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Fun and Easy Ways To Sync Your Android To Windows 10

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Fun and Easy Ways To Sync Your Android To Windows 10

Continually plugging in your phone to your computer in order to move files can be daunting and time-consuming, to say the least.

However, if you use an Android device (as well as Windows 10), I’ve got good news for you.

You can easily connect your Android devices to your Windows 10 computer without having to physically plug it in!

How? By syncing.

Here is a simple guide to setting it up:

1. Cortana

Cortana is an intelligent personal digital assistant for Windows 10 that uses voice command to perform basic tasks such as getting information, saving things and a lot more.

Cortana_082915_115514_PM

    Windows 10 comes with Cortana by default. At the time of writing, Cortana is only available to Android users as a beta product.

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    The Cortana app on Android extends Cortana’s functionality across Android devices. It operates with the same data sources as Windows Cortana which means it can do most of the things Cortana does on Windows PC and phones.

    Cortana has a “Notebook” feature where personal information such as reminders, location data, contacts and interests are stored. This feature makes syncing between your phone and your PC a breeze!

    All the things you put into your Cortana Notebook on Windows 10 will be available for use in the Android version of the app.

    For instance, if you have Cortana set up to monitor the web for available job postings in your industry or to deliver flight information, those options will be immediately available to you use across all your devices!

    2. File Explorer

    If you want to transfer files (photos, documents, videos, songs etc.) between your Android and Windows 10, syncing your mobile device and the Windows 10 File Explorer will help you do this easily.

    To do this though, you’d need a USB cable.

    Here’s how to go about it:

    Get a micro-USB cable or a USB Type C cable. Once plugged in, open the File Explorer in your computer.

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    Have in mind that you may have to change the USB connection on your phone to allow Windows to access it.

    To do that, simply look for “MTP” or “Computer transfer” in your phone. The name may vary here based on the type of phone you’re using, but it’s always obvious.

    After activating your phone to allow Windows to access its storage and after you’ve opened File Explorer, go over to “This PC” and open it. In the “This PC” section, you’ll find your phone there.

    Screenshot_083015_120908_AM

      By syncing your Android device and Windows 10 this way, you’d be able to easily access the files stored in your phone and move things around as you want.

      3. DropBox

      DropBox is a cloud storage service for your photos, videos, docs, and files.

      The service starts with 2GB of free storage space. If you want more space, you can always get 1TB for $9.99 a month; or if you want more free extra space, there are couple of opportunities for that.

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      dropbox

        Windows 10 comes with a useful DropBox app that allows you to save, access, view, and move files around in the storage space.

        The Windows 10 version of the app also has an auto camera-upload which can be very useful on the mobile front (and yeah, it works pretty well with Android).

        Anything you add to DropBox will automatically show up on all your computers and phones, including your Windows 10 and Android devices. This allows anywhere-anytime accessibility.

        4. Google Drive

        Over the past few years, Microsoft has integrated some of their apps and services with Android.

        For instance, you can find app and services such as Office, OneNote and OneDrive in the Android system. Cortana has also been made available on Android.

        The integration has given Microsoft the opportunity to expand their reach and horizon.

        google_drive

          On Windows 10, there’s integrated Google Drive functionality which allows syncing once you download and add Google Drive into your file structure.

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          The syncing works much like OneDrive with folders and files in it.

          5. OneDrive

          For those who don’t know, OneDrive is a Microsoft owned cloud storage service. OneDrive works much like DropBox and Google Drive and also allow anywhere-anytime accessibility.

          OneDrive

            OneDrive offers users free storage space of about 15GB. What’s more, users can get more space as follow:

            • 500MB for referring a friend
            • 100GB for a mere $1.99 per month
            • 1TB (plus Office 365) for $6.99 per month

            Good thing is, some new Android devices now come with OneDrive by default as some Android manufacturers have began to include the service in their phones.

            The Bottom Line

            If you use Android and Windows 10, life can become easier, faster and more enjoyable if you sync things up versus physically plugging them in every now and then.

            So, go ahead, apply the information shared above and create an awesome user experience for yourself.

            Happy syncing!

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            Featured photo credit: Perspective Of Man Working On Laptop With Coffee And Smartphone via stokpic.com

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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