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Watch These 12 TED Talks To Inspire Your Success

Watch These 12 TED Talks To Inspire Your Success

You feel like you’re wasting your talent. You always knew you had a potential, but somehow you could not exploit it. You developed your passion, but could not continue because you could not maintain patience or you lost motivation.

Let’s face it – people are also not always supportive, especially when someone goes against the norm. There are many entrepreneurs out there who had a great idea that other people thought was crazy.

In the last 50 years, some really interesting products have emerged “as seen on TV.” From Suzanne Somers’ “Thigh Master” to the “Veg-o-matic” to the “Perfect Bacon Bowl,” I’m sure these entrepreneurs gave people a lot of laughs with their idea. But imagine if the people who invented these listened to other people’s criticism. They would not have been successful.

If you are confident about your idea, you just need to continue pursuing it and not listen to anybody who wants to take you down. Who knows – you might invent next best thing since sliced bread. Here below are 12 TED Talk Episodes you should watch to get inspired to chase your One Crazy Dream.

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1. How to get your ideas to spread (Seth Godin)

In this video, marketing Heavyweight Seth Godin explains why weird and bizarre ideas are easier to catch people’s attention with than  boring ones. Our product is only as good as the idea that we are spreading, so we should be remarkable and willing to spread the word.

2. The happy secret to better work (Shawn Achor)

You are going to laugh until you cry. This speech starts with Shawn Achor convincing his younger sister that when she fell off the bunk bed and crash landed on floor, and incidentally broke her leg, that she landed like a unicorn and therefore she was a unicorn.

She so wanted to believe this and was so happy, that she ignored her pain and climbed back up onto the bed. Through his metaphors and anecdotes, Shawn Achor has found the funniest way to explain the art of achieving happiness.

3. Lessons in creativity (Julie Bernstein)

In this video, Radio Host Julie Berstein shares her precious four steps on how to create in the face of challenge. She illustrates how important creativity is in all professional careers, not just art forms, and that everyone is somehow an artist.

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4. The power of introverts (Susan Cain)

In a world where being outgoing is supposed to be the best trait to succeed, being an introvert is difficult, even shameful and annoying at times. Susan Cain argues in her intense talk that introverts bring a different breed of talents and skills and should be encouraged,and being an introvert could really be a blessing in disguise.

5. Dare to disagree (Margaret Heffernan)

There are times that we deeply disagree with the logic or ideas presented to us, but we are reluctant to argue because it is a human nature to back away from conflict.

In this video, Margaret Heffernan shows us that good opposing arguments are vital parts of the process, and introduce us to the world of passionate disagreement. She argues that we need ideas at odds with our own if we are to discover our assumptions and biases.

6. How great leaders inspire action (Simon Sinek)

With examples of ultra-successes like Apple, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Wright brothers, Simon Sinek explains how leaders inspire actions, beginning with the bases of all complex questions: why and what.

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If we are to inspire and motivate people around us, we should start by looking for an answer to the purpose that makes us wake every morning beginning with simple questions like why and what.

7. Are we in control of our decisions? (Dan Ariely)

Being rational is not an option, it’s a need these days. But do we think as rational as we think we do? Behavioural Economist Dan Ariely uses visual illusions and his own outlandish research outcomes to prove that we might not be the rational thinker we assume we are.

8. Draw your future – Take control of your life (Patti Dobrowolski)

In this Ted Talk, speaker Patti Dobrowolski graphically explains the differences between what you are and what you want to be with sketches and colors. She is able to show how good living the dream can be as she sheds light on three simple steps to achieve it.

9. Choice, happiness and spaghetti sauce (Malcolm Gladwell)

Widely revered inspirational writer Malcom Gladwell is fascinated by the food industry’s obsession with spaghetti sauce, and makes a broader argument about our choices of actions and happiness.

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10. Trial, error and the God complex (Tim Harford)

An economics writer by profession, Tim Harford studies complex systems and finds odd links between successful people and how coherent trials and errors shaped them into the way they are today. Tim Harfold urges people to accept their entropy and start making mistakes with purpose.

11. Let’s raise kids to be entrepreneurs (Cameron Herold)

In this age where children are taught to be respectable professionals like doctors, engineers and architects, there are many who just don’t get it.

“Bored in school, failing classes, at odds with peers: this child might be an entrepreneur,” says Cameron Herold. He makes the case for parenting and education that helps would-be entrepreneurs flourish.

12. Secrets of success in 8 words, 3 minutes (Richard St. John)

Are successful people special or just lucky? Richard St. John condenses his hours of interviews in three minutes about the real ingredients of success. His few words have so much that can be taken away and be applied to entrepreneurial endeavors.

Featured photo credit: Dan Ariely speaking at TED Talk (Wikimedia) via upload.wikimedia.org

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on March 25, 2020

How Do You Change a Habit (According to Psychology)

How Do You Change a Habit (According to Psychology)

Habits are hard to kill, and rightly so. They are a part and parcel of your personality traits and mold your character.

However, habits are not always something over-the-top and quirky enough to get noticed. Think of subtle habits like tapping fingers when you are nervous and humming songs while you drive. These are nothing but ingrained habits that you may not realize easily.

Just take a few minutes and think of something specific that you do all the time. You will notice how it has become a habit for you without any explicit realization. Everything you do on a daily basis starting with your morning routine, lunch preferences to exercise routines are all habits.

Habits mostly form from life experiences and certain observed behaviors, not all of them are healthy. Habitual smoking can be dangerous to your health. Similarly, a habit could also make you lose out on enjoying something to its best – like how some people just cannot stop swaying their bodies when delivering a speech.

Thus, there could be a few habits that you would want to change about yourself. But changing habits is not as easy as it seems.

In this article, you will learn why it isn’t easy to build new habits, and how to change habits.

What Makes It Hard To Change A Habit?

To want to change a particular habit means to change something very fundamental about your behavior.[1] Hence, it’s necessary to understand how habits actually form and why they are so difficult to actually get out of.

The Biology

Habits form in a place what we call the subconscious mind in our brain.[2]

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Our brains have two modes of operation. The first one is an automatic pilot kind of system that is fast and works on reflexes often. It is what we call the subconscious part. This is the part that is associated with everything that comes naturally to you.

The second mode is the conscious mode where every action and decision is well thought out and follows a controlled way of thinking.

A fine example to distinguish both would be to consider yourself learning to drive or play an instrument. For the first time you try learning, you think before every movement you make. But once you have got the hang of it, you might drive without applying much thought into it.

Both systems work together in our brains at all times. When a habit is formed, it moves from the conscious part to the subconscious making it difficult to control.

So, the key idea in deconstructing a habit is to go from the subconscious to the conscious.

Another thing you have to understand about habits is that they can be conscious or hidden.

Conscious habits are those that require active input from your side. For instance, if you stop setting your alarm in the morning, you will stop waking up at the same time.

Hidden habits, on the other hand, are habits that we do without realizing. These make up the majority of our habits and we wouldn’t even know them until someone pointed them out. So the first difficulty in breaking these habits is to actually identify them. As they are internalized, they need a lot of attention to detail for self-identification. That’s not all.

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Habits can be physical, social, and mental, energy-based and even be particular to productivity. Understanding them is necessary to know why they are difficult to break and what can be done about them.

The Psychology

Habits get engraved into our memories depending on the way we think, feel and act over a particular period of time. The procedural part of memory deals with habit formation and studies have observed that various types of conditioning of behavior could affect your habit formations.

Classical conditioning or pavlovian conditioning is when you start associating a memory with reality.[3] A dog that associates ringing bell to food will start salivating. The same external stimuli such as the sound of church bells can make a person want to pray.

Operant conditioning is when experience and the feelings associated with it form a habit.[4] By encouraging or discouraging an act, individuals could either make it a habit or stop doing it.

Observational learning is another way habits could take form. A child may start walking the same way their parent does.

What Can You Do To Change a Habit?

Sure, habits are hard to control but it is not impossible. With a few tips and hard-driven dedication, you can surely get over your nasty habits.

Here are some ways that make use of psychological findings to help you:

1. Identify Your Habits

As mentioned earlier, habits can be quite subtle and hidden from your view. You have to bring your subconscious habits to an aware state of mind. You could do it by self-observation or by asking your friends or family to point out the habit for your sake.

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2. Find out the Impact of Your Habit

Every habit produces an effect – either physical or mental. Find out what exactly it is doing to you. Does it help you relieve stress or does it give you some pain relief?

It could be anything simple. Sometimes biting your nails could be calming your nerves. Understanding the effect of a habit is necessary to control it.

3. Apply Logic

You don’t need to be force-fed with wisdom and advice to know what an unhealthy habit could do to you.

Late-night binge-watching just before an important presentation is not going to help you. Take a moment and apply your own wisdom and logic to control your seemingly nastily habits.

4. Choose an Alternative

As I said, every habit induces some feeling. So, it could be quite difficult to get over it unless you find something else that can replace it. It can be a simple non-harming new habit that you can cultivate to get over a bad habit.

Say you have the habit of banging your head hard when you are angry. That’s going to be bad for you. Instead, the next time you are angry, just take a deep breath and count to 10. Or maybe start imagining yourself on a luxury yacht. Just think of something that will work for you.

5. Remove Triggers

Get rid of items and situations that can trigger your bad habit.

Stay away from smoke breaks if you are trying to quit it. Remove all those candy bars from the fridge if you want to control your sweet cravings.

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6. Visualize Change

Our brains can be trained to forget a habit if we start visualizing the change. Serious visualization is retained and helps as a motivator in breaking the habit loop.

For instance, to replace your habit of waking up late, visualize yourself waking up early and enjoying the early morning jog every day. By continuing this, you would naturally feel better to wake up early and do your new hobby.

7. Avoid Negative Talks and Thinking

Just as how our brain is trained to accept a change in habit, continuous negative talk and thinking could hamper your efforts put into breaking a habit.

Believe you can get out of it and assert yourself the same.

Final Thoughts

Changing habits isn’t easy, so do not expect an overnight change!

Habits took a long time to form. It could take a while to completely break out of it. You will have to accept that sometimes you may falter in your efforts. Don’t let negativity seep in when it seems hard. Keep going at it slowly and steadily.

More About Changing Habits

Featured photo credit: Mel via unsplash.com

Reference

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