured photo credit: Winter Day 10 – Seeking balance/lisaclarke via flickr.com

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Anthony Carranza

Multilingual writer and journalist covering all things technology and productivity.

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Last Updated on March 29, 2021

5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

When I left university I took a job immediately, I had been lucky as I had spent a year earning almost nothing as an intern so I was offered a role. On my first day I found that I had not been allocated a desk, there was no one to greet me so I was left for some hours ignored. I happened to snipe about this to another employee at the coffee machine two things happened. The first was that the person I had complained to was my new manager’s wife, and the second was, in his own words, ‘that he would come down on me like a ton of bricks if I crossed him…’

What a great start to a job! I had moved to a new city, and had been at work for less than a morning when I had my first run in with the first style of bad manager. I didn’t stay long enough to find out what Mr Agressive would do next. Bad managers are a major issue. Research from Approved Index shows that more than four in ten employees (42%) state that they have previously quit a job because of a bad manager.

The Dream Type Of Manager

My best manager was a total opposite. A man who had been the head of the UK tax system and was working his retirement running a company I was a very junior and green employee for. I made a stupid mistake, one which cost a lot of time and money and I felt I was going to be sacked without doubt.

I was nervous, beating myself up about what I had done, what would happen. At the end of the day I was called to his office, he had made me wait and I had spent that day talking to other employees, trying to understand where I had gone wrong. It had been a simple mistyped line of code which sent a massive print job out totally wrong. I learn how I should have done it and I fretted.

My boss asked me to step into his office, he asked me to sit down. “Do you know what you did?” I babbled, yes, I had been stupid, I had not double-checked or asked for advice when I was doing something I had not really understood. It was totally my fault. He paused. “Will you do that again?” Of course I told him I would not, I would always double check, ask for help and not try to be so clever when I was not!

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“Okay…”

That was it. I paused and asked, should I clear my desk. He smiled. “You have learnt a valuable lesson, I can be sure that you will never make a mistake like that again. Why would I want to get rid of an employee who knows that?”

I stayed with that company for many years, the way I was treated was a real object lesson in good management. Sadly, far too many poor managers exist out there.

The Complete Catalogue of Bad Managers

The Bully

My first boss fitted into the classic bully class. This is so often the ‘old school’ management by power style. I encountered this style again in the retail sector where one manager felt the only way to get the best from staff was to bawl and yell.

However, like so many bullies you will often find that this can be someone who either knows no better or is under stress and they are themselves running scared of the situation they have found themselves in.

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The Invisible Boss

This can either present itself as management from afar (usually the golf course or ‘important meetings) or just a boss who is too busy being important to deal with their staff.

It can feel refreshing as you will often have almost total freedom with your manager taking little or no interest in your activities, however you will soon find that you also lack the support that a good manager will provide. Without direction you may feel you are doing well just to find that you are not delivering against expectations you were not told about and suddenly it is all your fault.

The Micro Manager

The frustration of having a manager who feels the need to be involved in everything you do. The polar opposite to the Invisible Boss you will feel that there is no trust in your work as they will want to meddle in everything you do.

Dealing with the micro-manager can be difficult. Often their management style comes from their own insecurity. You can try confronting them, tell them that you can do your job however in many cases this will not succeed and can in fact make things worse.

The Over Promoted Boss

The Over promoted boss categorises someone who has no idea. They have found themselves in a management position through service, family or some corporate mystery. They are people who are not only highly unqualified to be managers they will generally be unable to do even your job.

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You can find yourself persistently frustrated by the situation you are in, however it can seem impossible to get out without handing over your resignation.

The Credit Stealer

The credit stealer is the boss who will never publically acknowledge the work you do. You will put in the extra hours working on a project and you know that, in the ‘big meeting’ it will be your credit stealing boss who will take all of the credit!

Again it is demoralising, you see all of the credit for your labour being stolen and this can often lead to good employees looking for new careers.

3 Essential Ways to Work (Cope) with Bad Managers

Whatever type of bad boss you have there are certain things that you can do to ensure that you get the recognition and protection you require to not only remain sane but to also build your career.

1. Keep evidence

Whether it is incidents with the bully or examples of projects you have completed with the credit stealer you will always be well served to keep notes and supporting evidence for projects you are working on.

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Buy your own notebook and ensure that you are always making notes, it becomes a habit and a very useful one as you have a constant reminder as well as somewhere to explore ideas.

Importantly, if you do have to go to HR or stand-up for yourself you will have clear records! Also, don’t always trust that corporate servers or emails will always be available or not tampered with. Keep your own content.

2. Hold regular meetings

Ensure that you make time for regular meetings with your boss. This is especially useful for the over-promoted or the invisible boss to allow you to ‘manage upwards’. Take charge where you can to set your objectives and use these meetings to set clear objectives and document the status of your work.

3. Stand your ground, but be ready to jump…

Remember that you don’t have to put up with poor management. If you have issues you should face them with your boss, maybe they do not know that they are coming across in a bad way.

However, be ready to recognise if the situation is not going to change. If that is the case, keep your head down and get working on polishing your CV! If it isn’t working, there will be something better out there for you!

Good luck!

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