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10 Games to Create Long Lasting Memories With Your Kids?

10 Games to Create Long Lasting Memories With Your Kids?

I was probably eight or nine. It was before the age of the Internet and the release of the Nintendo. I had exhausted my regular activities (like riding my bike) and had run out of make-believe scenarios to play out in my backyard. Because my brother and I lived on a main road with few neighbors, we were always in the same boat… bored.

One afternoon, we bugged my mother to play with us. Being that she is an on the spot creative type, she invented a game called “Court.” She made up the rules as she went along. She played the judge and told us each what crime we were being charged with. We had to defend our innocence by pleading our case and in the end, she would determine who was guilty. She told us our “crime” and sent us away with one manila file folder and some loose-leaf paper. We both went to our rooms to plan our defense. Once prepared, we testified.

I will never forget playing that game of “Court” for the first time. I can tell you the room we were in and that it was a beautiful summer day, trees in full bloom. I can tell you the exact chair my mom sat in and where the chair was positioned, even though I haven’t been in that house or seen that furniture for over twenty-five years. My mother didn’t know it at the time, but that day she created one of the few photographic memories I have of her.

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Are you wanting your children to create a long-lasting, visual memory of you? If so, here are ten activities that if done rarely, are a sure proof way to remain picture perfect forever in your child’s mind. I hope you enjoy these activities that will help create a photographic memory for your child.

1. Have a Tea Party

When my two girls and I play Tea Party together, magic happens. I let my nine year old put makeup on herself and my four year old. They both put on their finest dresses. They get a grand opening when they come down the stairs as my husband or I announce them. I am their maître de and always have a towel hanging over one arm. I escort them to a small table equipped with a tablecloth and a lit candle. I begin by offering them water (in shot glasses because otherwise they’d never get used). I offer all sorts of exotic teas even though I only have two kinds. Everything I bring to them comes out on my expensive china, which makes them feel like millionaires. Sometimes I buy tea cookies but usually I just pull something out that I already have, like cheese and crackers. If I can find my bell, I give that to them too. They put linen napkins over their laps and I make their tea extra sweet since they are. We all speak in British accents and I bow to them constantly. Of course, I also take pictures, but more for me because I know their picture will be locked mentally.

2. Court

Looking for a gavel? Pull out your meat pounder. Then pick a crime. Need some case ideas? How about who left out the ice cream? Who stole the cookies out of the cookie jar? Which one of you painted on the wall? Who used all the toilet paper and didn’t replace the roll?

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3. Dance Party USA

This can be done totally on the fly with no preparation necessary. You turn off the TV, get off your computer, blast the radio, and then get your funk on. You do this until you are sweating bullets, can barely breathe, and are afraid you’re going to have a heart attack. Did I mention belting the song out as loud as you can while holding hands and twirling with your oldest? To do this well, you need to pull a muscle and barely be able to walk the next day.

4. Fort Building

There isn’t a week that goes by that my kids aren’t using the couch cushions to build a fort in the family room. However, wouldn’t they love it so much better if I built the fort with them? To make it extra special, try putting a card table in front of a closet and then covering it with a sheet. Assuming there isn’t a swamp of shoes and clothes on the floor, you can set up a mini-city. Spend the night in sleeping bags and watch a movie inside the fort while you all munch on popcorn. Let the fort stay up a few days to let the kids play in it before it gets taken down until the next year.

5. Tent Camping

If I have to explain this then you have bigger problems than trying to create a photographic memory for your kids. You can even pitch a tent in your own backyard for a fun change of pace.

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6. Film a Movie

Sit down with your kids and a notebook. Work together as a family to come up with a plot. Sometimes it’s easiest to pick fairytales that everyone knows so you can spend more time acting and recording, rather than figuring out logistics. This is a great time for dads to come into the picture. They can be in the movie or he can videotape. Think of the fun you will all have watching these movies together thirty years down the road.

7. Create a Photo Album

Decide on a theme such as Selfie Central (where you go around the house or city one day taking as many selfies as you can). There’s also Dress Up Then Mess Up (where your kids put on the tackiest outfits and accessories… and so do you). Another good one? Silly/Ugly faces. Take dozens of pictures, print them out and then store them in an album. You won’t believe how often your children will want to flip through so they can remember that special day.

8. Build a Card Tower or Dominoes Display

See Tent Camping (above).

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9. Read the Same Book, but Only Once a Year

Now it’s time to talk about my dad. Every Christmas Eve, no matter what, he always read ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas. After a few years of this, it wouldn’t have been Christmas Eve without my dad reading it to us. It’s one of my fondest and clearest memories of my dad and when I think back to it. Now when I bring the memory to to the forefront it makes me feel like daddy’s little girl all over again. Of course, I had to carry this tradition on with my own kids. There’s a certain intangible magic at work with special memories like this. Pass this incredible quality on to your children.

10. Spend the day acting like a kid with your kid(s)

You’ll need to plan ahead for this one. Events might include: water balloon fights, egg toss, participating in their lemonade stand, bike riding, chalk on the driveway, bubbles, board games, swinging with them as high as you can, etc. You do it all: you get messy, you get dirty, and you won’t regret it.

Conclusion

You will find one major commonality between the ten ideas above. Each feeds children the nutrients they need more than anything… your time, love, and undivided attention. It is an opportunity to make your children a center point and prove to them they are the most important thing to you. These traditions extend past the turkey dinner or Easter egg hunt. They are thoughtful, deliberate, and different. They are so cherished and different that there’s no doubt even one activity will create photographic and long lasting memories your child will have of you.

Featured photo credit: Browse more: carousel, fun, funfair, horses, night, traditionalTest Drive image Take a look how this image can be used! Traditional Carousel Horses on a Fun Fair Ride via picjumbo.com

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Published on October 23, 2020

How to Help Your Kids to Deal with Bullies at School

How to Help Your Kids to Deal with Bullies at School

Sara is in her first year of Junior High. Every day, when Sara walks down the school hallway between her mid-morning classes, there is a group of girls who will tease, push her, or dump her books from her arms.

She wonders daily what she did to deserve their meanness. She doesn’t even know these girls as they came from a different primary school than her own. Every evening, she lays in bed and cries just thinking about having to encounter these girls in the hallway the next day.

Jeremy used to be good friends with Bill until Bill started calling Jeremy names. At first, it started as what seemed to be Bill trying to get a laugh from the other boys on his soccer team. He would make fun of Jeremy to get a laugh from the other boys. He has continued with the behavior for weeks, but it has gotten worse and Bill now calls Jeremy hurtful names at their soccer practice every day. Jeremy is thinking about quitting soccer because the situation has become so bad.

Renee was born with a congenital defect. Her arm is malformed and she only has three fingers on one hand. She is in her first year of primary school. There is a little boy in her class who makes fun of her arm and mimics her arm movements and shortened arm effect anytime they are together and a teacher isn’t watching. Renee cries at home after school saying that she doesn’t want to go to school anymore. Her parents are bewildered as she has been begging to go to school for years. Now that she is old enough to be enrolled in primary school, she doesn’t want to attend anymore after just one month of school. Her parents have no idea what is causing her to be upset and not want to go to school.

These are just three examples of bullying. Bullying can vary widely in behavior and context. Parents must know the difference between “kids just being kids” and bullying.

Bullying Defined

Bullying involves repeated behavior that harms another child. For example, the girls who continually pick on Sara in the hallway are bullying her by dumping her books, pushing her, and shoving her every day.

Bullying is not always physical, though. For example, in the situation of Jeremy, his teammate Bill is bullying him by calling him names repeatedly.

StopBullying.gov is a website about bullying that is hosted by the United States government. This website provides a clear definition of bullying as the following:[1]

Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Both kids who are bullied and who bully others may have serious, lasting problems. In order to be considered bullying, the behavior must be aggressive and include [an imbalance of power and repetition].

An Imbalance of Power: Kids who bully use their power—such as physical strength, access to embarrassing information, or popularity—to control or harm others. Power imbalances can change over time and in different situations, even if they involve the same people.

Repetition: Bullying behaviors happen more than once or have the potential to happen more than once. Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.

Bullying is aggressive, mean, and/or unwanted behaviors that happen repeatedly to a child.

Intervention

Bullying, especially for kids, requires immediate intervention. If your child suddenly decides that they no longer want to go to school or that they want to quit an activity, then a discussion should occur. Sit down with your child, and ask them what is going on in their life.

Have compassion, understanding, and care in your words and tone of voice so that your child can open up to you. You never know if they are being a victim of bullying unless they open up to you and share what is occurring in their life.

Some children don’t share immediately because they are embarrassed by the bullying. Others don’t tell their parents because they are afraid of the bully. They worry that if they tell, the wrath of the bully may get worse. This should also be a concern for the parents.

Any intervention must be effective in removing the threat of the bully. If reporting the situation makes the bully’s behavior worse, then the intervention has failed.

Talk to School Leadership

Parents should talk to school leadership, such as the teacher, counselor, or principal when a bullying situation is occurring. If the bullying is happening at school, then the staff should be made aware so that they can intervene.

Most schools have policies and protocols in place for handling bullies. Such things may include separating the students so that they aren’t interacting anymore.

For example, with the situation of Renee, the boy who makes fun of her arm may be moved away from the school table they currently share. He would be moved to a separate side of the classroom so that he couldn’t easily communicate or make fun of Renee.

Then, the counselor would talk to the boy about how his actions are hurtful and why he shouldn’t be making fun of anyone. The teacher and principal may have to implement consequences, such as removal from class or suspension, that are made clear to the student and his parent if he continues his behavior.

In many instances, removing the opportunity for the students to interact is the best way for the bullying to stop. If the bully doesn’t have the opportunity to interact or communicate with the victim, their bullying behavior is stopped. This is the reason why in many instances of bullying parents need to involve school staff members (if it is happening at school).

Parents can’t control where the students sit in the classroom. However, the school can change where students sit in the classroom. Parents should speak to the school about the bullying to ensure that appropriate interventions are made, including separating the bully from their victim.

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Parents

Parents are advocates for their children. If parents do not stand up to protect their child, then who will? When a situation of bullying is revealed by a child, the parents need to take the information seriously.

Unfortunately, many parents of bullies don’t want to admit that their child is a bully. It can look and feel like they failed as parents. When a child is being bullied, that parent may reach out to the bully’s parent for intervention only to be put off. The bully’s parent may claim it is the other child’s fault, or they may insist that their child is innocent.

This is why intervention should happen at the school if possible. Parents must advocate protecting their children as bullying can leave mental and emotional scars. The sooner they can get the bullying to cease, the better.

Bullying Can Have Serious Effects

Victims of bullying can develop depression and anxiety. The ongoing bullying can impact a child mentally and emotionally long term. The Suicide Prevention Resource Center cites research that shows that both bullies and their victims are at an increased risk for suicide.[2] In recent years, suicide has been increasing among teens and pre-teens. Bullying, including cyberbullying, is one of the primary causes for the increase in suicide among our youth.

The serious—and sometimes even deadly—effects of bullying should be considered by all parents. If a child comes forward to reveal a situation of bullying, affecting either them or someone else, then parents and adults must intervene. Schools are set up to handle these situations, with policies and protocols in place. The consequences of bullying can be quite serious, which is why most schools have taken steps to institute bullying policies.

Signs of Bullying

Not all kids will come forward to tell their parents that they are being bullied. Parents should be aware of behavioral changes in their child, such as depression, anxiety, sadness, loss of interest in activities or school, sleeping issues, not eating, irritability, and moodiness. If your child exhibits any of these behaviors for a period of two weeks or more, then it is time to talk to the child about what is happening in their life.

A parent who suspects bullying may be happening can talk to their child about bullying in general. The parent can explain what bullying can look like, or they can provide an example that has happened in their own life. They can explain that it is not the victim’s fault.

Let the child know that if they see other children being bullied or if they are experiencing bullying, then they need to tell an adult (preferably you as the parent). When the child believes that telling can help the situation, that child is likely to then talk about it.

How to Help Your Kids

If your child is being bullied, you can and should help them. You can do it not only via intervention within the school but also by helping them cope with the situation.

The first step is talking—having the child open up and talk about what is happening so that you can help them with strategies to stop the bullying. You can’t help them unless you know what is actually happening.

Here are some more ways that you can help your child who is dealing with a bully:

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1. Advise Them to Avoid the Bully

If they aren’t exposed to the bully, then the bullying often stops. This is often why school intervention is needed so that the kids are separated and no longer have interactions.

If it is cyberbullying taking place (e.g., your child is being bullied on social media) then they may need to block the person who is bullying them or put their own account on hold.

2. Advise Them to Walk Away and Not Engage

Many bullies thrive on reaction. The reaction from the person being bullied is what fuels their behavior. They may be doing it to make others laugh, or they do it to feel power over another person. If the reaction from the one being bullied goes away, then the bully may become less interested.

You should advise your kids to not engage with a bully. Walking away without reacting is a good way of handling the bully.

3. Let Them Know It Is Okay to Get Help

The child should feel empowered to get help when they need it. For example, if Jeremy stays in soccer and the coach is informed about what is happening and the bullying happens again, Jeremy should tell the coach.

He can do it confidentially after practice, or he can talk to the coach off to the side during practice if possible. If Jeremy needs intervention for Bill to stop, then he needs to ask for help when it happens.

4. Build Their Confidence

Often, a bully chooses to bully someone because they see the person as a weak or easy target. Other times, a child is picked on because there is something about them that is different. Building up your child’s confidence and self-esteem is important to helping them prepare for handling bullying in the future.

For example, if another child makes fun of Renee’s arm next year in her new class, she would be prepared to shut it down by defending herself confidently with calm words that deter the child from making fun of her again.

Every situation is different. But if your child has something that makes them different or stand out from others, then they can be prepared to handle the situation better if they know in advance what they would say to someone who picks on them for this difference.

5. Encourage Them to Have Positive Friendships

Children and youth need peer relationships. This helps them live a balanced and healthy life. A child without peer relationships and friendships is more likely to be a target of bullies.

Encourage your child to make friends with others who are positive and kind. Help your child develop these skills as well. You can’t get friends unless you can be a friend.

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Be There for Your Child

One of the worst things that a parent can do when their child is being bullied is for them to say “tough it out” or “kids will be kids”. Not taking their situation seriously and not helping them is failing them. Parents must be willing to not only listen to their child and allow them to express things openly, but they must also be ready to help their child.

If your child comes to you because they are being bullied, then take the situation seriously. The lasting effects of bullying are not something you will want to deal with in the future. Deal with the situation at hand so that the bullying can cease today.

Be prepared to take serious action. If your school principal is not taking the situation seriously, then take it to the next level. Inform the school board or school administrators about what is happening. Keep the facts, and let them know you want the bullying to stop immediately.

If the school doesn’t take any action and the bully continues to be a threat to your child, then be prepared to remove your child from the situation or the school, so you can protect your child from harm. Above all else, our job as parents is to protect our children.

Bullying is not a one-time instance of someone saying something mean to your child. Bullying is a repeated act, whether physically or verbally, that is harming your child. Don’t allow your child to be repeatedly harmed. Once you know that bullying is happening, it must be stopped immediately through appropriate interventions.

Get Additional Help if Needed

If your child has been bullied and is suffering from depression, anxiety, or other emotional turmoil because of bullying then they should get professional help. You can go to Psychology Today and enter your location to find a qualified therapist near you. This website allows you to search by issue and treatment age as well. This can help you find a therapist near you who can help your child with their specific issues.

Stomp Out Bullying is another website with additional support and information about bullying. They offer a free chat line to teens who are experiencing bullying. If your teen is being bullied and needs additional support check out their website today.

Final Thoughts

Bullying, especially for kids, is a serious matter that should be addressed as soon as possible. It can bring long-term psychological and physical damage to your children if you don’t act on it immediately. Your primary role as a parent is to protect your child from harm. This guide can help you help your kids to deal with bullies to get them out of harm’s way.

Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] StopBullying.gov: What Is Bullying
[2] Suicide Prevention Resource Center: Suicide and Bullying

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