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Watch These 12 TED Talks To Inspire Your Success

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Watch These 12 TED Talks To Inspire Your Success

You feel like you’re wasting your talent. You always knew you had a potential, but somehow you could not exploit it. You developed your passion, but could not continue because you could not maintain patience or you lost motivation.

Let’s face it – people are also not always supportive, especially when someone goes against the norm. There are many entrepreneurs out there who had a great idea that other people thought was crazy.

In the last 50 years, some really interesting products have emerged “as seen on TV.” From Suzanne Somers’ “Thigh Master” to the “Veg-o-matic” to the “Perfect Bacon Bowl,” I’m sure these entrepreneurs gave people a lot of laughs with their idea. But imagine if the people who invented these listened to other people’s criticism. They would not have been successful.

If you are confident about your idea, you just need to continue pursuing it and not listen to anybody who wants to take you down. Who knows – you might invent next best thing since sliced bread. Here below are 12 TED Talk Episodes you should watch to get inspired to chase your One Crazy Dream.

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1. How to get your ideas to spread (Seth Godin)

In this video, marketing Heavyweight Seth Godin explains why weird and bizarre ideas are easier to catch people’s attention with than  boring ones. Our product is only as good as the idea that we are spreading, so we should be remarkable and willing to spread the word.

2. The happy secret to better work (Shawn Achor)

You are going to laugh until you cry. This speech starts with Shawn Achor convincing his younger sister that when she fell off the bunk bed and crash landed on floor, and incidentally broke her leg, that she landed like a unicorn and therefore she was a unicorn.

She so wanted to believe this and was so happy, that she ignored her pain and climbed back up onto the bed. Through his metaphors and anecdotes, Shawn Achor has found the funniest way to explain the art of achieving happiness.

3. Lessons in creativity (Julie Bernstein)

In this video, Radio Host Julie Berstein shares her precious four steps on how to create in the face of challenge. She illustrates how important creativity is in all professional careers, not just art forms, and that everyone is somehow an artist.

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4. The power of introverts (Susan Cain)

In a world where being outgoing is supposed to be the best trait to succeed, being an introvert is difficult, even shameful and annoying at times. Susan Cain argues in her intense talk that introverts bring a different breed of talents and skills and should be encouraged,and being an introvert could really be a blessing in disguise.

5. Dare to disagree (Margaret Heffernan)

There are times that we deeply disagree with the logic or ideas presented to us, but we are reluctant to argue because it is a human nature to back away from conflict.

In this video, Margaret Heffernan shows us that good opposing arguments are vital parts of the process, and introduce us to the world of passionate disagreement. She argues that we need ideas at odds with our own if we are to discover our assumptions and biases.

6. How great leaders inspire action (Simon Sinek)

With examples of ultra-successes like Apple, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Wright brothers, Simon Sinek explains how leaders inspire actions, beginning with the bases of all complex questions: why and what.

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If we are to inspire and motivate people around us, we should start by looking for an answer to the purpose that makes us wake every morning beginning with simple questions like why and what.

7. Are we in control of our decisions? (Dan Ariely)

Being rational is not an option, it’s a need these days. But do we think as rational as we think we do? Behavioural Economist Dan Ariely uses visual illusions and his own outlandish research outcomes to prove that we might not be the rational thinker we assume we are.

8. Draw your future – Take control of your life (Patti Dobrowolski)

In this Ted Talk, speaker Patti Dobrowolski graphically explains the differences between what you are and what you want to be with sketches and colors. She is able to show how good living the dream can be as she sheds light on three simple steps to achieve it.

9. Choice, happiness and spaghetti sauce (Malcolm Gladwell)

Widely revered inspirational writer Malcom Gladwell is fascinated by the food industry’s obsession with spaghetti sauce, and makes a broader argument about our choices of actions and happiness.

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10. Trial, error and the God complex (Tim Harford)

An economics writer by profession, Tim Harford studies complex systems and finds odd links between successful people and how coherent trials and errors shaped them into the way they are today. Tim Harfold urges people to accept their entropy and start making mistakes with purpose.

11. Let’s raise kids to be entrepreneurs (Cameron Herold)

In this age where children are taught to be respectable professionals like doctors, engineers and architects, there are many who just don’t get it.

“Bored in school, failing classes, at odds with peers: this child might be an entrepreneur,” says Cameron Herold. He makes the case for parenting and education that helps would-be entrepreneurs flourish.

12. Secrets of success in 8 words, 3 minutes (Richard St. John)

Are successful people special or just lucky? Richard St. John condenses his hours of interviews in three minutes about the real ingredients of success. His few words have so much that can be taken away and be applied to entrepreneurial endeavors.

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Featured photo credit: Dan Ariely speaking at TED Talk (Wikimedia) via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on October 21, 2021

How to Create Your Own Ritual to Conquer Time Wasters and Laziness

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How to Create Your Own Ritual to Conquer Time Wasters and Laziness

Life is wasted in the in-between times. The time between when your alarm first rings and when you finally decide to get out of bed. The time between when you sit at your desk and when productive work begins. The time between making a decision and doing something about it.

Slowly, your day is whittled away from all the unused in-between moments. Eventually, time wasters, laziness, and procrastination get the better of you.

The solution to reclaim these lost middle moments is by creating rituals. Every culture on earth uses rituals to transfer information and encode behaviors that are deemed important. Personal rituals can help you build a better pattern for handling everything from how you wake up to how you work.

Unfortunately, when most people see rituals, they see pointless superstitions. Indeed, many rituals are based on a primitive understanding of the world. But by building personal rituals, you get to encode the behaviors you feel are important and cut out the wasted middle moments.

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Program Your Own Algorithms

Another way of viewing rituals is by seeing them as computer algorithms. An algorithm is a set of instructions that is repeated to get a result.

Some algorithms are highly efficient, sorting or searching millions of pieces of data in a few seconds. Other algorithms are bulky and awkward, taking hours to do the same task.

By forming rituals, you are building algorithms for your behavior. Take the delayed and painful pattern of waking up, debating whether to sleep in for another two minutes, hitting the snooze button, repeat until almost late for work. This could be reprogrammed to get out of bed immediately, without debating your decision.

How to Form a Ritual

I’ve set up personal rituals for myself for handling e-mail, waking up each morning, writing articles, and reading books. Far from making me inflexible, these rituals give me a useful default pattern that works best 99% of the time. Whenever my current ritual won’t work, I’m always free to stop using it.

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Forming a ritual isn’t too difficult, and the same principles for changing habits apply:

  1. Write out your sequence of behavior. I suggest starting with a simple ritual of only 3-4 steps maximum. Wait until you’ve established a ritual before you try to add new steps.
  2. Commit to following your ritual for thirty days. This step will take the idea and condition it into your nervous system as a habit.
  3. Define a clear trigger. When does your ritual start? A ritual to wake up is easy—the sound of your alarm clock will work. As for what triggers you to go to the gym, read a book or answer e-mail—you’ll have to decide.
  4. Tweak the Pattern. Your algorithm probably won’t be perfectly efficient the first time. Making a few tweaks after the first 30-day trial can make your ritual more useful.

Ways to Use a Ritual

Based on the above ideas, here are some ways you could implement your own rituals:

1. Waking Up

Set up a morning ritual for when you wake up and the next few things you do immediately afterward. To combat the grogginess after immediately waking up, my solution is to do a few pushups right after getting out of bed. After that, I sneak in ninety minutes of reading before getting ready for morning classes.

2. Web Usage

How often do you answer e-mail, look at Google Reader, or check Facebook each day? I found by taking all my daily internet needs and compressing them into one, highly-efficient ritual, I was able to cut off 75% of my web time without losing any communication.

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3. Reading

How much time do you get to read books? If your library isn’t as large as you’d like, you might want to consider the rituals you use for reading. Programming a few steps to trigger yourself to read instead of watching television or during a break in your day can chew through dozens of books each year.

4. Friendliness

Rituals can also help with communication. Set up a ritual of starting a conversation when you have opportunities to meet people.

5. Working

One of the hardest barriers when overcoming procrastination is building up a concentrated flow. Building those steps into a ritual can allow you to quickly start working or continue working after an interruption.

6. Going to the gym

If exercising is a struggle, encoding a ritual can remove a lot of the difficulty. Set up a quick ritual for going to exercise right after work or when you wake up.

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7. Exercise

Even within your workouts, you can have rituals. Spacing the time between runs or reps with a certain number of breaths can remove the guesswork. Forming a ritual of doing certain exercises in a particular order can save time.

8. Sleeping

Form a calming ritual in the last 30-60 minutes of your day before you go to bed. This will help slow yourself down and make falling asleep much easier. Especially if you plan to get up full of energy in the morning, it will help if you remove insomnia.

8. Weekly Reviews

The weekly review is a big part of the GTD system. By making a simple ritual checklist for my weekly review, I can get the most out of this exercise in less time. Originally, I did holistic reviews where I wrote my thoughts on the week and progress as a whole. Now, I narrow my focus toward specific plans, ideas, and measurements.

Final Thoughts

We all want to be productive. But time wasters, procrastination, and laziness sometimes get the better of us. If you’re facing such difficulties, don’t be afraid to make use of these rituals to help you conquer them.

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More Tips to Conquer Time Wasters and Procrastination

 

Featured photo credit: RODOLFO BARRETO via unsplash.com

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