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Fun and Easy Ways To Sync Your Android To Windows 10

Fun and Easy Ways To Sync Your Android To Windows 10

Continually plugging in your phone to your computer in order to move files can be daunting and time-consuming, to say the least.

However, if you use an Android device (as well as Windows 10), I’ve got good news for you.

You can easily connect your Android devices to your Windows 10 computer without having to physically plug it in!

How? By syncing.

Here is a simple guide to setting it up:

1. Cortana

Cortana is an intelligent personal digital assistant for Windows 10 that uses voice command to perform basic tasks such as getting information, saving things and a lot more.

Cortana_082915_115514_PM

    Windows 10 comes with Cortana by default. At the time of writing, Cortana is only available to Android users as a beta product.

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    The Cortana app on Android extends Cortana’s functionality across Android devices. It operates with the same data sources as Windows Cortana which means it can do most of the things Cortana does on Windows PC and phones.

    Cortana has a “Notebook” feature where personal information such as reminders, location data, contacts and interests are stored. This feature makes syncing between your phone and your PC a breeze!

    All the things you put into your Cortana Notebook on Windows 10 will be available for use in the Android version of the app.

    For instance, if you have Cortana set up to monitor the web for available job postings in your industry or to deliver flight information, those options will be immediately available to you use across all your devices!

    2. File Explorer

    If you want to transfer files (photos, documents, videos, songs etc.) between your Android and Windows 10, syncing your mobile device and the Windows 10 File Explorer will help you do this easily.

    To do this though, you’d need a USB cable.

    Here’s how to go about it:

    Get a micro-USB cable or a USB Type C cable. Once plugged in, open the File Explorer in your computer.

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    Have in mind that you may have to change the USB connection on your phone to allow Windows to access it.

    To do that, simply look for “MTP” or “Computer transfer” in your phone. The name may vary here based on the type of phone you’re using, but it’s always obvious.

    After activating your phone to allow Windows to access its storage and after you’ve opened File Explorer, go over to “This PC” and open it. In the “This PC” section, you’ll find your phone there.

    Screenshot_083015_120908_AM

      By syncing your Android device and Windows 10 this way, you’d be able to easily access the files stored in your phone and move things around as you want.

      3. DropBox

      DropBox is a cloud storage service for your photos, videos, docs, and files.

      The service starts with 2GB of free storage space. If you want more space, you can always get 1TB for $9.99 a month; or if you want more free extra space, there are couple of opportunities for that.

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      dropbox

        Windows 10 comes with a useful DropBox app that allows you to save, access, view, and move files around in the storage space.

        The Windows 10 version of the app also has an auto camera-upload which can be very useful on the mobile front (and yeah, it works pretty well with Android).

        Anything you add to DropBox will automatically show up on all your computers and phones, including your Windows 10 and Android devices. This allows anywhere-anytime accessibility.

        4. Google Drive

        Over the past few years, Microsoft has integrated some of their apps and services with Android.

        For instance, you can find app and services such as Office, OneNote and OneDrive in the Android system. Cortana has also been made available on Android.

        The integration has given Microsoft the opportunity to expand their reach and horizon.

        google_drive

          On Windows 10, there’s integrated Google Drive functionality which allows syncing once you download and add Google Drive into your file structure.

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          The syncing works much like OneDrive with folders and files in it.

          5. OneDrive

          For those who don’t know, OneDrive is a Microsoft owned cloud storage service. OneDrive works much like DropBox and Google Drive and also allow anywhere-anytime accessibility.

          OneDrive

            OneDrive offers users free storage space of about 15GB. What’s more, users can get more space as follow:

            • 500MB for referring a friend
            • 100GB for a mere $1.99 per month
            • 1TB (plus Office 365) for $6.99 per month

            Good thing is, some new Android devices now come with OneDrive by default as some Android manufacturers have began to include the service in their phones.

            The Bottom Line

            If you use Android and Windows 10, life can become easier, faster and more enjoyable if you sync things up versus physically plugging them in every now and then.

            So, go ahead, apply the information shared above and create an awesome user experience for yourself.

            Happy syncing!

            Featured photo credit: Perspective Of Man Working On Laptop With Coffee And Smartphone via stokpic.com

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            Last Updated on May 14, 2019

            8 Replacements for Google Notebook

            8 Replacements for Google Notebook

            Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

            1. Zoho Notebook
              If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
            2. Evernote
              The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
            3. Net Notes
              If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
            4. i-Lighter
              You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
            5. Clipmarks
              For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
            6. UberNote
              If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
            7. iLeonardo
              iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
            8. Zotero
              Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

            I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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            In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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